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The Lawyer, the Human, and the Archive: Revisiting the Legal History

Lecture | Jan 25, 2007 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room


Professor Samera Esmeir, Department of Rhetoric, University of California at Berkeley


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


The paper offers a different reading of the legal history of Egypt under British Rule. Scholarship on the legal history of Egypt is based, for the most part, on a positivist reading of texts produced by the agents of the law. This, argues Professor Samera Esmeir, conceals the degree to which these agents authored the story of the law for future generations of lawyers and historians. The paper attempts to retrieve another story of the law that does not avail itself in the archives of the law.


A Question of Identity: Mosques in the Arab World

Lecture | Feb 1, 2007 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens Hall


Professor Hasan-Uddin Khan, School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation, Roger Williams University


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


The mosque is Islam's outward and symbolic statement. The significance of the mosque remains central to Islam in the modern world and continues to serve as the focal point for Muslim communities, both in Islamic countries and in the West. The architecture of the mosque in Arabia, the heartland of Islam, from the time of the Prophet until today – the focus of this talk – reveals some of the deep-rooted issues in the region and its impact worldwide. It helps us to understand many of the broader concerns of Muslims today.


War Cultures: Military Imaginaries and Arab cities

Lecture | Feb 8, 2007 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens Hall


Professor Derek Gregory, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia at Vancouver


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


The 'war on terror' and, in particular, the use of air power in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq has produced a renewed interest in the political and ethical philosophy that frames targeting. Many critics have pointed to the ways in which the politics of vision involved in reducing the world to a series of targets sanitises military violence, and have called for a politics of witnessing capable of connecting these abstract, high-altitude representations to the corporeality of war. But the same logic of targeting is mobilized when armies fight on the ground, including urban warfare. This presentation reviews the imaginative geographies of Arab cities deployed by the US military. It explores its reduction of cities to object-spaces, largely empty of ordinary people -- a repetition of the classical colonial gesture of Terra Nullius -- and then, as war becomes indistinct from occupation and occupation from war, it follows the 'cultural turn' pursued by the military as it (desperately) seeks to find the terms for inhabited cities.


The Global Vision of Youssef Ezeddin Eassa

Lecture | Feb 15, 2007 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens Hall


Fatan Eassa


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Ms. Eassa will discuss the life and work of her father, Youssef Ezeddin Eassa, a well-known Egyptian writer and Fulbright Scholar to the University of California at Berkeley in the 1960s.


Egyptian by Association: People's Associations and the Cultivation of National Ideals (1885-1939)

Lecture | Mar 1, 2007 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens Hall


Professor Lisa Pollard, Department of History, University of North Carolina at Wilmington


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


This lecture examines Egypt's "gama'iyyaat ahliyya" (people's associations) from their beginnings in the 1880s through the rise of Nasser's state in the early 1950s. The lecture illustrates gama'iyya activities as anti-colonial, community focused, and nationalist. The lecture also considers the gama'iyyaat as models of civil society, and of the ideals and institutions that the Nasserite state ultimately took credit for building.


Palestine 1915: The Collapse of the Ottoman Era in the Diaries of Soldiers from the Great War

Lecture | Mar 8, 2007 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room 340


Professor Salim Tamari, professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Birzeit University, Birzeit, visiting professor Department of History, University of California at Berkeley


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


The Great War (1914-1918) constituted a rupture in Syrian, Turkish and Palestinian identities with the world of a multi-ethnic imperial regime that prevailed until then. Two diaries from officers who fought in the two extremities of the Ottoman Empire (Gallipoli and Suez) have survived from the years 1915-1917. These diaries open for us a window into the intimate life of soldiers that are rarely reported in subsequent nationalist historiography: daily life in provincial Ottoman cities, the dictatorship of Jamal Pasha, love and betrayal in the trenches, and the disintegration of Turkish-Arab affinities. The discussion of these diaries will also address the war as an emancipatory experience for soldiers who fought in it­a dimension that is often overlooked in the debates about the devastation of war.


Double-Feature Film Showing: “My Terrorist” and “My Land Zion”

Film - Feature | Apr 5, 2007 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens Hall


Yulie Cohen Gerstel


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


“My Terrorist.” For the sake of a better future for her daughters in Israel, director Cohen Gerstel attempts a reconciliation with the guerrila from the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine who in 1978 shot her when she was an El Al flight attendant in London.

