<< Wednesday, September 18, 2019 >>

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

Combinatorics Reading Seminar: Limit shape for random partitions

Seminar | September 18 | 11:10 a.m.-12:10 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 David Keating, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

By following the work of Logan-Shepp and Kerov-Vershik, we will derive limit shape for partitions under the Plancherel measure as the size of the partition goes to infinity. As a consequence, we will understand some asymptotics of uniformly random permutations. If time permits, we will discuss Hammerley's interacting particle process.

The Skills You Bring

Workshop | September 18 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 24 University Hall

 Human Resources

The skills you enjoy and feel confident about contribute to strong performance and high satisfaction. Explore your transferable skills – the ones that support your career mobility and adaptability.

Mvz Lunch Seminar - Robert Fleischer: “Birds of Paradise Lost: Evolution, Extinction and Conservation of Hawaii's Birds”

Seminar | September 18 | 12-1 p.m. | University Press (2120 Berkeley Way), 3101 VLSB, Grinnell-Miller Library

 Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

MVZ Lunch is a graduate level seminar series (IB264) based on current and recent vertebrate research. Professors, graduate students, staff, and visiting researchers present on current and past research projects. The seminar meets every Wednesday from 12- 1pm in the Grinnell-Miller Library. Enter through the MVZ's Main Office, 3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, and please let the receptionist...   More >

MVZ LUNCH SEMINAR - Alex Hon-Tsen Yu: Title TBA

Seminar | September 18 | 12-1 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, 3101 VLSB, Grinnell-Miller Library

 Alex Hon Tsen Yu

 Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

MVZ Lunch is a graduate level seminar series (IB264) based on current and recent vertebrate research. Professors, graduate students, staff, and visiting researchers present on current and past research projects. The seminar meets every Wednesday from 12- 1pm in the Grinnell-Miller Library. Enter through the MVZ's Main Office, 3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, and please let the receptionist...   More >

Life course origins of dementia for black and white Americans: A Demography Brown Bag Talk

Colloquium | September 18 | 12-1 p.m. | 2232 Piedmont, Seminar Room

 Mark Hayward, Professor, Sociology, University of Texas at Austin

 Population Science, Department of Demography

Mark Hayward is a professor of sociology, a faculty research associate of the Population Research Center, and director of the Population Health Initiative at the University of Texas at Austin.
His primary research addresses how life course exposures and events influence the morbidity and mortality experiences of the adult population.

Plant and Microbial Biology Seminar: "Milkweeds and mustards: a tale of two toxins"

Seminar | September 18 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Noah Whiteman, Associate Professor, UC Berkeley

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

Noah Whiteman, Ph.D. is an associate professor in the Department of Integrative Biology at UC Berkeley and the Principal Investigator of the Whiteman Laboratory. Their research follows from Charles Darwin and Alfred Russell Wallace, who focused on the evolution of traits shaped by biotic interactions (interactions between organisms).

Topology Seminar (Introductory Talk): Introduction to groups acting on hyperbolic metric spaces

Seminar | September 18 | 2:10-3 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Alexander Rasmussen, Yale University

 Department of Mathematics

In this talk we will give a broad overview of group actions on hyperbolic metric spaces. We will discuss various types of actions which are in some sense "nice" and the consequences of a group admitting a nice action on a hyperbolic space. Finally, we will discuss the applications of actions on hyperbolic metric spaces to the bounded cohomology of a group.

Model Theory Seminar: Model theory of the j function

Seminar | September 18 | 2:20-3:30 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Sebastian Eterovic, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

There has been a lot of work in model theory devoted to studying exponential fields, which has produced many important results in the area. Inspired by this, I will present some model-theoretic approaches to the j function (from the theory of elliptic curves), and I will also present various results which mirror some of those in exponential fields.

