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Upcoming Events

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Germany as an Immigration Country: Labor Migration and the Refugee Influx

Lecture | February 28 | 4-5 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Dr. Cornelia Schu, Managing Director and Director of the Research Unit, Expert Council of German Foundations on Intergration and Migration (SVR)

Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies, American Council on Germany, San Francisco Eric M. Warburg Chapter, German Historical Institute, West


Immigration and migration issues are currently at the top of the political agenda as all parties prepare their strategies for the upcoming federal elections in which Chancellor Merkel seeks her fourth term. More narrowly, the consequences of the refugee influx are passionately debated – a topic on which public opinion in Germany is sharply divided. More broadly, Germany aims to establish itself...   More >

Friday, March 3, 2017

Laid Low: Inside the Crisis That Overwhelmed Europe and the IMF

Presentation | March 3 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Paul Blustein, Senior Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation

Institute of European Studies


The latest book by journalist Paul Blustein to go behind the scenes at the highest levels of global economic policy making, Laid Low chronicles the crisis in the Euro Zone through the prism of the world’s financial firefighter, the International Monetary Fund. As the book reveals, bailouts of crisis-stricken countries all too often piled debt atop debt and imposed excessively harsh conditions as...   More >

Monday, March 6, 2017

Europe at a Crossroads

Lecture | March 6 | 1-2 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Ruth Jacoby, Former Ambassador of Sweden

Institute of European Studies


Europe has arrived at a challenging juncture in its history, economics and politics. There is Brexit, growing right-wing, populist and anti-European movements in Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic, but also in core EU-countries such as the Netherlands, Germany, and France, as well as in the Nordic countries. Growth is still sluggish after the financial crisis in 2008-9, unemployment is high, and...   More >



Materialised Knowledge in Renaissance Art and Science: The Production and Representation of Flemish Scientific Instruments

Lecture | March 6 | 5 p.m. | 308A Doe Library


Koenraad Van Cleempoel, Faculty of Architecture in Hasselt University (Belgium)

Institute of European Studies


Scientific instruments of the renaissance period well represent the concept of "materialised knowledge." They are carriers of ideas as well as very elegant and refined objects. The lecture will discuss astrolabes, globes, sundials and armillary spheres with a particular emphasis on the Flemish context: between c. 1525 and c. 1580 the university city of Louvain became Europe's most important...   More >

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

The European Union’s response to radical right-wing populism

Lecture | March 8 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Ludvig Norman, Uppsala University

Institute of European Studies


The rise of radical right-wing populism is often regarded as one of the most serious challenges to European democracy and European political cooperation. In recent years, extreme nationalist parties have accumulated considerable support in European elections. In some EU member states, most notably Poland and Hungary, governments are increasingly challenging liberal democracy, taking steps towards...   More >



The European Union’s Response to Radical Right-Wing Populism

Lecture | March 8 | 1-2 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Ludvig Norman, Department of Government, Uppsala University, IES Visiting Scholar

Institute of European Studies


The rise of radical right-wing populism is often regarded as one of the most serious challenges to European democracy and European political cooperation. In recent years, extreme nationalist parties have accumulated considerable support in European elections. In some EU member states, most notably Poland and Hungary, governments are increasingly challenging liberal democracy, taking steps towards...   More >

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Ana Hatherly and The Portuguese Concrete Poetry

Colloquium | March 9 | 10 a.m.-12 p.m. | 303 Doe Library


Carlos Reis, Professor, University of Coimbra, Portugal; Professor Arthur Askins, Professor Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley

Institute of European Studies



Ana Hatherly and The Portuguese Concrete Poetry

Colloquium | March 9 | 10 a.m.-12 p.m. | 303 Doe Library


Carlos Reis, Professor, University of Coimbra, Portugal; Professor Arthur Askins, Professor Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley

Institute of European Studies

Monday, March 13, 2017

Will Geert Wilders Become the New Dutch Prime Minister? The Upcoming General Elections in the Netherlands

Lecture | March 13 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Jeroen Dewulf, Institute of European Studies

Institute of European Studies


On March 15, 2017, the citizens of the Netherlands will elect a new parliament and a new government. In this lecture, we will analyze the different parties and party leaders participating in these elections and discuss the latest projections of the election results. Of particular interest to the rest of Europe are the chances of Geert Wilders, leader of the populist Freedom Party, becoming the...   More >

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Transitional Justice in Europe since after regime changes in 1945,1975, and 1990

Lecture | March 16 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Anja Mihr, Program Director, HUMBOLDT-VIADRINA Center on Governance through Human Rights

Institute of European Studies


Post-war Germany, post-dictatorial Spain and post-communist and dictatorial Poland and Turkey illustrate how Europe aimed to democratize in over the past decades with or without Transitional Justice measures. This talk is based on a 10 years research endeavor in different European countries and through different time zones and periods in Europe since 1945. It shows the medium- and long-term...   More >

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Separate but Equal? Individual and Community since the Enlightenment

Lecture | March 22 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Richard Herr, Professor Emeritus of History, UC Berkeley

Institute of European Studies


The United States and European nations face the challenge of providing a happy relationship between their leading social sectors and the other communities within them. Behind the racial, ethnic, and gender discrimination that culminated in the horrors of the totalitarian regimes lay the nineteenth-century drive to create homogeneous national societies by assimilating social minorities into the...   More >

Thursday, March 23, 2017

The First Rambo? Finns in North America since 1638

Lecture | March 23 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Ismo Söderling, Director of the Population Research Institute, Helsinki, & Director of the Institute of Migration, Turku

Institute of European Studies


The boom of the Finnish emigration to the USA took place in the late 19th century. The total number of Finnish migrants - around 300 000, consisted of close to 10 % of the Finnish population. Finns moved mainly to Michigan and Minnesota where free farmland was still available.

The Finnish migrants also founded several utopia settlements in different parts of North America. The most famous of...   More >