In “My Land Zion” Cohen Gerstel takes a journey through rocks and fields and across three generations of Israelis, encountering the myths that shaped the state and herself. She confronts the actions of her parents in 1948 in particular.

"It was my choice to live in the land of my ancestors and now it is my daughters’ home, too. A state of myths and sacrifices, where our sons and daughters still grow up to kill or get killed. How can I stay in a state that devours its children? " YCG, Tel Aviv July 2004


Morocco and Algeria Reparations: From Vichy France to Post-Independent Indemnities

Lecture | Apr 19, 2007 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens Hall


Professor Susan Slyomovics, Department of Anthropology, University of California at Los Angeles


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Reparations, according to international protocols, include restitution, compensation, rehabilitation, satisfaction, and guarantees of non-repetition. If human rights violations are presented primarily in material terms for financial indemnification, then acknowledging and filing an indemnity claim becomes one way for victims to testify and be recognized. Case studies are the Moroccan Justice and Truth Commission (mandate ended November 2005), the newly implemented 2005 Algerian commission, and the recent 2004 German Foundation to indemnify Moroccan, Algerian, Tunisian, and Libyan Jewish forced laborers during World War II.


The Problem of Being Modern in the Middle East

Lecture | May 3, 2007 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens Hall


Professor Keith David Watenpaugh, Department of Religious Studies, University of California at Davis


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Drawing from his recent book, Being Modern in the Middle East: Revolution, Nationalism, Colonialism and the Arab Middle Class (Princeton, 2006), Prof. Watenpaugh explores the questions and class and modernity against the backdrop of the cosmopolitan city of Aleppo, Syria in the period (1908-1946). Discussions of the middle class have been largely absent from historical writings about the Middle East. Prof. Watenpaugh fills this lacuna by drawing on Arab, Ottoman, British, American and French sources and an eclectic body of theoretical literature and shows that within the crucible of the Young Turk Revolution of 1908, World War I, and the advent of late European colonialism, a discrete middle class took shape. Moreover, this class was defined not just by the wealth, professions, possessions, or the levels of education of its members, but also by the way they asserted their modernity.


1967: Israel's Longest Year

Lecture | May 8, 2007 | 5:30 p.m. | International House, room Chevron Auditorium


Dr. Tom Segev, Journalist and Visiting Professor, Graduate School of Journalism, University of California at Berkeley


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, Helen Diller Family Program in Jewish Studies


Going beyond a mere military account, Dr. Segev recreates the situation in Israel just prior to 1967, showing how economic recession, a full grasp of the Holocaust's horrors, and the dire threats made by neighbor states combined to produce an apocalyptic climate of doom. Mining a wealth of unpublished letters, diaries, government memos, and military records, Segev reconstructs an era of new possibilities and tragic missteps. He introduces the legendary figures—Moshe Dayan, Golda Meir, Gamal Abdul Nasser, and Lyndon Johnson—as well as an epic cast of soldiers, lobbyists, refugees, and settlers. He reveals Israel's intimacy with the White House and the political rivalries that sabotaged any chance of peace. Above all, he challenges the conventional view that the war was inevitable, showing the series of disastrous miscalculations that lie behind the bloodshed then, as now.


Excavations in the Ninth Pylon at Karnak

Lecture | Aug 26, 2007 | 2:30 p.m. | Barrows Hall, room 20


Charles Van Siclen III, American Research Center in Egypt, Cairo


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, Near Eastern Studies, American Research Center in Egypt, Northern California Chapter


Rethinking the Cause of Tutankhamun's Death

Lecture | Sep 30, 2007 | 2:30 p.m. | Barrows Hall, room 20


Dr. Benson Harer, MD, Independent Scholar


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, Near Eastern Studies, American Research Center in Egypt, Northern California Chapter


Conversation with Marcel Khalife

Special Event | Oct 9, 2007 | 5:30 p.m. | Morrison Hall, room 125


Marcel Khalife


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, Department of Music


Join the UC Berkeley community for an evening with world-renowned Lebanese composer and master of the oud, Marcel Khalife.


