Critic’s choice

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Critic’s choice

Seminar: The college dropout scandal

Thursday, March 23 | 12-1 p.m. | Academic Innovation Studio Dwinelle 117 Dwinelle Hall
Only 60% of undergraduates enrolled in bachelor's programs graduate in six years; fewer that 40% of students in community colleges graduate or transfer in three years. The scandal — and it really is a scandal — is that most institutions of higher education aren’t using the tools that have been proven to change the equation. David Kirp of the Goldman School of Public Policy addresses what the dimensions of the college dropout scandal are and what can be done to boost graduation rates and reduce the achievement gap.MORE about The college dropout scandal

Film: A Photographer's Journey

Thursday, March 23 | 5-8 p.m. | Center for Latino Policy Research, 2547 Channing Way, Berkeley
Emmy award winning documentary filmmaker Ray Telles and CLPR artist-in-residence talks about the importance of telling the stories and accomplishments of leaders and artists in our community. Join us for a screening and brief discussion of Ray Telles’ film A Photographer’s Journey, a documentary film that tells the story of Pedro E. Guerrero, a Mexican-American, born and raised in segregated Mesa, Arizona, who had an extraordinary, and often overlooked career as an international photographer.MORE about <em>A Photographer's Journey</em>

Theater: The Othello Project

March 22 – 23, 2017 every day | 8-9 p.m. | Z170 (basement of Zellerbach Hall) Zellerbach Hall
The Othello Project is written and directed by undergraduate Madison Wackerman. It is a devised piece consisting of student experiences, references to the text, and character investigation to examine harmful societal tropes in the white patriarchy in Shakespeare’s Othello that persist today. This piece uses personal accounts and contemporary references to contextualize Shakespeare’s “classic” play in modern America, exploring present-day intersectionality of race and gender. MORE about The Othello Project

Special event: Water's extreme journey

January 29 – April 30, 2017 every Sunday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday | 10 a.m.-5 p.m. | Lawrence Hall of Science
Become a raindrop and go on an interactive adventure through a water-cycle-themed maze. Have fun riding the Watershed Zip Line, walk through a giant wetland, and snap a pic of your family "swimming" with the dolphins—all while developing a deeper understanding of your place in the water ecosystem.MORE about Water's extreme journey

Exhibit: War Ink

November 1, 2016 – May 1, 2017 every day | Brown Gallery (east wing) Doe Library
Photographs from the celebrated War Ink Project will be on display in Berkeley’s Doe Library. The exhibit features striking images of tattoos that express the impact of combat experiences on California veterans. Jason Deitch, co-creator of War Ink and a Cal veteran, hopes the display will “bridge the divide between the veterans and civilian communities.” MORE about War Ink

Exhibit: Hippie Modernism, cinema and counterculture

February 11 – May 13, 2017 every Sunday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Cinema’s radical streak goes back to its earliest beginnings, but the period explored in the exhibit Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia was an unusually fertile time for politically charged, aesthetically innovative filmmaking. Encompassing documentary, fiction, and experimental cinema—often in the course of a single feature—the films in this series intersected with and actively participated in emerging counterculture movements.MORE about Hippie Modernism, cinema and counterculture

Science@Cal: Energy and atmosphere, planning for a safe future

Friday, March 24 | 7-8:30 p.m. | http://www.scarletcityroasting.com/espresso-bar/ Scarlet City Espresso Bar, 3960 Adeline Street, Emeryville
UC Berkeley graduate students Alexis Shusterman and Chris Keckler explore the chemistry of climate science and the physics of safe nuclear reactors. From predicting future temperatures to re-creating pre-historic conditions, computational models are a huge part of how scientists investigate earth’s ever-changing climate. Come learn what drives these models, how they’ve evolved over time, and what researchers are doing to make them even better. It has been proven in full scale experiments that advanced nuclear reactor designs can be engineered so that they remain within all safety limitations during even the most extreme accident scenarios. Explore the physics and engineering choices that go into an inherently safe design, and how these designs differ from current commercial power reactors. MORE about Energy and atmosphere, planning for a safe future

Film: The Great Dictator

Friday, March 24 | 4 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
The physical resemblance between the Little Tramp and another famous man with a small black moustache was not lost on Charlie Chaplin. In his first all-talking picture, he plays a Jewish barber and his double, the dictator Adenoid Hynkel. As Hynkel and his henchmen engineer the persecution of Jews and the invasion of a neighboring nation, the amnesiac barber may be the only person innocent enough to stop them. MORE about <em>The Great Dictator</em>

Theater: William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night

Friday, March 24 | 8 p.m. | Zellerbach Playhouse
Direct from the United Kingdom and making its West Coast debut, Britain's acclaimed Filter Theatre, "a company blessed with wit, style, and a touch of magic" (Daily Telegraph, London), presents its breakneck and explosive production of Shakespeare's masterwork of romance, satire, and mistaken identity. Originally commissioned by the Royal Shakespeare Company, Filter's Twelfth Night enlists a cast of superb actors, with raucous music and rowdy audience participation, in a radical retelling of the Bard's beloved tale.MORE about William Shakespeare's <em>Twelfth Night</em>

