All events

<< Week of January 28 >>

Monday, January 29, 2018

I see you: Social gaze as a window of opportunity in early brain development

Colloquium | January 29 | 12:15-1:15 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Ronny Geva, The Gonda Brain Research Center, Bar Ilan University, Israel

 Department of Psychology

Social bonding—including the social learning that underpins the creation of early emotional ties between infants and their caretakers—are among the most fundamental developmental processes for human survival and well-being. Social attention is thought to play a crucial role in these processes, but little is known about the neurodevelopmental mechanisms—particularly regarding the involvement of...   More >

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Where

Colloquium | January 30 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Patrick Cavanagh, Department of Psychology, Glendon College and Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College

 Department of Psychology

How do we know where things are? Recent results indicate that an object’s visual location is constructed at a high level where, critically, an object’s motion is discounted to recover its current location, much like we discount the illumination when we perceive color. As a result we sometimes see a target far from its actual location. These predictions operate differently for eye movements,...   More >

Clinical Science Colloquium

Colloquium | January 30 | 3:40-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3105 Beach Room

 Maria Watson Ph.D

 Department of Psychology

In this talk Maria will present an overview of the clinical treatment (individual and group CBT and Motivational Interviewing) and long-term management (Peer Support and Harm Reduction) of Hoarding Disorders. The focus will be on adapting your evidence-based “tool kit” and treatment goals, to work with these often complex and highly comorbid clients, in real life settings.

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Sensory Integration, Density Estimation, and Information Retention

Seminar | January 31 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall

 Joe Makin, UCSF

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

A common task facing computational scientists and, arguably, the brains of primates more generally is to construct models for data, particularly ones that invoke latent variables. Although it is often natural to identify the latent variables of such a model with the true unobserved variables in the world, the correspondence between the two can be more complicated, as when the former are...   More >

Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right

Colloquium | January 31 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Arlie Hochschild, Professor Emerita, UC Berkeley Department of Sociology

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Arlie Hochschild's latest book, Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right (The New Press, September 2016) focuses on the rise of the American right. Based on intensive interviews of Tea Party enthusiasts in Louisiana, conducted over the last five years and focusing on emotions, Hochschild scales an “empathy wall” to learn how to see, think and feel as they do. What do...   More >

Friday, February 2, 2018

“Why The Mind Evolved: The Evolution Of Navigation”: Psychology 229A

Colloquium | February 2 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Lucia Jacobs, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology