Critic’s choice

It’s all happening at Berkeley

Critic’s choice

Science@Cal: Searching for dark matter

Wednesday, March 1 | 7-8:30 p.m. | Restaurant Valparaiso, 1403 Solano Ave, Albany
What is dark matter? For decades, firm astronomical evidence from observations of stars and galaxies has indicated that most of the matter in the universe cannot be seen directly in telescopes. Instead, this matter must be observed indirectly through its gravitational pull on the objects that we can see. This is how the term “dark matter” was coined…But how do we search for something we can’t see? Explore these questions with UC Berkeley astrophysicist Matt Pyle.MORE about Searching for dark matter

Panel discussion: The design of everyday life

Wednesday, March 1 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Moffitt Undergraduate Library | Note change in date
Everywhere we turn, our everyday experience of the world is being transfigured by the advent of startling new technologies. But at what cost? In this urgent and revelatory excavation of the Information Age, leading technology thinker Adam Greenfield forces us to rethink our relationship with the networked objects, services and spaces that define our lives, as well as the Silicon Valley consensus that is determining the shape of our future.MORE about The design of everyday life

Lecture: Marlon James

Wednesday, March 1 | 8 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
Jamaican author Marlon James, whose monumental latest novel, A Brief History of Seven Killings, earned him the prestigious Man Booker Prize, visits campus for a discussion with Chancellor Nicholas B. Dirks as part of the Berkeley Talks speaker series. James will discuss his writing process, as well as the themes that underlie his celebrated works of fiction: the colonial history of the Caribbean, race and gender in the US and UK, and hip-hop and reggae youth subcultures. MORE about Marlon James

Exhibit: Andy Warhol, still lifes and portraits

November 23, 2016 – March 12, 2017 every Sunday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
A prominent figure of the American Pop Art movement, Andy Warhol (1928–1987) was one of the first to integrate fine art with celebrity culture, media spectacle, and mass production. This exhibition presents a selection of new gifts to BAMPFA from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, on view here for the first time, alongside previous gifts to the collection. The prints on display span over a decade of the artist’s career, from 1964, the year Warhol founded his legendary Factory, to 1977—a period marked by an upheaval in cultural and societal norms.MORE about Andy Warhol, still lifes and portraits

Special event: Water's extreme journey

January 29 – April 30, 2017 every Sunday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday | 10 a.m.-5 p.m. | Lawrence Hall of Science
Become a raindrop and go on an interactive adventure through a water-cycle-themed maze. Have fun riding the Watershed Zip Line, walk through a giant wetland, and snap a pic of your family "swimming" with the dolphins—all while developing a deeper understanding of your place in the water ecosystem.MORE about Water's extreme journey

Exhibit: War Ink

November 1, 2016 – May 1, 2017 every day | Brown Gallery (east wing) Doe Library
Photographs from the celebrated War Ink Project will be on display in Berkeley’s Doe Library. The exhibit features striking images of tattoos that express the impact of combat experiences on California veterans. Jason Deitch, co-creator of War Ink and a Cal veteran, hopes the display will “bridge the divide between the veterans and civilian communities.” MORE about War Ink

Exhibit: Hippie Modernism, cinema and counterculture

February 11 – May 13, 2017 every Sunday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Cinema’s radical streak goes back to its earliest beginnings, but the period explored in the exhibit Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia was an unusually fertile time for politically charged, aesthetically innovative filmmaking. Encompassing documentary, fiction, and experimental cinema—often in the course of a single feature—the films in this series intersected with and actively participated in emerging counterculture movements.MORE about Hippie Modernism, cinema and counterculture

Author talk: Clair Brown, Buddhist Economics

Thursday, March 2 | 3-5 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall
Clair Brown, Professor of economics at UC Berkeley, will discuss her new book, Buddhist Economics: An Enlightened Approach to the Dismal Science. Traditional economics measures the ways in which we spend our income, and doesn’t attribute worth to the crucial human interactions that give our lives meaning. Clair Brown, an economist at UC Berkeley and a practicing Buddhist, has developed a holistic model, one based on the notion that quality of life should be measured by more than national income. MORE about Clair Brown, <em>Buddhist Economics</em>

Colloquium: How will UC Merced grow?

Thursday, March 2 | 12-1 p.m. | Academic Innovation Studio, Dwinelle 117 Dwinelle Hall
As a means to accommodate the projected growth of eligible students, the University of California opened its tenth campus in 2005. The long-range goal for the UC Merced embraced a vision of a full-service research university that would serve 25,000 students at full capacity. Today’s challenge is how to meet those ambitious expectations in an era of diminished state support for higher education.MORE about How will UC Merced grow?

Colloquium: The history of inequality

Thursday, March 2 | 3-4:30 p.m. | Heyns Room Faculty Club
This colloquium with Walter Scheidel, Professor of Classics and History, Stanford University, will also include discussion by Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman of UC Berkeley and Greg Clark of UC Davis.MORE about The history of inequality

Theater: Polaroid Stories

Friday, March 3 | 8-10 p.m. | Zellerbach Playhouse
Based on real life stories of street kids, and drawing from Ovid’s Metamorphoses myths, Naomi Iizuka’s Polaroid Stories blends poetry and profanity to explore how young people pushed to the edge of society come to understand their lives amid anger, love both lost and found, violence, homelessness, ambition, and addiction.MORE about Polaroid Stories

Author talk: Paul Blustein, Laid Low

Friday, March 3 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall
The latest book by journalist Paul Blustein goes behind the scenes at the highest levels of global economic policy making, Laid Low chronicles the crisis in the Euro Zone through the prism of the world’s financial firefighter, the International Monetary Fund. MORE about Paul Blustein, <em>Laid Low</em>

Dance: Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo

Friday, March 3 | 8 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
The all-male ballet troupe affectionately known as the "Trocks" traffics deliriously and artfully in "the ridiculous and the sublime" (Financial Times). The troupe performs a sophisticated form of ballet parody, en travesti, and recently celebrated 40 years as an internationally adored cultural phenomenon.MORE about Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo

Music: Takács Quartet, Beethoven's string quartets

Saturday, March 4 | 8 p.m. | Hertz Concert Hall
Takács violinist Edward Dusinberre on the Beethoven Quartets: "Playing the works is a thrilling and daunting experience. We feel like tennis players forced out of position, obliged to draw on our physical and mental resources to raise our game. We have rehearsed this music for many years, but performing a Beethoven quartet still inspires an exhilarating sense of danger" (The Guardian, London). MORE about Takács Quartet, Beethoven's string quartets

Botanical garden: Natural dyes

Saturday, March 4 | 1-4 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden
Learn how to dye with seeds. We'll be using Annatto, Acorns, Avocado, and Hopi Black Dye Sunflower to create a variety of shades.MORE about Natural dyes

Dance: Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo

Saturday, March 4 | 8 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
The "unspeakably talented" (Calgary Herald) all-male ballet troupe affectionately known as the "Trocks" traffics deliriously and artfully in "the ridiculous and the sublime" (Financial Times). The troupe performs a sophisticated form of ballet parody, en travesti, and recently celebrated 40 years as an internationally adored cultural phenomenon.MORE about Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo

Music: Takács Quartet, Beethoven's string quartets

Sunday, March 5 | 3 p.m. | Hertz Concert Hall
Takács violinist Edward Dusinberre on the Beethoven Quartets: "Playing the works is a thrilling and daunting experience. We feel like tennis players forced out of position, obliged to draw on our physical and mental resources to raise our game. We have rehearsed this music for many years, but performing a Beethoven quartet still inspires an exhilarating sense of danger" (The Guardian, London). MORE about Takács Quartet, Beethoven's string quartets

Dance: Balé Folclórico da Bahia

Sunday, March 5 | 7 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
A rare opportunity to see Brazil's premiere dance and music ensemble. With Herança Sagrada (Sacred Heritage), the 32 dancers, instrumentalists, and singers of the acclaimed folkloric dance company Balé Folclórico da Bahia honor the African roots of Brazilian culture. The troupe explores the music and dance of the Candomblé religion, the sinuous martial art capoeira, and the ubiquitous samba.MORE about Balé Folclórico da Bahia

Theater: Polaroid Stories

Sunday, March 5 | 2-4 p.m. | Zellerbach Playhouse
Based on real life stories of street kids, and drawing from Ovid’s Metamorphoses myths, Naomi Iizuka’s Polaroid Stories blends poetry and profanity to explore how young people pushed to the edge of society come to understand their lives amid anger, love both lost and found, violence, homelessness, ambition, and addiction.MORE about Polaroid Stories

Lecture: The native and the refugee

Monday, March 6 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall
The Native and the Refugee is a multi-media film and research project that compares the Palestinian and Native American experience by examining the infrastructure, politics, and geography of American Indian reservations alongside Palestinian refugee camps. Malek Rasamny is a researcher, writer, filmmaker and programmer based in New York and Lebanon. He was a founding member of the Red Channels Film Collective and the LERFE space in Harlem, New York.MORE about The native and the refugee

ONGOING: Exhibits around campus >