Film: The Great Transmission

Saturday, March 25 | 1 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
This award-winning documentary is the story of one Tibetan refugee lama and his efforts to preserve the sacred texts of his tradition. Witnessing the disintegration of his heritage, Tarthang Tulku dedicated his life to restoring a text tradition that was nearly lost during the turbulence of the twentieth century. Working with a handful of volunteers, he would deliver more than 4.25 million books into Tibetan hands in one of the largest free book distributions in history. MORE about <em>The Great Transmission</em>

Music: Milos, from Bach to Beatles

Saturday, March 25 | 8 p.m. | First Congregational Church, 2345 Channing Way, Berkeley
Among the most celebrated classical guitarists working today, the young Montenegrin Milos Karadaglić brings a populist sensibility to his captivating, eclectic programs. Here, joined by a chamber ensemble, he performs major classical works by Granados, Rodrigo, Boccherini, and Albéniz, along with familiar standards from Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico, and stunningly intimate renditions of songs by Lennon and McCartney.MORE about Milos, from Bach to Beatles

Film: Une Femme Douce

Saturday, March 25 | 8:15 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
The suicide of a young wife begins this simple, inscrutable story; afterward, her pawnbroker husband relates the history of their marriage. But his narration necessarily fails to explain the woman whose life we see in flashback, underlining the ultimate privacy of death. MORE about <em>Une Femme Douce</em>

Theater: William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night

Sunday, March 26 | 3 p.m. | Zellerbach Playhouse
Direct from the United Kingdom and making its West Coast debut, Britain's acclaimed Filter Theatre, "a company blessed with wit, style, and a touch of magic" (Daily Telegraph, London), presents its breakneck and explosive production of Shakespeare's masterwork of romance, satire, and mistaken identity. Originally commissioned by the Royal Shakespeare Company, Filter's Twelfth Night enlists a cast of superb actors, with raucous music and rowdy audience participation, in a radical retelling of the Bard's beloved tale.MORE about William Shakespeare's <em>Twelfth Night</em>

Music: National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine

Sunday, March 26 | 3 p.m. | Zellerbach Hall
The distinguished National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine lends its expressive power to a program that includes Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 3 with celebrated Ukrainian soloist Alexei Grynyuk, and Shostakovich's heroic Symphony No. 5. MORE about National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine

Performance: Go Tell It!

Sunday, March 26 | 3 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
In celebration of Women’s History Month, Taiwo Kujichagulia-Seitu and Lyric Performing Arts Academy present Go Tell It!, a Harriet Tubman musical. Shortly before Christmas in 1854, Harriet Tubman discovered that her brothers, enslaved in Maryland, were to be sold at auction on December 26. On December 29, Harriet, her brothers, and several others reached safety in Philadelphia. Go Tell It! tells both the story of this harrowing escape and the larger story of communication along the Underground Railroad through song.MORE about Go Tell It!

Sports: Softball vs. Stanford

Monday, March 27 | 3 p.m. | Levine-Fricke Field
Cal Softball hosts Stanford in conference action at Levine-Fricke Field.MORE about Softball vs. Stanford

Workshop: Representation learning

This workshop will focus on dramatic advances in representation and learning taking place in natural language processing, speech and vision. For instance, deep learning can be thought of as a method that combines the tasks of finding a classifier (which we can think of as the top layer of the deep net) with the task of learning a representation (namely, the representation computed at the last-but-one layer). The workshop will draw a mix of theorists and practitioners.MORE about Representation learning

Lecture: Eric Drooker on the art of political activism

Eric Drooker's drawings and posters are a familiar site in the global street art movement, while his paintings appear frequently on covers of The New Yorker. A Berkeley resident for many years, Drooker was born and raised in New York City, where he began to slap his images on the streets as a teenager. Over time, his reputation as a social critic led to countless editorial illustrations for The Nation, the New York Times, the Progressive, the Village Voice. Drooker won the American Book Award for Flood! A Novel in Pictures, followed by Blood Song, and most recently, Howl: A Graphic Novel. MORE about Eric Drooker on the art of political activism

Film: Pickpocket

Wednesday, March 29 | 7 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
A young recluse, Michel, drawn inexorably to picking pockets, suffers not guilt, but a kind of performance anxiety based on his Nietzschean theories of the superior man. Michel’s bewilderment as to his motivations is as thorough as ours, which is only one of the fascinating aspects of the film, obliquely but famously based on Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment.MORE about <em>Pickpocket</em>

Botanical garden: Gardens for the senses with Javier Mariategui

Thursday, March 30 | 4-6 p.m. | UC Botanical Garden
Spanish landscape designer Javier Mariátegui will talk about his approach to garden design and some of the gardens featured in his book, The Spanish Gardens of Javier Mariátegui: Gardens for the Senses. After completing the landscape gardening and design program at the Escuela de Paisajismo y Jardineria Castillo de Batres in Madrid, Javier worked as a gardener in England. Back in Spain, he founded Jardines de Espana nursery, which employs handicapped children. For the past thirty years, he has created many gardens across Spain and in several other European countries. A reception will follow the talk. MORE about Gardens for the senses with Javier Mariategui

ONGOING: Exhibits around campus >