Marcel Khalife: Taqaism

Performing Arts - Music | Oct 10, 2007 | 8 p.m. | Herbst Theatre, 401 Van Ness Ave, San Francisco


Marcel Khalife


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, Arab Cultural and Community Center, La Pena Cultural Center, KPFA's Voices of the Middle East and North Africa


In Taqasim, UNESCO Artist for Peace Marcel Khalife gives tribute to Mahmoud Darwish. Without lyrics and solely using the lower register of the oud and upright bass, Khalife communicates “those tremendous but obscure dimensions that are often ignored by the listeners’ ears – the task of expressing the profound consonance between the poet and the musician.”


Desiring Arabs

Lecture | Oct 11, 2007 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room 340


Professor Joseph Massad, Department of Middle East and Asian Languages & Cultures, Columbia University


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Shari`a Law, Islamic State: An Historical Anthropology

Lecture | Oct 18, 2007 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room 340


Professor Brinkley Messick, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Based on research on the imamate of mid-twentieth century highland Yemen, I examine a world of academic juridical theory and court application. I distinguish between the "library" and the "archive" of the shari`a as part of my method in reading shari`a texts. Yemen was not colonized by a western power and the period in question was just prior to the local advent of the nation state.


Shari`a Law, Islamic State: An Historical Anthropology

Lecture | Oct 18, 2007 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room 340, Sultan Room


Brinkley Messick, Anthropology, Columbia University


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Based on research on the imamate of mid-twentieth century highland Yemen, I examine a world of academic juridical theory and court application. I distinguish between the "library" and the "archive" of the shari`a as part of my method in reading shari`a texts. Yemen was not colonized by a western power and the period in question was just prior to the local advent of the nation state.


Public Islam in Contemporary Europe

Colloquium | Oct 20, 2007 | 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room 340


Professor Soraya Tlatli, Department of French, University of California at Berkeley, Professor Malika Zeghal, The Divinity School, University of Chicago, Professor Jocelyne Dakhlia, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Professor Stefania Pandolfo, Department of Anthropology, University of California at Berkeley


French, Department of, Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


In current debates, diverse Muslim practices are often portrayed as either "radical" and/or are grounded in binary oppositions: secular vs. theological, public vs. private, etc. As the discussion between pre-eminent scholars of European Islam Jocelyne Dakhlia and Malika Zeghal will show, the current situation is in fact much more complex. By taking into account both the "longue durée" (including historical processes pre-dating the colonial period) and contemporary efforts to redefine European identity, this colloquium will attempt to position the question of public Islam in Europe beyond the antagonistic logic of mutual exclusion between East and West,
Democracy and its "Other."

"Must an Entente be Cordiale? The Mediterranean Lingua Franca"
Jocelyne Dakhlia, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales

"The Secular State and its Theological Temptations: Rethinking French Secularism"
Professor Malika Zeghal, The Divinity School, University of Chicago


Egypt's Last Two Pyramids: Monuments of Ahmose and Tetisheri

Lecture | Oct 21, 2007 | 2:30 p.m. | Barrows Hall, room 20


Dr. Stephen Harvey, Pennsylvania-Yale-IFA NYU Expedition to Abydos


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, Near Eastern Studies, American Research Center in Egypt, Northern California Chapter


Following the Oil: A Writer's Journey from Firdos Square to Ras Tanura

Lecture | Nov 1, 2007 | 5 – 6:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room 340, The Sultan Room


Peter Mass, Regents Lecturer


Human Rights Center, Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Peter Maass, a contributing writer to The New York Times Magazine and author of a forthcoming book about the geopolitics of oil, will discuss his travels in Iraq, where he covered the American invasion, and Saudi Arabia, where he researched the defining role petroleum plays there. Maass will delve into his experiences reporting on war and resources in the Middle East, examining the ways oil and gas continue to shape the region.


