Upcoming Events

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Rope-A-Dope Politics and the Erosion of Democratic Norms

Lecture | February 27 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Markus Hinterleitner, Institute of European Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute of European Studies

Many advanced democracies are currently characterized by a norm-eroding politics, which manifests itself in increased levels of populism and blame generation. The erosion of norms is a potentially far-reaching challenge for democracy. In his lecture, Markus Hinterleitner conceptualizes the process of political norm erosion capturing the interactions of norm violators and norm defenders with the...   More >

Markus Hinterleitner

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Project Europe: A New History of the European Union

Lecture | February 28 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 240 Mulford Hall

 Kiran Klaus Patel, Maastricht University

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West, Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Insitute Washington DC, Department of History, Center for German and European Studies

Today, the EU seems to be in an existential crisis. Against this backdrop, the early history of European integration since the 1950s shines all the brighter. But is this an appropriate assessment? Kiran Patel analyzes the concrete effects and results of European integration and what we can learn from the past for our present day, summarizing some of the key findings of his monograph on the topic...   More >

Monday, March 4, 2019

The Securitization of Migration and Racial Sorting in Fortress Europe

Lecture | March 4 | 12 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Maartje van der Woude, Leiden Law School (Netherlands)

 Institute of European Studies, Berkeley Interdisciplinary Migration Initiative, GHI West - Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC

These past two decades the European Union has been hit by two so-called "crises": the financial or "Euro" crisis of 2008 and the 2015-2016 migration crisis. Whereas both crises have fed into euro-sceptic sentiments, it is safe to say that the response to the financial crisis at least seemed to be somewhat coordinated and uniform with EU member states coming together to reinforce the monetary...   More >

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

The Future of European Research via the lenses of the Horizon EU research and innovation programme 2021-2027

Lecture | March 6 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Jekaterina Novikova, EU Fellow at the IES

 Institute of European Studies, European Union Center

Jekaterina Novikova, EU fellow at the Institute of European Studies at UC Berkeley and Innovation Policy Coordinator at the European Commission, will speak about Horizon EU, a European research and innovation programme. This talk will highlight the process of the preparation of the programme based on the lessons learned from the previous programs, its building blocks, key novelties, and...   More >

Jekaterina Novikova

Thursday, March 7, 2019

European Economic Integration and Populism: Foes or Allies?

Lecture | March 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Dariusz Adamski, University of Wrocław

 Institute of European Studies, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Could it be that one of the most extraordinary experiments in international reconciliation and community-building in the history of mankind – European integration after World War II – has contributed to what European Commission President Juncker once dubbed “galloping populism”? Seeking an answer to this question, Dariusz Adamski will dissect the nature of the major economic policies of the...   More >

Dariusz Adamski

Language Change and Narrative Form from Ó Cadhain to Ferrante

Lecture | March 7 | 5 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315 - Maude Fife Room

 Barry McCrea, University of Notre Dame

 Institute of European Studies, Irish Studies Program

This talk looks at the difficulties faced by minor languages in founding traditions of the realist novel, and explores what these difficulties can tell us about the nature of the genre itself.

Speaker: Barry McCrea is a novelist and scholar of modern European, Latin American, and Irish literature. He most recent book is Languages of the Night: Minor Languages and the Literary Imagination in...   More >

Barry McCrea (University of Notre Dame)

Monday, March 11, 2019

Redemption Blues: Film Screening and Director Q&A

Film - Documentary | March 11 | 1:30-3:30 p.m. |  Fromm Institute Auditorium - University of San Francisco

 660 Parker Street, San Francisco, CA 94117

 Peter Stastny

 Institute of European Studies, Austrian Studies Program, Fromm Institute - University of San Francisco

"Redemption Blues" is a documentary about the legacy of the Holocaust and the insights of some of its last survivors. The film begins where conventional Shoah narratives leave off and traces a path forward, through personal and emotional engagement towards hope. The film will be introduced by filmmaker Peter Stastny, who will participate in a discussion and Q&A following the screening.

Tuesday, March 12, 2019

New Approaches to the Prague Spring

Lecture | March 12 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Timothy Scott Brown, Northeastern University, Boston

 Institute of European Studies

The Prague Spring, a movement of reform Communism instituted in Czechoslovakia under Alexander Dubcek in early 1968 and crushed by Soviet force of arms in August of the same year, has been interpreted overwhelmingly according to a liberal narrative ending in the “Velvet Revolution” of 1989. To be sure, the relevance of the experiment in “Socialism with a Human Face” for the Europe-wide uprisings...   More >

Timothy Scott Brown

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

A Field of Autocratic Temptation: European Football and its Actors

Lecture | March 13 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Timm Beichelt, European University Viadrina, Frankfurt (Oder)

 Institute of European Studies

While football officials often insist that sports and politics belong to different spheres, the opposite seems to be true. With frames like “success”, “unlimited competition”, and “team loyalty”, football heavily influences the pre-political sphere in European states. In the field of football, basic dispositions with regard to the legitimacy of an economized life and the definition of local or...   More >

Timm Beichelt

Monday, March 18, 2019

Defining Roles. Representations of Lumumba and his Independence Speech in Congolese and Belgian Literature

Lecture | March 18 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Lieselot De Taeye, Institute of European Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute of European Studies, Center for African Studies

On June 30th 1960, Congo declared its independence from Belgium. In his speech at the ceremony, the Belgian King Baudouin applauded the work of his countrymen during the colonial period, calling his great-granduncle Leopold II, who was responsible for the death of approximately ten million Congolese people, a ‘genius’. Patrice Lumumba, the first Congolese Prime Minister, gave a now-famous speech...   More >

Lieselot De Taeye

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Helke Sander's dffb Cinema, 1968 and West Germany's Feminist Movement

Lecture | March 19 | 2-3 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Christina Gerhardt, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

 Institute of European Studies

Helke Sander was a key figure of the early dffb (Deutsche Film- und Fernsehakademie Berlin), where she studied between 1966 and 1969. Returning to her political organizing and her films of the era revises three crucial narratives:
1. it expands narratives about 1968 to include the establishment of feminism as part of it (The Tomatenwurf), which is often read as a 1970s phenomenon;
2. it...   More >

Christina Gerhard

Monday, April 1, 2019

Europe and Global Governance

Lecture | April 1 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 

Carlo Monticelli, Vice Governor of the Council of Europe Development Bank, Paris

 Barry Eichengreen, Department of Economics, UC Berkeley

 Institute of European Studies, Department of Economics

Why has Europe played such a weak role in the transformation of global economic governance that was triggered by the 2008 financial crisis? Are there viable strategies to enhance Europe’s impact on world economic and financial affairs? Would a stronger European influence be detrimental or beneficial to global stability? Carlo Monticelli’s talk addresses these questions building on insights from...   More >

Carlo Monticelli

Tuesday, April 2, 2019

Fascism’s Global Moments: New Perspectives on Entanglements and Tensions between Fascist Regimes in the 1930s and 1940s

Lecture | April 2 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Sven Reichard, University of Konstanz, Germany

 GHI West - Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC, Center for German and European Studies, Department of History

In his talk, Professor Reichardt will discuss how a global perspective can help us understand the nature of different fascist empires and the general character of fascism up to the end of World War II. He will focus on cooperation as well as competition between different fascist regimes, especially with regard to their imperial and colonial aspirations during the 1930s and 1940s. While a transfer...   More >

Thursday, April 11, 2019

Don’t Trust Anyone Under 30? Older People and Changing Values in the Long Sixties

Lecture | April 11 | 5-6 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Christina von Hodenberg, Director at German Historical Institute, London

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West - Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC, Center for German and European Studies

Recent works on the German and European 1960s and 1970s are all about youth. Educated middle-class students, artists, and bohemians face off against equally educated professors, intellectuals and politicians. The ‘establishment’ of the aged and middle-aged population is a barely sketched-out backdrop to a story that unfolds from the perspective of young activists. Based on interviews from the...   More >

Christina von Hodenberg