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Music: Rupa and the April Fishes + Lou Lou and the Gypsy Jivers
Thursday, August 28 | 5:30-7:30 p.m. | Redwood Grove UC Botanical Garden

Rupa and the April FishesEnjoy the sounds of roots rock and Soweto swing in the shade of the redwood grove at UC Berkeley's botanical garden. Rupa and the April Fishes performs, and Lou Lou and the Gypsy Jivers will open.

 $20 Adult,  $18 UCBG Member Adult,  $10 Youth 5-17yrs old
Ticket includes admission to the Botanical Garden before 4:30pm. Redwood Grove doors at 5:00pm. Click the following "online" button to purchase tickets... Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-643-2755.


Lecture: On Argentina
Thursday, August 28 | 6:30 p.m. | Wells Fargo Room Haas School of Business

Buenos AiresSergio Massa is an Argentine National Congressman and the former mayor of Tigre, Argentina. The Financial Times called him “the rising star of Argentine politics.” He will discuss Argentine politics and perspectives for the future.



Lecture: Architecture and unseen power
Thursday, August 28 | 12-1 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

Dana BuntrockBuildings express influences otherwise unseen. They are shaped by laws, subsidies or incentives, and forgotten historical events. Dana Buntrock, professor of architecture at UC Berkeley, will discuss architecture in Japan from a 1960s "Hawaiian" resort to contemporary prefabricated houses. She will demonstrate ways that seemingly odd or unusual approaches result from the political economies of energy use and exploitation.



Panel discussion: 2014-15 venture capital financing
Thursday, August 28 | 6:30-8:30 p.m. | Haas School: Andersen Auditorium

Haas school logoIn 2014 the early stage financing environment exploded with valuations and the number of financings increasing substantially, including several multi-billion dollar fundings. By some measures the number of venture fundings in Q2 of 2014 approached levels not seen since the days of the internet bubble. 2014 also continued a number of trends from prior years: the growing influence of founders/entrepreneurs, the significant growth in the activity of seed/angel investors as well as alternative funding platforms and incubators. Join our panel of expert angel and venture capital investors for a look at early stage investing during the past year and what the future investment environment holds.

 $25 Community/UC Berkeley Alumni,  Free UC Berkeley/UCSF Students, Faculty, and Staff
Registration opens August 6. Register by August 26 online, or by calling 510-642-4255, or by emailing lester@haas.berkeley.edu.


Exhibit: Envisioning Human Rights opening reception
Thursday, August 28 | 5-7 p.m. | Steinhart Courtyard Boalt Hall, School of Law

As part of its 20th Anniversary celebration, the Human Rights Center at the UC Berkeley School of Law presents Envisioning Human Rights, a collection of world-class human rights photography, curated by Pamela Blotner, on exhibit at Boalt Hall, UC Berkeley, from August through October 2014. The exhibition features the work of Mimi Chakarova, Nic Dunlop, Stephen Ferry, Stephen Goldblatt, Ken Light, Susan Meiselas, Thomas Morley, Gilles Peress, Sebastião Salgado, and Jean-Marie Simon.

Please join us for an opening reception. Meet some of the photographers and the show’s curator. We’ll also kick off the silent auction of the photographs during the reception. Pre-sale of the photographs will be offered at the reception; a silent online auction of photos will open on October 13.



Exhibit: Geta Brătescu
July 25 – September 28, 2014 every Sunday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday | 11 a.m.-5 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Geta BrătescuMATRIX 254 features the work of Romanian artist Geta Brătescu (b. 1926), who has been living and working in Bucharest since the 1950s. Working across a wide range of media (graphic design, drawing, video, textiles, performance, installation, photography, and printmaking), Brătescu is a central figure in postwar Romanian art. Due primarily to Communist leader Nicolae Ceauşescu’s totalitarian regime (1967–89), which suppressed the work of avant-garde artists living and working in Romania, and the subsequent political isolation of the country, Brătescu’s work was little known to international audiences until recently. For MATRIX 254, Brătescu’s first solo exhibition in a U.S. museum, the artist presents a focused selection of key works made between the years 1977 and 2000.

 Free BAM/PFA member; Cal Student, Staff, Faculty, and retirees; Children (12 and under),  $10 Adults (18-64),  $7 Non-UC Berkeley students, senior citizens (65 & over), disabled patrons, young adults (13-17)

Exhibit: Gourmet Ghettos, Modern Food Rituals
August 28 – December 19, 2014 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. | Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

For thousands of years, food rituals have been essential to constructing and maintaining Jewish identities throughout the diaspora. But the significance of these rituals might be more pervasive than we think. Gourmet Ghettos: Modern Food Rituals explores the broader linkages between food, ritual, identity, and activism that inform Jewish life.