In the Shadow of Armies: From Iraq to Bosnia, the Tactics and Perils of Reporting on War Crimes

Lecture | Nov 7, 2007 | 4 – 6 p.m. | North Gate Hall, room Library


Peter Maass, Regents Lecturer


Human Rights Center, International and Area Studies (IAS), Journalism, Graduate School of, Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, Peace and Conflict Studies


Peter Maass will discuss the difficulties reporters confront as they cover war crimes in the world’s conflict zones. Drawing on first-hand experience in the Middle East and the Balkans, Maass will describe his methods for dealing with wary soldiers and freelance insurgents. He will describe his efforts to chronicle the killings of civilians by American Marines during the Iraq invasion, as well as his detention by Serbian paramilitaries while looking for a secret prison camp in Bosnia. His talk will illuminate the realities of reporting in war zones where armies and insurgents alike often regard reporters as hostile partisans.


Of Cities of the Far West (al-Maghrib al-Aqsa): The Essence of Fez

Lecture | Nov 8, 2007 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room 340


Professor Said Ennahid, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Al Akhawayn University, Ifrane, Morocco


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


This is a cultural-historical analysis of Islamic urbanism in the Maghrib (Morocco) with an emphasis on the city of Fez, past and present. Several lines of evidence will be drawn upon including archaeology, historiography, architectural history, and popular culture.


Roots and Branches: Transformations of Mobility, Identity, and the Sacred in Europe and the Middle East

Lecture | Nov 15, 2007 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room 340


Professor Galit Hasan-Rokem, Visiting Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California at Berkeley, Departments of Hebrew Literature and Jewish & Comparative Folklore, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, Helen Diller Family Israeli Visiting Professor Program


Excavations at Tudjoi: Update on the El-Hibeh Project

Lecture | Nov 18, 2007 | 2:30 p.m. | Barrows Hall, room 20


Dr. Carol Redmount, Associate Professor of Egyptian Archaeology, U.C. Berkeley


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, Near Eastern Studies, American Research Center in Egypt, Northern California Chapter


Gray Cities: The New Geopolitics of Invisibility

Lecture | Nov 29, 2007 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room 340


Professor Oren Yiftachel, Department of Geography, Ben Gurion University, Israel


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Cities and Fundamentalisms

Conference/Symposium | Nov 30, 2007 | 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. | Wurster Hall, room Wurster Auditorium


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, International Association for the Study of Traditional Environments (IASTE), Center for South Asian Studies (CSAS), Middle East Program (MEP), Comparative Urban Studies Project (CUSP) of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (WWICS)


In partnership with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (WWICS), CMES presents a joint research project to examine “Cities and Fundamentalisms.” This collaboration will undertake a serious study of the intellectual and practical challenges posed by fundamentalist groups, movements, and organizations with a special, but not exclusive focus on religious ones with the intent of understanding how they are affected by the urban condition and how they in turn impact the urban landscape. The project encourages disciplinary and interdisciplinary scholarship pertaining to popular religious movements that works at the intersection of urban studies and identity studies.

This conference is held November 30th through December 1st.


The Night of the Counting of the Years

Film - Feature | Dec 9, 2007 | 2 – 5 p.m. | Barrows Hall, room 20


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, American Research Center in Egypt, Northern California Chapter


Marie A. Buttery Student Prize and Lecture

Lecture | Jan 27, 2008 | 2:30 p.m. | Barrows Hall, room 20


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, American Research Center in Egypt


THE CENTER FOR MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES AT U.C. BERKELEY IS A CO-SPONSOR OF THE FALL LECTURE SERIES OF THE AMERICAN RESEARCH CENTER IN EGYPT, NORTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTER. ALL LECTURES TAKE PLACE ON SUNDAYS AT
2:30 P.M. IN 20 BARROWS HALL.


The Rabbi and the Sheikh: A Tale of an Inter-Faith Quest and Human Relations in Eighteenth-Century Damascus

Lecture | Jan 31, 2008 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens


Professor Zvi Zohar, Faculty of Law and Faculty of Jewish Studies; Bar Ilan University


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


An amazing account, published in 1842 by a leading Sephardic rabbi of Jerusalem, paints a fascinating picture of a personal, intellectual and spiritual relationship between rabbi Moshe Galante (chief rabbi of Damascus in the late 18th century) and a contemporary Muslim Sufi Sheikh. The course of that relationship, culminating in a joint mystic-spiritual journey, provides insights relevant to Muslim-Jewish religious encounter and dialogue then – and now. We will read the original text (in Prof. Zohar’s English translation) and discuss its implications.


