<< April 2019 >>

Monday, April 1, 2019

Europe and Global Governance

Lecture | April 1 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 

Carlo Monticelli, Vice Governor of the Council of Europe Development Bank, Paris

 Barry Eichengreen, Department of Economics, UC Berkeley

 Institute of European Studies, Department of Economics

Why has Europe played such a weak role in the transformation of global economic governance that was triggered by the 2008 financial crisis? Are there viable strategies to enhance Europe’s impact on world economic and financial affairs? Would a stronger European influence be detrimental or beneficial to global stability? Carlo Monticelli’s talk addresses these questions building on insights from...   More >

Carlo Monticelli

Tuesday, April 2, 2019

Fascism’s Global Moments: New Perspectives on Entanglements and Tensions between Fascist Regimes in the 1930s and 1940s

Lecture | April 2 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Sven Reichard, University of Konstanz, Germany

 GHI West - Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC, Center for German and European Studies, Department of History

In his talk, Professor Reichardt will discuss how a global perspective can help us understand the nature of different fascist empires and the general character of fascism up to the end of World War II. He will focus on cooperation as well as competition between different fascist regimes, especially with regard to their imperial and colonial aspirations during the 1930s and 1940s. While a transfer...   More >

Wednesday, April 3, 2019

Secrets on the Way: The Poetry of Tomas Tranströmer. A Reading by Robert Hass and Screening of the Film "Secrets", Produced by Kathryn Roszak. Musical Prelude by Mads Tolling

Reading - Literary | April 3 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Robert Hass, Department of English, UC Berkeley; Kathryn Roszak, Artistic Director, Danse Lumière

 Institute of European Studies, Nordic Studies Program, Department of English

Robert Hass reads from his selection of poems by Swedish Nobel laureate Tomas Tranströmer that he translated, and Kathryn Roszak screens and discusses her
short film “Secrets”, a post-modern “tango,” inspired by Tranströmer's great poem "Schubertiana," a love story with two dancers seeking trust in New York City. The presentation will be followed by a Q and A with the audience.

Robert Hass is...   More >

Robert Hass

Thursday, April 4, 2019

Brexit, Britain, Scotland: The Future of the UK

Lecture | April 4 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 220 (Geballe Room)

 Allan Little, Former BBC Correspondent

 Institute of European Studies, St. Andrews' Society of San Francisco, Center for British Studies, Anglo-American Studies Program - Berkeley Law

Will Brexit lead to the break-up of Britain and to the independence of Scotland? Allan Little, a prominent BBC journalist, will give a presentation about Brexit and its impact on the United Kingdom. In his talk, Little will focus on the history of the UK nation-state in a broader European, perspective, and will reflect on its future after Brexit. He will pay special attention to the consequences...   More >

Allan Little

Friday, April 5, 2019

Gehen | Bleiben: Whether to remain or to leave

Film - Series | April 5 | 6-8:30 p.m. | Goethe-Institut San Francisco, Auditorium, Auditorium

 530 Bush Street, San Francisco, CA 94108

 Angst essen Seele auf (Fear Eats the Soul) by Rainer Werner Fassbinder Germany 1974

 Department of History, German Historical Institute Pacific Regional Office Berkeley, Institute of European Studies, Alliance Francaise San Francisco, Goethe-Institute San Francisco

A film series focusing on the everyday life of migrants and migrants in the making: Through the lens of intimate relationships and a ground-up historical perspective, five curated documentaries and films explore the causation and consequences of international and global migration.

Tuesday, April 9, 2019

Europe’s "Refugee Crisis" and the Colonial Archive or Is Art Universal?

Lecture | April 9 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Fatima El-Tayeb

 Institute of European Studies, The Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington

Using the case study of the "Multaqa" project, which brought refugees from Iraq and Syria to the museums of Berlin exhibiting ancient art from these countries, Fatima El-Tayeb’s talk explores the connections between Europe’s colonial legacy, rising global inequality and the "universal museum" as a model of Enlightenment (and as exemplified in the controversial Humboldt Forum).

Fatima El-Tayeb...   More >

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

German and U.S. Second World War Soldiers’ Cemeteries in Italy - Cultural Perspectives

Lecture | April 10 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Birgit Urmson, Art Historian

 Institute of European Studies

Styles of soldiers’ commemoration reveal national self-images. In this talk, Dr. Birgit Urmson analyzes US WWII military cemeteries in Italy and their German counterparts as art-historical artifacts. Their aesthetics, together with results of archival research, reveal a self-assured US united in values, projecting victory and Pax Americana,
while a struggling Germany searches for its democratic...   More >

Birgit Urmson

Thursday, April 11, 2019

Over Sixty in the Sixties: The Older Generation and Youth Protest in West Germany

Lecture | April 11 | 5-6 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Christina von Hodenberg, Director at German Historical Institute, London

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West - Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC, Center for German and European Studies

Recent works on the German and European sixties are all about youth. Educated middle-class students, artists and bohemians face off against equally educated professors, intellectuals and politicians. The ‘establishment’ of the aged and middle-aged population is a barely sketched-out backdrop to a story that unfolds from the perspective of young activists.