BLISS Seminar: Sample complexity of mixture of sparse linear regressions

Seminar | September 18 | 3-4 p.m. | 400 Cory Hall

 Arya Mazumdar, University of Massachusetts Amherst

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

In the problem of learning mixtures of linear regressions, the goal is to learn a collection of signal vectors from a sequence of (possibly noisy) linear measurements, where each measurement is evaluated on an unknown signal drawn uniformly from this collection. This setting is quite expressive and has been studied both in terms of practical applications and for the sake of establishing...   More >

General selection models: Bernstein duality and minimal ancestral structures

Seminar | September 18 | 3:10-4 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Sebastian Hummel, Bielefeld University

 Department of Statistics

We construct a sequence of Moran models that converges for large populations under suitable conditions to the $\Lambda$-Wright-Fisher process with a drift that is vanishing at the boundaries. The genealogical structure inherent in the graphical representation of the finite population models leads in the large population limit to a generalisation of the ancestral selection graph of Krone and...   More >

Spaces of decision in the cybernetic age

Colloquium | September 18 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 575 McCone Hall

 David Bates, Department of Rhetoric, University of California Berkeley

 Department of Geography

How can we conceptualize decision in the automatic age? When human brains are understood as largely unconscious systems where the "will" is merely an illusion, and computer algorithms make decisions and predict our futures, can we think politics -- or what Carl Schmitt called "the political" -- in any coherent way? In this talk, I will track some historical entanglements, where decision is...   More >

Berkeley Number Theory Learning Seminar: Grothendieck-Lefschetz trace formula

Seminar | September 18 | 3:40-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall | Note change in time

 Ian Gleason, University of California, Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

Indigenous Bay Area: An On the Same Page panel

Panel Discussion | September 18 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315 (Maude Fife)

 Vincent Medina, Chochenyo Ohlone, Muwekma Ohlone Tribe, Mak-'amham; Peter Nelson, Coast Miwok, Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, San Diego State, American Indian Studies; Linda Yamane, Rumsien Ohlone

 Line Mikkelsen, Professor, Linguistics Department, UC Berkeley

 College of Letters & Science

This panel discussion will explore aspects of Indigenous culture, landscape, language, and sovereignty before colonization, through the historic period and the present day, and going forward into the future. The complexity, vibrancy, and continued vitality of basketry and other fine arts, ceremonies and songs, foodways, landscape and resource management, languages, and material culture of...   More >

 Free and open to all on a first-come first-seated basis.

Ohlone Mural by Jean LaMarr

EECS Colloquium: Moore’s Law is Not Dead

Colloquium | September 18 | 4-5 p.m. | Soda Hall, 306 (HP Auditorium)

 Jim Keller, Intel

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

Moore’s observation has continued to be challenged and questioned. And yet, today hundreds of billions of dollars are being invested in silicon technology that will enable feature sizes just a few atoms wide. To understand this unabated growth in computing, one needs to deconstruct the Moore’s Law transistor count exponential as the output of numerous individual innovations across the computing...   More >

Regression analysis of longitudinal data with omitted asynchronous longitudinal covariate: Neyman Seminar

Seminar | September 18 | 4-5 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Hongyuan Cao, Florida State University

 Department of Statistics

Extended follow-up with longitudinal data is common in many medical investigations. In regression analyses, a longitudinal covariate may be omitted, often because it is not measured synchronously with the longitudinal response. Naive approach that simply ignores the omitted longitudinal covariate can lead to biased estimators. In this article, we establish conditions under which estimation is...   More >

Topology Seminar: Analogs of the curve graph for infinite type surfaces

Seminar | September 18 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 3 Evans Hall

 Alexander Rasmussen, Yale University

 Department of Mathematics

The mapping class group of a finite type surface acts on its curve graph. This action has proven to be crucial for understanding the mapping class group and many of the applications rely on the fact that the curve graph is hyperbolic and infinite diameter. We will describe several actions of mapping class groups of infinite type surfaces on hyperbolic graphs analogous to the curve graph. In...   More >

Artist’s Talk: Kader Attia in Conversation with Stefania Pandolfo

Presentation | September 18 | 6 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

MATRIX artist Kader Attia is joined in conversation by Stefania Pandolfo, a professor of anthropology at UC Berkeley. They will discuss Attia’s approach to the concept of repair and healing after physical and psychological injury, particularly in a postcolonial context.

Pandolfo’s research involves the study of theories and forms of subjectivity and their contemporary predicaments in the...   More >