Exhibit: The James Cahill Legacy
July 23 – December 21, 2014 every Sunday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday | 11 a.m.-5 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

One of James Cahill's paintingsThe late James Cahill, Professor Emeritus at UC Berkeley, was known as a brilliant scholar, exceptional teacher and writer, and extraordinary connoisseur and collector of Chinese and Japanese paintings. He began collecting in the mid-1950s as a Fulbright Scholar in Japan, where he encountered significantly undervalued Chinese paintings of the Ming and Qing periods. His collection became known by his studio name, Ching Yuan Chai, given to him by his own teacher, Shimada Shujiro. Today paintings associated with that studio name are among the treasures that make up the core of the BAM/PFA Chinese painting collection. In fond memory of James Cahill (1926–2014), we present this selection from the collection in tribute to his tremendous generosity and commitment to Berkeley and to BAM/PFA.

 Free BAM/PFA member; Cal Student, Staff, Faculty, and retirees; Children (12 and under),  $10 Adults (18-64),  $7 Non-UC Berkeley students, senior citizens (65 & over), disabled patrons, young adults (13-17)

Exhibit: Hard Words – Memory and death in the wild west
August 25, 2014 – February 20, 2015 every day | 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall Stephens Hall

Old West photoAn exhibition of Peter Koch's striking prints assembled from re-configured photographs, historical documents, manuscript journals and old newspaper engravings; accompanied by short legends written by the artist, hand-set in antique lead and wood type. The prints are accompanied by selected texts appropriated from the writings of Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Ross Cox, William T. Hornaday, L.A. Huffman, Elers Koch, and others.


FridayBack to top

Film: Borat
Friday, August 29 | 8:45 p.m. | PFA Theater

Promotional image from BoratIs there such a thing as cultural promiscuity? Having your way with the countries of the world? Sacha Baron Cohen’s hilarious misadventures take you through an amalgamated landscape of cultural miscues, misconceptions, and misanthropy to emerge, well, not exactly purified, but at least deloused. The titular Borat (Baron Cohen) is a Kazakhstanian journalist out to discover America. Smitten by Baywatch’s Pam Anderson (Anderson), he follows a libido-laden route to sunny SoCal.

 $5.50 BAM/PFA Member; Cal Student,  $6.50 Cal Faculty and Staff; Disabled Patron; Non Cal Student; Senior Patron ( 65 & Older); General Admission Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General admission

Film: Street of Shame
Friday, August 29 | 7 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from Street of ShameMizoguchi’s last completed film presents portraits of five prostitutes in a brothel called Dreamland in Yoshiwara, Tokyo’s red-light district. The women are in the life for a variety of reasons—a would-be bride finds being a whore preferable to being enslaved to a husband; a young mother assures her struggling husband, “Soon we’ll be glad we didn’t kill ourselves.” Another mother’s grown son witnesses her debasing herself to lure clients; still, she fantasizes this son wants to live with her, for Dreamland is as much about the women’s delusions as the johns’.

 $5.50 BAM/PFA Member; Cal Student,  $6.50 Cal Faculty and Staff; Disabled Patron; Non Cal Student; Senior Patron ( 65 & Older); General Admission Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General admission
SaturdayBack to top

Film: The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou
Saturday, August 30 | 8:50 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from The Life AquaticWould Jacques Cousteau be gulping for air? Steve Zissou (Bill Murray) is an oddball oceanographer assembling a crew for his next exploit, a film about the dread “jaguar shark,” the very one that chomped his pelagic partner. This aquatic predator may not be toothsome, or even real, but it’s Zissou’s own personal Moby nonetheless. Off goes Zissou’s ship-of-fools with long-lost son Ned (Owen Wilson) and crew, along with the ever-mellifluous Seu Jorge, who punctuates the proceedings by singing David Bowie songs in Portuguese. This zany cargo is all too precious, but it’s Wes Anderson, so drop anchor and wade in.

 $5.50 BAM/PFA Member; Cal Student,  $6.50 Cal Faculty and Staff; Disabled Patron; Non Cal Student; Senior Patron ( 65 & Older); General Admission Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General admission
SundayBack to top

Film: The Wicker Man
Sunday, August 31 | 7:30 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from The Wicker ManBefore Burning Man, there was The Wicker Man, that burning sensation. A Christian believer, Sergeant Howie (Edward Woodward), travels to the rustic island of Summerisle to investigate the disappearance of a young girl the islanders deny exists. The sarge is alarmed to find the inhabitants possessed of a paganism that has the cultists raising the maypole and fornicating in the fields. Playwright Anthony Shaffer (Sleuth, Frenzy) penned this heathen husk of folk horror specifically for Christopher Lee, who plays the priestly Lord Summerisle. This flammable flick finds its fright in the slow revelation that you are either kin or kindling. 

