<< Monday, November 05, 2018 >>

Monday, November 5, 2018

Investigating "Security Roads": Southeast Asia and South Korea's Nascent Construction Industry

Colloquium: Center for Korean Studies: Center for Southeast Asia Studies | November 5 | 12-2 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 John P. DiMoia, Seoul National University

 Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

This talk considers South Korea’s relationship to Southeast Asia through the pair of Thailand and South Vietnam, looking at the “new” relationships formed in the aftermath of the Korean War. With diplomatic ties restored in the mid to late 1950s, the ROK began to make inquiries while pursuing infrastructure projects, often connecting with the same pool of international...   More >

Petroleum Powered: Resources and the Transnational Foundations of China’s Far West

Colloquium | November 5 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Judd Kinzley, Associate Professor of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 You-tien Hsing, Professor and Pamela P. Fong Family Distinguished Chair in China Studies, University of California, Berkeley

 Li Ka-Shing Foundation Program in Modern Chinese History at Berkeley, Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

This talk will focus on the central role that natural resources played in shaping Chinese state power and authority in China's far western province of Xinjiang. Based on my recently published book, Natural Resources and the New Frontier: Constructing Modern China’s Borderlands, my talk will highlight the often overlooked role played by an assortment of Chinese and Soviet state agents, as well as...   More >

The Western and Questions of Indigeneity, Race and Violence in the American and Japanese Frontiers or, Two Unforgivens

Colloquium: Center for Japanese Studies | November 5 | 4-6 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Andrew Barshay, Professor, UC Berkeley

 Takashi Fujitani, Professor, University of Toronto

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS)

This presentation juxtaposes Clint Eastwood’s critically acclaimed Unforgiven (1992) against Lee Sang-il’s “remake” (Yurusarezaru mono, 2013) of the original as a method for recasting the histories of modern Japan and the U.S. as comparable and coeval settler colonial empires. The speaker will work through the insights and absences in these films to piece together a historical...   More >