Turkish Christians and German Muslims: Cultural Racism, Fears of Religious Conversion, and National Security in the New Europe

Lecture | Feb 14, 2008 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens


Professor Esra Ozyurek, Department of Anthropology, University of California, San Diego


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


At the turn of the twentyfirst century in two secular countries, Turkey
and Germany, converts to minority religions have been officially defined
as threats to national security. In this presentation Professor Ozyurek will explore the terms
and conditions of this emergent fear of religious converts in two
countries as a window to the shift from biological racism towards cultural
racism in the post-Cold War European political discourse.


Ashura: Blood and Beauty

Film - Short | Feb 21, 2008 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Following the biggest Shia ceremony in South Lebanon over three years, this contemporary look at the 1300-year-old Ashura Muslim ritual shows that a mix of modernity and tradition in Lebanon has made Ashura a platform for young people to meet each other. This short documentary reveals a side to Ashura that the world has not yet seen, a side that is not bloody and violent but rather ambiguous and compelling.


Tender is the Wolf

Film - Feature | Feb 21, 2008 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


This dark nocturnal adventure through the streets of the Tunisian capital by rising Tunisian director Jilani Saadi, follows a group of outcasts and a young prostitute whose fates interconnect after an argument turns ugly and she is brutally raped by several of the men. A departure from more common depictions of the dispossessed in the Arab World, Tender is the Wolf exposes the rawness, despair and alienation plaguing the lives of the poor in big cities.


The Satellite Survey of Western Thebes: A Horus-Eye View of Theban Tombs

Lecture | Feb 24, 2008 | 2:30 p.m. | Barrows Hall, room 20


Dr. Peter Piccioni, Associate Professor of Comparative Ancient History, University of Charleston.


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, American Research Center in Egypt


THE CENTER FOR MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES AT U.C. BERKELEY IS A CO-SPONSOR OF THE FALL LECTURE SERIES OF THE AMERICAN RESEARCH CENTER IN EGYPT, NORTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTER. ALL LECTURES TAKE PLACE ON SUNDAYS AT
2:30 P.M. IN 20 BARROWS HALL.


Democratization in the Arab World: Morocco’s Failing Transition

Special Event | Feb 28, 2008 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens


Presented by Aboubakr Jamaï


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Aboubakr Jamaï is a leading Moroccan intellectual and former publisher of Morocco's groundbreaking weekly newspaper Le Journal Hebdomadaire and its sister publication, Assahifa al-Ousbouiya. He will discuss democratization and economic development in Morocco with an emphasis on the interplay of political liberalization and economic growth.


Wounded Modernities: Colonialism, Nationalism, and the Rise of Modern Egyptian Literary Thought, 1798-1919

Lecture | Mar 6, 2008 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens


Professor Mohammed Salama, Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, San Francisco State University


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Professor Salama will discuss the rise of modern intellectual thinking in colonial Egypt and its impact on questions of literary modernity and nationalism from the time of the French invasion to the1919 Revolution. Central to the general argument is the discursive interdisciplinarity between history and literature. He offers a reading of five texts, both “fictional” and “non-fictional,” that refer to the Denshawai affair that took place in Egypt in 1906 and its appropriation in colonial and post-colonial narratives. He investigates how cumulative representations of the Denshawai affair--in newspaper reports and editorials, poems, songs, speeches, and sermons--reflect the manner in which various classes (Ottoman, Muslim, Coptic, non-Coptic Christian, and secular political elites as ell as peasants) contributed to a nationalist rubric for the first time in the history of modern Egypt.


Blogging in the Arab World

Lecture | Mar 12, 2008 | 12 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340


Mr. Hossam El Hamalawy, International Visiting Scholar, Graduate School of Journalism, University of California at Berkeley


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Noontime Lecture Series in Arab Studies


No Sex in the City: The Generation of Secular Women in the PLO

Lecture | Mar 13, 2008 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens


Professor Suad Amiry, Author and Architect, RIWAQ: The Centre for Architectural Conservation in Ramallah


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Suad Amiry architect and author of "Sharon and My Mother- in-Law", presents her new book "No Sex in the City" (not published in English yet only in Italian).Through the intimate and personal stories of her menopausal women friends (the PLO generation) Amiry tells the social and political life in the dramatically changing Middles East. Through childhood and coming of age vignettes of ten Middle Eastern women (from different parts of the world and of different backgrounds) the book covers important political events which span from WWII until the day Hamas was elected in January 2005. Around an oval diner table at the "In" Darna Restaurant in Ramallah, a dozen or so women meet every month to chat laugh and sometime even cry. What bonds these women together are there shared past political and social activism and problematic Palestine of today.