 $5.50 BAM/PFA Member; Cal Student,  $6.50 Cal Faculty and Staff; Disabled Patron; Non Cal Student; Senior Patron ( 65 & Older); General Admission Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General admission

Film: The Stranger
Sunday, August 31 | 5 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from The StrangerA comfortable Calcutta couple is visited by a seemingly long-lost uncle in Ray’s last film, a comedy of manners and a gentle parable of greed. Anila’s Uncle Manomohan was the family black sheep who went overseas in 1955 and was never heard from again; now he’s shown up on her family’s doorstep, and her husband Sudhindra is none too amused. Seeming genuine but with a strange, almost mystical air, the uncle ingratiates himself into the household, and soon challenges their notions of hospitality, culture, and civilization.

 $5.50 BAM/PFA Member; Cal Student,  $6.50 Cal Faculty and Staff; Disabled Patron; Non Cal Student; Senior Patron ( 65 & Older); General Admission Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General admission
TuesdayBack to top

Tour: Getting your bearings at the library
Tuesday, September 2 | 10-11 a.m. | Doe Library

Doe LibraryNew students are invited to take a tour of Doe Library, the Moffitt Undergraduate Library, and the Main Stacks. Get introduced to these central libraries and the student services they provide.



Lecture: Visualizing consciousness
Tuesday, September 2 | 5-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

Chimera (from The Empathics series), Saya Woolfalk, 2013This event brings New York artist Saya Woolfalk and Asian Art Museum curator Jeff Durham together to inaugurate BCSR’s new series, Berkeley Seminars in Art and Religion. Woolfalk and Durham will give visual presentations on their work and Woolfalk’s new performance responding to the Asian Art Museum’s exhibition, Enter the Mandala: Cosmic Centers and Mental Maps of Himalayan Buddhism.


WednesdayBack to top

Colloquium: Morality judgments
Wednesday, September 3 | 12-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

Joachim VosgerauPeople presume (im)morality to be a personality trait which is stable across time and domains. We assume that a person having lied to his spouse is more likely to do so again, or the same person is also more likely to embezzle public funds. Are these assumptions correct? Joachim Vosgerau, professor of marketing at the Tilburg School of Economics will test both assumptions in three experiments.



Film: Alternative Visions
Wednesday, September 3 | 7 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from Alternative images animationLaura Heit’s ingenious, do-it-yourself approach to animation takes a variety of forms and formats; her films employ puppets, hand drawing, and computer animation, as well as stop motion and toy theater. In one film, a woman imagines being invisible, others pay tribute to 9/11 and a pioneering woman paleontologist. Heit will perform one of her Matchbook Shows, where she manipulates miniature puppets to enact a tiny cabaret, which is then projected onscreen. She will also discuss her book, Animation Sketchbooks, a beautiful revelation of the creative processes of fellow animators.

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members, UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.


Lecture: The transformation of transportation
Wednesday, September 3 | 12-1 p.m. | 310, Banatao Auditorium Sutardja Dai Hall

Dan SperlingPassenger transportation was arguably the least innovative sector in our society over the past 80 years. Passenger travel has devolved into a monoculture where the single occupant vehicle dominates all other modes. We are now on the threshold of radical change. New mobility services such as Uber and Lyft, new propulsion technologies using electricity and hydrogen, and increasing vehicle automation could transform how we travel, with the potential for a much smaller resource and environmental footprint. Dan Sperling, professor of civil engineering and environmental science at UC Davis, will discuss the state of transportation.

 Free
registration required for lunch at UC Berkeley. Register online.

ThursdayBack to top

Film: Fear and Desire and Killer's Kiss
Thursday, September 4 | 7 p.m. | PFA Theater

Still image from Fear and DesireEnjoy a classic double feature of two of Kubrick’s feature films.

Fear and Desire tells the story of a squad of soldiers stranded behind enemy lines. They are members of an unspecified army, fighting an unspecified war. We are given their names and ranks, but little more. Kubrick’s first feature film, written by future Pulitzer Prize–winner Howard Sackler, is an existentialist exercise in the meaninglessness of war, played out in an eerie zone of suspended dread.

In Killer’s Kiss Kubrick determined what murky settings in his NYC neighborhood he could exploit for a low-budget film, then had scriptwriter Howard Sackler cast a net of words over them. The result is an ever-menacing mood piece about an exhausted taxi dancer (Irene Kane) and a has-been boxer (Jamie Smith) who must endure the jealous jockeying of a nightclub owner (Frank Silvera).

 $5.50 BAM/PFA members, UC Berkeley students,  $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty, staff, and retirees; Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Youth (17 & under),  $9.50 General Admission
Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.


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