All events

Keegan Houser
Upcoming Events

Thursday, August 22, 2019

The Archaeology of Beer

Lecture | August 22 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Christine Hastorf, Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Join us for a lecture from Christine Hastorf, Ph.D. on the history of beer through an archaeological lens. How long have people been making beer? Where did beer making traditions first begin? How do ancient beer making traditions compare to those in practice around the world today? This lecture is hosted alongside the Hearst Museum's current exhibit - Pleasure, Poison, Prescription, Prayer: The...   More >

 $6-14

  Buy tickets online

Tuesday, August 27, 2019

Back to My Roots: Omar Bashir

Performing Arts - Music | August 27 | 7-8:30 p.m. |  Hertz Concert Hall

 Omar Bashir

 Assyrian Arts Institute, University of California, Berkeley

Assyrian Arts Institute Artists Tours presents: Omar Bashir, featuring Ilona Danho, Assyrian vocalist. Omar Bashir is an Assyrian/Hungarian internationally renowned player of the oud. He has recorded 20 CDs.

 $35 General Admission, $10 Student

  Buy tickets online or or by emailing tickets@berkeley.edu

Tuesday, September 3, 2019

Boris, Brexit and Europe: An Interpretation

Lecture | September 3 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Matt Beech, Founding Director of the Centre for British Politics at the University of Hull & Senior Fellow at the Institute of European Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute of European Studies, Berkeley Law, International Group

Boris Johnson’s election as Leader of the Conservative and Unionist Party, and therefore, as Prime Minister was a foregone conclusion to close observers of British politics. Where there is a disruption in the business of Westminster is the fact that the United Kingdom has its first Eurosceptic Prime Minister since Mrs Thatcher delivered her Bruges Speech. The long and winding road to Brexit has...   More >

Matt Beech

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

Zero Sum Politics? Austrian Government and Challenges to the Kelsenian Vision of Democracy

Lecture | September 4 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 David M. Wineroither, Center for Social Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

 Institute of European Studies

Hans Kelsen expressed his absolute acceptance of democratic rule at a time when most political parties, citizens and colleagues of his either openly rejected parliamentary democracy or embraced democracy as a means to prepare for imperfectly democratic means – in his own country, Austria, as well as in the majority of surrounding countries in Central Europe.
Kelsen demanded political actors to...   More >

David M. Wineroither / Photo Credit: Konrad Adenauer Foundation

Thursday, September 5, 2019

Artist Talk - Rina Banerjee

Lecture | September 5 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Rina Banerjee, Artist; Sugata Ray, Associate Professor of South and Southeast Asian Art, History of Art Department; Atreyee Gupta, Assistant Professor of Global Modern Art and South and Southeast Asian Art, History of Art Department

 Dipti Mathur, Chair, Advisory Board, South Asia Art Initiative; Collector, Contemporary South Asian art

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, South Asia Art Initiative, Department of History of Art, Department of Art Practice

A talk by Artist Rina Banerjee followed by a conversation between her, Prof. Sugata Ray and Prof. Atreyee Gupta. The conversation will be moderated by Chair, Advisory Board, South Asia Art Initiative and Collector of contemporary South Asian art collector of contemporary South Asian art, Dipti Mathur.

Friday, September 6, 2019

Writing for Print: Publishing and the Making of Textual Authority in Late Imperial China

Colloquium | September 6 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Suyoung Son, Assistant Professor of Asian Studies, Cornell University

 Wen-hsin Yeh, Professor of History, University of California, Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

This talk examines the widespread practice of self-publishing by writers in late imperial China, focusing on two seventeenth-century literati-cum-publishers, Zhang Chao in Yangzhou and Wang Zhuo in Hangzhou. By giving due weight to the writers as active agents in increasing the influence of print, it explores the intricate relationships between manuscript tradition and print convention, peer...   More >

Monday, September 9, 2019

Graduate Student Conference: Understanding the Countryside. Rural Europe in a Post-Global World

Conference/Symposium | September 9 | International House, Sproul Rooms

 Institute of European Studies, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

The Brexit referendum of June 2016, the United States presidential election of November of that same year and the recent gilets jaunes (“yellow vests”) movement in France have brought unprecedented international attention to rural areas in the Western world. While some scholars have argued that the urban-rural dichotomy is a mistaken and misleading construct, others are questioning the reasons...   More >

Tuesday, September 10, 2019

Omar Khan | Paper Jewels: Postcards from the Raj

Lecture | September 10 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room) | Note change in date

 Omar Khan, Author, Distinguished scholar, & San Francisco based historian

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, South Asia Art Initiative, Department of History of Art, Department of Comparative Literature, Department of Art Practice

A presentation by distinguished scholar and San Francisco based historian, Omar Khan, on his new publication Paper Jewels: Postcards from the Raj, a visual tour of India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka through 500 vintage postcards (1892 to 1947).

Wednesday, September 11, 2019

Talk by Dr. Asad Majeed Khan, Ambassador of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan to the United States: Title TBD

Lecture | September 11 | 4-6 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Ambassador Asad Majeed Khan, Ambassador of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan to the United States

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Berkeley Pakistan Initiative

Ambassador Asad Majeed Khan became ambassador of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan to the United States on January 11, 2019. Please join us in welcoming him to UC Berkeley.

Thursday, September 12, 2019

US, UK, EU: Brexit, Trump, Foreign Policy and Transatlantic Relations

Lecture | September 12 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 David Whineray, Visiting Scholar, Center for British Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute of European Studies, Center for British Studies, Anglo-American Studies Program

Major geopolitical changes are taking place within Europe, and between the United States and Europe. Brexit is the biggest geopolitical shift in Europe since the fall of the Berlin Wall. After 50 years of European integration—championed by successive US administrations—the UK’s exit from the EU is the first time a country has left the union. At the same time, European-US relations have become...   More >

Will North Korea denuclearize?: Big Deal, Small Deal, or More of the Same?

Colloquium | September 12 | 4:30-6 p.m. | Doe Library, Room 180

 Sung Joo Han, Professor Emeritus, Korea University

 Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

Summary:

After the failure of Hanoi U.S.-North Korea summit held in February this year, the impasse between the two countries seemed irreversible. Washington wanted a “big deal” on North Korean nuclear weapons; Pyongyang insisted on a “small deal” first.

President Trump said after the break-up that North Korea wanted too much (“complete lifting” of sanctions) and offered too little (only...   More >

Filled with Meaning: Why Do the Contents of Buddhist Statues Matter?

Colloquium | September 12 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 James Robson, Harvard University

 Center for Buddhist Studies

Scholars have recently come to realize that religious statues throughout Asia have hidden cavities that are filled with various objects inserted during a consecration ritual. This talk explores the hidden world of these statues through a discussion of a large collection of (primarily) Buddhist statues from China, Korea, and Japan. The statues discussed in this talk contain a niche carved into...   More >

Thursday, September 19, 2019

Natural Resources, Environmental Challenges and Youth Leaders from Southeast Asia: A Forum on Innovations and Solutions

Panel Discussion | September 19 | 12-2 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

This forum will present current perspectives on environmental issues in Southeast Asia as experienced and envisioned today by young activists and students from the region. The participants are visiting UC Berkeley as part of a program managed by the East-West Center in Honolulu and sponsored by the U.S. State Department.

Friday, September 20, 2019

Help (Not) Wanted: Immigration Politics in Japan

Colloquium | September 20 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Michael Strausz, Texas Christian University

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS)

Why has Japan’s immigration policy remained so restrictive, especially in light of economic, demographic, and international political forces that are pushing Japan to admit more immigrants? In this presentation, Strausz will argue that Japan’s immigration policy has remained restrictive for two reasons. First, Japan’s labor-intensive businesses have failed to defeat anti-immigration forces within...   More >

Monday, September 23, 2019

Mongolia's Monastery Massacres: "The Green-Eyed Lama

Lecture | September 23 | 5 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Oyungerel Tsedevdamba, Author; Oyungerel Tsedevdamba, Author; Jeff Falt, Author; Jeff Falt, Author

 Brian Baumann, UC Berkeley; Brian Baumann, UC Berkeley

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative

The Green-Eyed Lama (2008) is an award-winning, decade-long bestselling novel written by Oyungerel Ts and Jeff Falt. First published in Mongolian, the book chronicles the triumphant romance between Sendmaa, a young belle in the countryside, and Baasan, a monk in the lamasery, as they try to cope with the turmoils of the political purge, terrible massacres and mass executions of thousands of...   More >