On the Path of the Novel: Tradition and Transformation of the ‘bildung’ in Arabic Fiction

Lecture | Mar 19, 2008 | 12 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens


Dr. Maria Elena Paniconi, Sultan Post Doctoral Fellow, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, University of California at Berkeley


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Noontime Lecture Series in Arab Studies


Salata Baladi

Film - Documentary | Mar 20, 2008 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Egypt was not always hostage to the myth of being a homogenous society. Rather, it was once a multi-ethnic and religiously heterogeneous society. Salata Baladi is the personal history of the filmmaker's grandmother, Mary, as told to her grandson, Nabeel. Like many Egyptians born at the end of a century filled with multiple waves of immigration, religious conversions, and mixed marriages, Nabeel is a mix of Egyptian, Italian, Palestinian, and Lebanese identities, with some Russian, Caucasian, Turkish, and Spanish inherited from Muslim, Christian and Jewish ancestors. As Mary weaves her way through the family tales, she bumps into her own fears and continued silence shrouding the Israeli branch of her family. In an act of solidarity with the Palestinian people, Mary has boycotted her family in Israel for 55 long years. Inspired by the telling of her own stories and the fresh perspective her ten-year-old grandson brings to them, she and her loving, eclectic circle of friends and family engage in breaking one of the most vicious taboos in modern Egypt.


Politics of Placement: The Development of the Theban Necropolis in the New Kingdom

Lecture | Mar 30, 2008 | 2:30 p.m. | Barrows Hall, room 20


Dr. J.J. Shirley, Assistant Professor of Egyptology, University of Swansea


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, American Research Center in Egypt


THE CENTER FOR MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES AT U.C. BERKELEY IS A CO-SPONSOR OF THE FALL LECTURE SERIES OF THE AMERICAN RESEARCH CENTER IN EGYPT, NORTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTER. ALL LECTURES TAKE PLACE ON SUNDAYS AT
2:30 P.M. IN 20 BARROWS HALL.


Oral History and Oral Historians in Afghanistan

Lecture | Apr 3, 2008 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens


Professor Margaret Mills, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, Ohio State University


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


In the aftermath of 30 years of war and population displacement, oral history is a matter of concern to many Afghans, but that history remains fresh and contested. Truth and reconciliation processes have not surfaced as a cultural or governmental priority; rather past violations of human rights are minimized by present political actors. Under these conditions, a small group of Kabul University students and graduates have acquired skills and undertaken projects in oral history documentation, and some initiatives by foreigners also go forward.


Between One State and Two: The Political and Economic Future of Israel & Palestine

Special Event | Apr 10, 2008 | 5:30 p.m. | Faculty Club, room Great Hall


Professor Arie Arnon, Visiting Professor, Department of Economics, Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, University of California at Berkeley


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


This annual lecture is made possible by the Helen Diller Family Visiting Israeli Professor Program.

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is neither a purely territorial war, as some have argued, nor merely the result of disagreements about human or political rights. It is also an important economic dimension. Any imagined agreement between the two sides, assuming there will be one, must be conceptualized in terms of two possible schemes: a) ‘Two States’, i.e. the division of the land into two states and two economic sovereign entities or b) ‘One State’, i.e. the establishment of a single political and economic entity. Although Israeli policy since 1967 has repudiated both the ‘Two’ and the ‘One’, it changes character and formulations from time to time, as do Palestinian positions. This lecture will review both past transitions and current issues to be addressed in any future agreement, including the question of borders, Jerusalem, and the 1948 refugees. Special attention will be paid to the economic aspects of these issues, such as trade regimes, labour links, economic borders, and financial and monetary arrangements. It will also suggest the necessary conditions for economic development to ensure sovereignty for both Israelis and Palestinians.


