<< February 2019 >>

Monday, February 4, 2019

Canceled - to Be Postponed: Lifeworlds of Indigenous Languages

Colloquium | February 4 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Beth Piatote, UC Berkeley

 Department of Linguistics

How do the underlying structures, epistemologies, and cultural practices associated with Indigenous languages in North America enrich the study of disciplines beyond linguistics? Drawing on my own work in Nez Perce language and literature, as well as examples from other scholars, I will present some of the current influences of Indigenous language “lifeworlds” shaping scholarship in law,...   More >

Friday, February 8, 2019

Berkeley Linguistics Society Workshop: Countability Distinctions

Conference/Symposium | February 8 | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 David Barner, UC San Diego; Suzi Lima, University of Toronto

 Department of Linguistics

See the Workshop Program.

Saturday, February 9, 2019

Berkeley Linguistics Society Workshop: Countability Distinctions

Conference/Symposium | February 9 | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 David Barner, UC San Diego; Suzi Lima, University of Toronto

 Department of Linguistics

See the Workshop Program.

Monday, February 11, 2019

The Fall and Rise of Vowel Length in Bantu

Colloquium | February 11 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Larry M. Hyman, Professor of Linguistics, UC Berkeley

 Department of Linguistics

Although Proto-Bantu had a vowel length contrast on roots which survives in many daughter languages today, many other Bantu languages have modified the inherited system. In this talk I distinguish between four types of Bantu languages: (1) Those which maintain the free occurrence of the vowel length contrast inherited from the proto language; (2) Those which maintain the contrast, but have added...   More >

Monday, February 25, 2019

Jessica Coon, "Mayan Agent Focus and the Ergative Extraction Constraint: Facts and Fictions Revisited"

Colloquium | February 25 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Jessica Coon, McGill University

 Department of Linguistics

Many languages of the Mayan family restrict the extraction of transitive (ergative) subjects for focus, wh-questions, and relativization (A’-extraction). We follow Aissen (2017) in labelling this restriction the ergative extraction constraint (EEC). In this talk, we offer a unified account of the EEC within Mayan languages, as well as an analysis of the special construction known as Agent Focus...   More >