Thursday, September 26, 2019

New Directions in Himalayan Studies - On Migration: A Joint UC Berkeley-CNRS Workshop

Conference/Symposium | September 26 | 2-5 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Tristan Bruslé, Researcher, Centre d'Études Himalayennes, CNRS - Villejuif; Keiko Yamanaka, Lecturer, Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies, UC Berkeley

 Alexander von Rospatt, Professor, Buddhist and South Asian Studies; Acting Chair, South and Southeast Asian Studies; and Director, Himalayan Studies Initiative

 Stéphane Gros, Researcher, Centre d'Études Himalayennes, CNRS - Villejuif

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Himalayan Studies Program, France Berkeley Fund, Centre d'Etudes Himalayennes (CEH) of the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), France

A three-day workshop at UC Berkeley that will bring together experts working on the Himalayan region in the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Friday, September 27, 2019

Roving Revolutionaries: Armenians and Connected Revolutions in the Russian, Iranian, and Ottoman Worlds

Lecture | September 27 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Houri Berberian, Professor of History; Meghrouni Family Presidential Chair in Armenian Studies; Director of the Armenian Studies Program, UC Irvine

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program

Three of the formative revolutions that shook the early twentieth-century world occurred almost simultaneously in regions bordering each other. Though the Russian, Iranian, and Young Turk Revolutions all exploded between 1904 and 1911, they have never been studied through their linkages until now. Roving Revolutionaries probes the interconnected aspects of these three revolutions through the...   More >

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Voices of Vietnam: The Sonic Formation of the State

Lecture | October 1 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Lonan O'Briain, Associate Professor of Music, University of Nottingham

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

Prof. O’Briain is an ethnomusicologist who specializes in the music and soundscapes of Vietnam and of upland areas in mainland Southeast Asia. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Sheffield. He is the author of Musical Minorities: The Sounds of Hmong Ethnicity in Northern Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018).

Lonan O'Briain

Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Janaki Bakhle | Gandhi, Savarkar and the Muslim Question: Celebrating the 150th Birth Anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi

Lecture | October 2 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Janaki Bakhle, Associate Professor of History, UC Berkeley

 Munis Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Professor of India Studies; Associate Professor in the Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by Professor Janaki Bakhle, Associate Professor of History at UC Berkeley.

Ancient Amazons: Warrior Women in Myth, Art, and Archaeology

Lecture | October 2 | 5-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Adrienne Mayor, Stanford University

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

Fierce Amazons are featured in some of the most famous Greek myths.
Every great hero, from Heracles to Achilles, battled these powerful warrior queens.
But were Amazons real? Join Adrienne Mayor as she recounts tales of women warriors and uncovers some realities behind the myths.

Monday, October 7, 2019

Raghu Karnad | Farthest Field: An Indian Story of the Second World War

Reading - Literary | October 7 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Raghu Karnad, Journalist and Writer

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Art Forum

A talk by Indian journalist and writer, and a recipient of the Windham–Campbell Literature Prize for Non-Fiction for 2019, Raghu Karnad.

Transcending Patterns: Silk Road Cultural and Artistic Interactions through Central Asian Textile Images

Lecture | October 7 | 5 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Mariachiara Gasparini, San Jose State University

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

In her book "Transcending Patterns: Silk Road Cultural and Artistic Interactions through Central Asian Textiles," author Mariachiara Gasparini investigates the origin and effects of a textile mediated visual culture that developed at the heart of the Silk Road between the seventh and fourteenth centuries. Through the analysis of the Turfan Textile Collection in the Museum of Asian Art in...   More >

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

China’s Rise in Historical Perspective

Colloquium | October 8 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Klaus Mühlhahn, Professor of Chinese History and Culture, Free University of Berlin

 Wen-hsin Yeh, Professor, Department of History, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Many commentators claim that China's ongoing global rise reflects a restoration of its earlier international prominence, while others highlight that China's emergence reflects distinctive characteristics of the country's current political leadership. In his new book, Making China Modern, Klaus Mühlhahn of the Free University of Berlin provides a panoramic survey of China's rise and resilience...   More >

An Evening with Deepti Naval: An Actor's Perspective

Performing Arts - Theater | October 8 | 5-7 p.m. | 10 Stephens Hall

 Deepti Naval, Actress, Director, & Writer

 Harsha Ram, Associate Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures and Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Art Forum

A conversation with acclaimed actress, director, & writer, Deepti Naval.

Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Raj Rewal | Alternate Modernity: Space, Structures, Sustainability and Traditional Values

Lecture | October 9 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Raj Rewal, Architect

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, South Asia Art Initiative

A talk by one of India's best-known architects, Raj Rewal

Thursday, October 17, 2019

“Some Live in Darkness, Some Live in Light”: China and Elsewhere in 1900

Colloquium | October 17 | 4-6 p.m. | Faculty Club, Heyns Room

 Peter Perdue, Professor of History, Yale University

 Wen-hsin Yeh, Professor, Department of History, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

At the turn of the twentieth century, in a brilliant spectacle, the Western powers and Japan demonstrated their imperial prowess at the Paris Exposition of 1900. Several months later, the same powers invaded China to lift the siege of the foreign legations by the Boxers and the Qing government. The Qing government fell to its nadir, but China’s inextricable links to global trends soon brought...   More >

Friday, October 18, 2019

Getting to Know the Gods of Taiwan: Children’s Literature and Identity Formation

Colloquium | October 18 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Natasha Heller, Associate Professor of Chinese Religions, University of Virginia

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

In secular children’s books, gods are often part of history and culture—but what roles are they expected to play in the lives of contemporary children? Focusing on picture books and early readers about the goddess Mazu 媽祖 and the earth god (tudi gong 土地公), I will argue that they represent different strategies of incorporating religion in the creation of...   More >

Thursday, October 24, 2019

Great Power Competition in the 21st Century: Linking Economics and Security

Conference/Symposium | October 24 | 9:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Berkeley APEC Study Center (BASC), UC Labs Fund

Great power competition is once again a critical component of the international system, with far reaching implications for the stability of the existing political and economic order. However, power is not always won by confrontation, but through tactical, indirect rivalry across issue areas. Strategic competition between the United States, China, India, and other rising powers spans industries...   More >

Friday, October 25, 2019

Atif Mian | What to do about Pakistan’s Economy?: The Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture for 2019

Lecture | October 25 | 6-8 p.m. |  TBD

 Atif R. Mian, Professor, Economics, Public Policy and Finance (Princeton University) and Co-Founder & Board Member, Center for Economic Research in Pakistan (CERP)

 Munis Faruqui, Chair, Institute for South Asia Studies, Associate Professor of South and Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative, The Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture

Princeton economist, Prof. Atif Mian delivers our seventh Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture.

Monday, October 28, 2019

A People's Weapon: Law and Propaganda in the Early People's Republic of China

Colloquium | October 28 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Jennifer Altehenger, Associate Professor in Chinese History, University of Oxford

 Rachel Stern, Professor, School of Law, University of California, Berkeley

 Li Ka Shing Foundation Program in Modern Chinese History

Throughout the history of modern China, people have been taught about their country's laws. Even as polities and regimes changed, they shared in common the conviction that to learn, know, and abide by laws should be an elementary civic duty. After the establishment of the People's Republic of China, the new government invested even more energy than its predecessors into devising methods to...   More >

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Redefining Political Space in Post-Crisis Europe: Is There Hope for EU Democracy?

Lecture | October 29 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Ludvig Norman, Stockholm University

 Institute of European Studies

In recent years, the European Union has found itself in a state of seemingly chronic crisis, including the economic and financial crisis unleashed on Europe in 2008, the political crisis with the rise of populist and extremist parties across the continent, the migration crisis as well as Brexit. It is widely held that the response to these crises has led to a considerable strengthening of...   More >

Ludvig Norman

Global Borderlands: Fantasy, Violence, and Empire in Subic Bay, Philippines

Lecture | October 29 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Victoria Reyes, Assistant Professor of Sociology, UC Riverside

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

This talk, derived from Prof. Reyes' new book, draws on archival and ethnographic data to describe the everyday experiences of people living and working in Subic Bay in the Philippines (a former U.S. military base, now a Freeport Zone), to make the case for critically examining similar spaces across the world.