Beloved Beasts: Ancient Egyptian Animal Mummies

Lecture | Apr 13, 2008 | 2:30 p.m. | Barrows Hall, room 20


Dr. Salima Ikram, Professor of Egyptology, American University in Cairo


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, American Research Center in Egypt


THE CENTER FOR MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES AT U.C. BERKELEY IS A CO-SPONSOR OF THE FALL LECTURE SERIES OF THE AMERICAN RESEARCH CENTER IN EGYPT, NORTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTER. ALL LECTURES TAKE PLACE ON SUNDAYS AT
2:30 P.M. IN 20 BARROWS HALL.


Jersusalem: Heights, Warrens, Peripheries, Seams

Lecture | May 1, 2008 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Room, 340 Stephens


Professor Annabel Jane Wharton, Department of Art and Art History, Duke University


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Few cities in the world have been more violent than Jerusalem. Perhaps conquests are the most conspicuous of its lethal episodes: Nebuchadnezzar's destruction of the city in 586 B.C.E.; Titus' brutal capture of the city in 70 C.E.; the bloody ravaging of the city by the Crusaders. Less familiar but more pervasive are the city's internal conflicts. Professor Wharton suggests that violence in Jerusalem, and perhaps elsewhere, is conditioned by buildings and terrain as well as by politics. For the sake of discussion, she proposes a speculative typology of topographical ebullition. She links the spatial categories of this scheme-heights, warrens, peripheries, seams-to specific social groups and to particular expressions of violence from the deep past to the present.
Whether this scheme is at all useful in thinking through violence in Jerusalem or any other urban setting may be decided in discussion.


Christians Lost in the Desert: Work at Kharga Oasis

Lecture | May 18, 2008 | 2:30 p.m. | Barrows Hall, room 20


Dr. Eugene Cruz-Uribe, Professor Emeritus, Department of History, Northern Arizona University


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, Near Eastern Studies, American Research Center in Egypt


THE CENTER FOR MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES AT U.C. BERKELEY IS A CO-SPONSOR OF THE FALL LECTURE SERIES OF THE AMERICAN RESEARCH CENTER IN EGYPT, NORTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTER. ALL LECTURES TAKE PLACE ON SUNDAYS AT
2:30 P.M. IN 20 BARROWS HALL.


19th Iranian Women Studies Foundation Conference (IWSF)

Conference/Symposium | July 4 – 6, 2008 every day | Wheeler Auditorium


Cherrie MoragaPartow NoorialaMahsa and Marjan Vahdat


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, ISAA - Student Organization


19th Annual IWSF Conference

This year's theme: The Essential Needs of the Iranian Woman Today

Keynote Speaker - Cherrie Moraga
Other speakers from Iran, Canada, France and Germany
Musical Performances and Middle East Panel

The Iranian Women's Studies Foundation (IWSF) is a non-profit organization. It has no affiliation to any political or religious group or organization, and aims to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas on issues related to Iranian women, to disseminate information on Iranian women's achievements, and to establish a network of communication among communities of Iranian women the world over. The main activity of IWSF consists of annual international conferences wherein a theme related to Iranian women is approached through scholarly presentations, art exhibitions, and artistic or dramatic performances.

Conference is open to everyone. Discount for students.


Excavations at the Amenhotep III Mortuary Temple at Thebes

Lecture | Aug 24, 2008 | 1:30 p.m. | Barrows Hall, room 20 Barrows Hall


Dr. Hourig Sourouzian, German Archaeological Institute, Dr. Rainier Stadelmann, Director Emeritus, German Archaeological Institute, Cairo


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for, American Research Center in Egypt


Bent Familia : Film Series

Film - Series | Sep 4, 2008 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Conference Room/ Stephens 340


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Tunisia - 1997 - 105 Minutes - Arabic
Bent Familia follows the stories of two Tunisian women and an Algerian refugee as they question their lives, relationships and the societal limitations they live under.


The Day I Became a Woman : Film Series

Film - Series | Sep 11, 2008 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, room Sultan Conference Room/ Stephens 340


Middle Eastern Studies, Center for


Iran – 2001 – 78 Minutes – Persian
The Day I Became A Woman is an Iranian drama that tells three stories, each depicting a different stage in the lives of Iranian women.