Christina von Hodenberg

Friday, April 12, 2019

From Enigma to Virtual Splendor - The Nazi-Era Theft and Restitution of Guillaume de Machaut’s Extraordinary Medieval Manuscript, the Ferrell-Vogüé

Lecture | April 12 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Carla Shapreau, Institute of European Studies

 Institute of European Studies, Department of Music

The stunning Guillaume de Machaut medieval codex known as the Ferrell-Vogüé has been cloistered in private ownership for nearly all of its long life. It is a manuscript of exceptional importance to the fields of music, literature, and art. It was also one of the most significant musical losses suffered on French soil during World War II. This lecture will focus on a time in the life of this...   More >

Gehen | Bleiben: Whether to remain or to leave

Film - Series | April 12 | 6-8:30 p.m. | Goethe-Institut San Francisco, Auditorium

 530 Bush Street, San Francisco, CA 94108

 Hippie Masala (Forever in India) by Ulrich Grossenbacher and Damaris Lüthi Switzerland 2006

 Department of History, German Historical Institute Pacific Regional Office Berkeley, Institute of European Studies, Goethe-Institut San Francisco, Alliance Francaise San Francisco

A film series focusing on the everyday life of migrants and migrants in the making: Through the lens of intimate relationships and a ground-up historical perspective, five curated documentaries and films explore the causation and consequences of international and global migration.

Monday, April 15, 2019

Who Dreams of Us? Reading, Inclusivity, and Contemporary Swedish-Language Literature

Lecture | April 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Saskia Vogel

 Institute of European Studies, Nordic Studies Program

In autumn 2017, a Neo-Nazi organization was given permit for a protest outside the annual Göteborg Book Fair. Leading up to this moment was the Book Fair’s controversial decision to yet again allow "Nya Tider" (New Times), a far-right extremist publication, to exhibit in the convention center. Debates raged for months and months in Sweden, as well as in Finland, the 2017 guest of honor at the...   More >

Saskia Vogel

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Deceptive Stability? Germany in Chancellor Angela Merkel’s Last Term

Lecture | April 16 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Niko Switek, University of Washington

 Institute of European Studies, Pacific Regional Office of the GHI Washington, Center for German and European Studies

Looking from the US to Germany many observers admire chancellor Angela Merkel as an element of stability in turbulent times. She is in her fourth term as chancellor and recently gave a passionate speech defending multilateralism and free trade at the Munich Security Conference - once main pillars of US foreign policy.
Yet politics in Germany turned turbulent themselves as result of the refugee...   More >

Niko Switek

Monday, April 22, 2019

Science, Poetry and Cultural Resistance in Early Modern Portugal

Lecture | April 22 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Luís Miguel Carolino

 Institute of European Studies, Portuguese Studies Program

In Renaissance Europe, cosmological poetry was often perceived as a privileged means to discuss the constitution of heaven, its structure and the interrelations of its parts. Nevertheless, the Portuguese case presents what seems to be a particularity in the European context. The Aristotelian philosophical tradition was put into question all over Renaissance Europe, but in Portugal the first sharp...   More >

Luís Miguel Carolino

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Beachhead or Refugium? The Rise and Dilemma of Germany’s Far-Right Intellectual Counterculture

Lecture | April 23 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Eliah Bures

 Institute of European Studies, The Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC

Today’s intellectual far right loves rebellion. In calculated acts of public provocation, radical conservative writers and thinkers present themselves as outsiders and nonconformists, bravely breaking the taboos of a "politically correct" mainstream culture. It is not for nothing that one of the premier publications of the German “New Right” is called Sezession and carries as its motto the Latin...   More >

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Political Imagery and Bonfires in Northern Ireland

Lecture | April 24 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Renée Tosser, Université de la Réunion (France)

 Irish Studies Program - Institute of European Studies

Visual displays play an important political role in Northern Ireland. They are often the most visible sign of sectarian division and attitudes in a society still marked by division thirty years after the end of the so-called ‘Troubles’. Violence still prevails in that country and sometimes it coalesces around Orange marches, especially during the month of July. July 12, known as "the Twelfth,"...   More >

Humanitarianism from the Margins: Framing Return Migration and Repatriation in Jewish Europe and Africa

Lecture | April 24 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Nick Underwood and Florian Wagner, Institute of European Studies, UC Berkeley & The Regional Pacific Office of the German Historical Institute, Washington DC

 Institute of European Studies, The Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington

A dual lecture with tandem fellows Nick Underwood and Florian Wagner. As fellows of the Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute with a focus on the history of migration, their research centers around Jewish return migration and repatriation tendencies in France and Ethiopia. The presentations will be followed by a discussion with Andrea Westermann,

Thursday, April 25, 2019

So what are we to make of Brexit?

Lecture | April 25 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Matt Beech

 Institute of European Studies, Center for British Studies, Berkeley Law, International Group

IES Senior Fellow Matt Beech, offers an analysis of Brexit in the post-March 29 environment. Beech evaluates the UK's current position and posits an interpretation of the decentering effects the phenomenon of Brexit has had, and will likely continue to have, upon the ideas, culture, and politics of Britain.

Matt Beech

Monday, April 29, 2019

Building Bridges or a Bridge Too Far? The "Macedonia" Name Agreement and the Past, Present and Future of Greek Interstate Relations

Lecture | April 29 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Spero Paravantes

 Institute of European Studies, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

The "Macedonia" name issue has been a constant point of contention between Greece and the newly re-named Republic of North Macedonia since the breakup of Yugoslavia. With the origins of the dispute stretching back to the Second World War, the "Prespa Agreement", signed between the two Balkan neighbors in June 2018 (in effect since February 2019) is hoped to be a new beginning in interstate...   More >

Spero Paravantes