Sugata Ray | Climate Change and the Art of Devotion: Geoaesthetics in the Land of Krishna, 1550–1850

Reading - Nonfiction | October 29 | 5-7 p.m. | 10 Stephens Hall

 Sugata Ray, Associate Professor of South and Southeast Asian Art, History of Art Department, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Department of History of Art, The South Asia Art Initiative at UC Berkeley

A conversation around Professor Sugata Ray's recent publication, Climate Change and the Art of Devotion: Geoaesthetics in the Land of Krishna, 1550–1850.

Friday, November 1, 2019

The Spatiality of Emotion in Early Modern China: From Dreamscapes to Theatricality

Colloquium | November 1 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Ling Hon Lam, Associate Professor, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley

 David Marno, Associate Professor of English, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Emotion takes place. Rather than an interior state of mind in response to the outside world, emotion per se is spatial, at turns embedding us from without, transporting us somewhere else, or putting us ahead of ourselves. In his book The Spatiality of Emotion in Early Modern China, Ling Hon Lam gives an original account of the history of emotions in Chinese literature and culture centered on the...   More >

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

New Directions in Bangladesh Studies: Recent Scholarship and New Publications

Panel Discussion | November 5 | 3-7 p.m. | 10 Stephens Hall

 Poulomi Saha, Assistant Professor of English, UC Berkeley; Nusrat S. Chowdhury, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Amherst College; Tariq Omar Ali, Assistant Professor of History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Subir & Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies, Department of English

A panel discussion on recent scholarship on Bangladesh-related studies with Nusrat S. Chowdhury, Tariq Omar Ali, and Poulomi Saha.

Thursday, November 7, 2019

Francis Cody | Defamation Machine: Law, Free Speech, and the Political Body

Lecture | November 7 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Francis Cody, Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and the Asian Institute at the University of Toronto

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, The Townsend Center Working Group on Labor, Philosophy, and Change, Townsend Center for the Humanities Lecture Grant, Department of Anthropology

A talk by Professor Francis Cody, scholar of the language and politics of southern India and Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and the Asian Institute at the University of Toronto.

Friday, November 8, 2019

Abandoning the City: Studying Chinese Landscape in the Age of Climate Change

Colloquium | November 8 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 De-nin D. Lee, Associate Professor, Visual & Media Arts, Emerson College

 Gregory Levine, Professor, Art and Architecture of Japan and Buddhist Visual Cultures, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

In a 1999 lecture (published in 2005 in Archives of Asian Art), Prof. James Cahill offered thoughts on the history and post-history of Chinese painting. Not solely about landscape, nevertheless, his remarks were inextricable from his lifetime’s study of that genre. The field of Chinese landscape, he observed, produced on the basis of internal, stylistic developments a coherent canon. This canon...   More >

Shitao (Zhu Ruoji, 1642-1707), “Man in the Mountain,”from Album for Daoist Yu, late 1690s. Leaf L in an album of twelve leaves, ink and color on paper, 9 ½ x 11 in. The C. C. Wang Family Collection, New York

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Aishwary Kumar | Can the People Rule? Gandhi, Dignity, and Resentment: Celebrating the 150th Birth Anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi

Lecture | November 12 | 5-7 p.m. | 10 Stephens Hall

 Aishwary Kumar, political theorist and intellectual historian of South Asia, empire, and the Global South

 Munis Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Professor of India Studies; Associate Professor in the Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by political theorist and intellectual historian of South Asia, empire, and the Global South, Professor Aishwary Kumar.

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Rahuldeep Singh Gill | Ante-Colonial Anti-Imperial Sikh Tradition: Reflections on the 550th Anniversary of Guru Nanak's Birth

Lecture | November 14 | 5-7 p.m. | 10 Stephens Hall

 Rahuldeep Singh Gill, Associate Professor of Religion, California Lutheran University

 Munis Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Professor of India Studies; Associate Professor in the Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by Associate Professor of Religion and the campus interfaith strategist at California Lutheran University, Professor Rahuldeep Singh Gill.

