<< Tuesday, April 16, 2019 >>

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Ernest S. Kuh Distinguished Lecture: From Cory Hall to Silicon Valley: Building a Startup that Thrives

Lecture | April 16 | 12-1 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium, 3rd floor

 John Georges Ph.D., '94 EECS, Partner, QMC Telecom; David Curtrer, Ph.D., '98 EECS, CEO, Kumu Networks

 College of Engineering, Eta Kappa Nu (HKN)

In their talk, “From Cory Hall to Silicon Valley: Building a Startup that Thrives,” they will talk about Berkeley Engineering's role in their careers. While John and Dave were still graduate students at Berkeley, they founded LGC Wireless, a telecom equipment manufacturer. They also co-founded NextG Networks, which sold to Crown Castle for $1 billion in 2012. We are delighted to welcome them back...   More >

Deceptive Stability? Germany in Chancellor Angela Merkel’s Last Term

Lecture | April 16 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Niko Switek, University of Washington

 Institute of European Studies, Pacific Regional Office of the GHI Washington, Center for German and European Studies

Looking from the US to Germany many observers admire chancellor Angela Merkel as an element of stability in turbulent times. She is in her fourth term as chancellor and recently gave a passionate speech defending multilateralism and free trade at the Munich Security Conference - once main pillars of US foreign policy.
Yet politics in Germany turned turbulent themselves as result of the refugee...   More >

Niko Switek

Dancing Loyalty: Revolutionary Movements in Cuba after 1959

Lecture | April 16 | 4 p.m. |  2334 Bowditch (Center for Latin American Studies)

 Center for Latin American Studies

After the 1959 Cuban Revolution, new professional opportunities opened up for dancers of African descent. As Fidel Castro desegregated public parks and beaches, Cuban choreographers founded new companies with racially diverse casts.
Elizabeth Schwall is a Visiting Lecturer of Latin American History at UC Berkeley and a Fellow at the Center for Ballet and the Arts at New York University.

An integrated Cuban dance troupe employs revolutionary imagery. (Photo courtesy of Danza Contemporánea de Cuba, Havana, Cuba.)

The Last Whalers: Telling the Story of One of the World's Last Whaling Tribes

Lecture | April 16 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Doug Bock Clark, journalist

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Graduate School of Journalism

Award-winning journalist Doug Bock Clark will discuss his book The Last Whalers, which chronicles three years in the lives of the people of Lamalera, on the island of Lembata in eastern Indonesia, who hunt sperm whales with bamboo harpoons as they reckon with the encroachment of the modern world.

Doug Bock Clark

Knowing Me, Knowing You: Self-Knowledge, Authority, and Dialogue in Early Plato

Lecture | April 16 | 5-7 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Fiona Leigh, University College, London

 Department of Philosophy

Lunacy Administration: Racism and the Haunting of American Psychiatry: A Lecture by Mab Segrest

Lecture | April 16 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife room

 Mab Segrest

 HIFIS Disability Studies Cluster

What does it mean that a culture that promoted slavery and lynching decided who was and was not sane? What do we see from an asylum in a slave-drenched culture such as Georgia's about how racism haunts American psychiatry in ways that impact us profoundly today? What can we know about the lives that patients lived in an institution segregated by race and gender, and in what ways did they resist,...   More >

Lunacy Administration: Racism and the Haunting of American Psychiatry: A Lecture by Mab Segrest

Lecture | April 16 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maude Fife Room, 315 Wheeler

 Mab Segrest

 Disability Studies Program

What do we see from an asylum in a slave-drenched culture such as Georgia's about how racism haunts American psychiatry in ways that impact us profoundly today? Mab Segrest addresses these questions based on her fifteen-year study of Georgia's state mental hospital at MIlledgeville, once the largest in the world, with a graveyard of 25,000 people.

Lunacy Administration: Racism and the Haunting of American Psychiatry

Lecture | April 16 | 5 p.m. | 315 Wheeler Hall

 Mab Segrest

 Department of Psychology

Mab Segrest for four decades has worked in a range of settings organizing, teaching, and shaping scholarship as a public intellectual. Her new book, Administrations of Lunacy, will come out next Spring from the New Press. It is based on Segrest's 15-year study of the archives of Georgia's state mental hospital at Milledgeville. A 25th anniversary edition of Segrest’s award-winning book, Memoir of...   More >

2019 Taubman Lectures: The Navel of the Dream: Freud's Jewish Languages

Lecture | April 16 | 5:30-9 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Professor Naomi Seidman, University of Toronto

 The Herman P. and Sophia Tuabman Chair in Jewish Studies, The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

The 2019 Taubman Lectures
These lectures explore the role of Jewish languages in Freud's writings and in the reception and translation of psychoanalysis. Were Hebrew and Yiddish translations a minor episode in the dispersion of psychoanalysis, or do they have a special place in this history, as the "lost originals" of Freud's German writings?

  RSVP online

A Greek officer and an Egyptian lady: Ethnic diversity in a wealthy household in Hellenistic Egypt

Lecture | April 16 | 5:30-8 p.m. | Doe Library, Morrison Library

 Katelijn Vandorpe, Professor of Ancient History, KU Leuven

 Center for the Tebtunis Papyri

When Alexander the Great’s general Ptolemy sets up a new dynasty of pharaohs, many Greeks emigrate to the land of the Nile. In her CTP Distinguished Lecture, Professor Vandorpe outlines the policies of the Ptolemaic kings and queens in this early multicultural society and then focuses on the eventful life of a family that is richly documented by a bilingual papyrus archive. This bicultural...   More >