Friday, November 15, 2019

Pilgrimage and Identity Formation in Taiwan

Colloquium | November 15 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Craig Quintero, Associate Professor, Chair, Department of Theatre and Dance, Grinnell College

 SanSan Kwan, Associate Professor, Theater Dance and Performance Studies, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

In 1991, the Taiwanese experimental theatre company U Theatre started incorporating the Baishatun Matsu pilgrimage into their actor training. The actors joined thousands of Taiwanese pilgrims in the religious procession devoted to the goddess Matsu, walking 350 kilometers from Baishatun to Bei-gang in nine days. During the late 1990s, an increasing number of experimental theatre companies also...   More >

Saturday, November 16, 2019

Journalist Ravish Kumar - The 3rd Bhattacharya Lecture on the "Future of India": Title TBD

Lecture | November 16 | 2-5 p.m. |  TBD

 Ravish Kumar, Writer, Journalist and Media Personality

 Pradeep Chhibber, Professor of Political Science and Indo-American Community Chair in India Studies, UC Berkeley; Abhishek Kaicker, Assistant Professor of History, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Bhattacharya India Fund at UC Berkeley

Ravish Kumar delivers the 3rd lecture in this newly established lecture series on the Future of India.

Thursday, November 21, 2019

The Daily Life of Betel: from Leaf to Nut, Preparation to Ritual

Lecture | November 21 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Deepa Natarajan, UC Botanical Garden

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, Institute for South Asia Studies, Botanical Garden

Betel nuts (Areca catechu) and leaves (Piper betle), are for many, a part of daily life in Southern India. Come explore the world of vethela paaku (the preparation of betel leaves and nuts) through a visual journey through Southern India.

Deepa Natarajan is the Program Coordinator at the UC Botanical Garden at Berkeley, where she has transformed her love of plants into a year-round series of...   More >

 

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Wednesday, December 4, 2019

The Myth of Creative Destruction and a Spatial Critique of War in Vietnam

Lecture | December 4 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 David Biggs, Professor of History, UC Riverside

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

Prof. Biggs will draw from his new book to discuss how a spatial critique of the Vietnam War can unpack layers of historical experience that undermine discursive efforts to flatten or erase traumatic memories in such spaces.

David Biggs

Thursday, December 5, 2019

The Age of Intoxication: Psychoactive Drugs in World History

Lecture | December 5 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Benjamin Breen, UC Santa Cruz

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

How have perceptions of drugs changed over time? This lecture will explore the history of drugs in the colonial era and beyond.

Eating the flesh of an Egyptian mummy prevents the plague. Distilled poppies reduce melancholy. A Turkish drink called coffee increases alertness. Tobacco cures cancer. Such beliefs circulated in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, an era when the term “drug”...   More >

 

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Friday, December 6, 2019

Worlding the narod: Recontextualizing the Chinese Reading of Russian Realism

Colloquium | December 6 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Roy Chan, Assistant Professor, Chinese Literature, University of Oregon

 Edward Tyerman, Assistant Professor, Russian and Comparative Literature, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

This talks aims to examine the various ways in which Russian ideas about realism circulated in China, with particular emphasis on the People's Republic of China's deep engagement with Russian and Soviet literature. As the "the people" (renmin) constituted a normative pillar that was central to the PRC's political legitimacy, aesthetic practices designed to provide representational articulation of...   More >

Friday, March 6, 2020

Talk by Prof. Karuna Mantena - Celebrating the 150th Birth Anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi: Title TBD

Lecture | March 6 | 4-6 p.m. | 10 Stephens Hall

 Karuna Mantena, Professor of Political Science, Columbia University

 Munis Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Professor of India Studies; Associate Professor in the Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by Columbia University Political Scientist and scholar of Gandhi and non-violence studies Professor Karuna Mantena.

Exhibits and Ongoing Events

Pleasure, Poison, Prescription, Prayer: The Worlds of Mind-Altering Substances

Exhibit - Artifacts | March 15 – December 15, 2019 every Sunday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday | 11 a.m.-5 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

If you sip a cup of coffee, are you on drugs? If you try psychedelics, are you committing a crime? If you have a sweet tooth, are you a sugar addict?


Since the beginning of human existence, peoples of the world have altered their minds with countless plant-based substances. They have done so for many reasons, ranging from pleasure to health to ceremony, with effects both harmful and benign,...   More >