Upcoming Events

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Towards a Romantic Anthropology: River Life and Climate Change in Bangladesh

Lecture | January 24 | 5-7 p.m. | 470 Stephens Hall

 Naveeda Khan, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Johns Hopkins University

 The Program in Critical Theory, Institute for South Asia Studies, The Subir and Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies

There is a quality of the chimerical to the silt islands that form and dissolve within the Jamuna River. Life on the islands never quite settles; the ground is constantly turned up, shifting, moving, and reforming elsewhere, a condition which inevitably grounds a particularly striking relationship with Nature. In this talk, I want think with this quality, through its manifestations in the...   More >

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Khojaly Tragedy: Beyond State Ideologies

Lecture | January 25 | 5-7 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Nona R. Shahnazarian, Social Anthropologist, Institute of Ethnography, National Academy of Sciences, Yerevan, Armenia

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program

Dr. Shahnazarian's research focuses on the recent history of ultra-nationalism and ethnic violence in Armenia and Azerbaijan, and its consequences for the local populations. It gives attention to the case of Khojaly. Khojaly was a settlement in Nagorno Karabakh situated on a major road and near the only airport in Karabakh, being the second largest town in Nagorno-Karabakh populated mainly by...   More >

Friday, January 27, 2017

Staging Courtesans: Liang Chenyu’s (1519-1591) Washing Gauze (Huansha ji) and the Performance Culture of Late Sixteenth-Century China

Colloquium | January 27 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Ling Hon Lam, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley

 Peng Xu, Center for Chinese Studies Postdoctoral Fellow 2016-2017;

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

This paper seeks to read Liang Chenyu’s dramatic masterpiece, Washing Gauze (Huansha ji), with reference to the rise of courtesans as “theater women” and the subsequent changes in the performance culture in the late sixteenth century. It argues that the play explodes the literary tradition to which it belong by staging female chorus, dance forms and their training sessions, and outdoors music...   More >

Saturday, January 28, 2017

Global History Series: Power and Authority: Understanding Genocide: The Khmer Rouge

Workshop | January 28 | 9 a.m.-3 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 

UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project, UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

 UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

Join us for the second of three sessions exploring the theme of Power and Authority. This program is designed to help educators prepare students to understand cross-regional and thematic elements in global history. The workshop includes a scholar lecture, model lesson, and collaborative planning time.

 

  RSVP online by January 15.

Monday, January 30, 2017

Leningrad Underground Poets and the Russian Poetic Tradition: How to Write Yourself Into the Canon

Colloquium | January 30 | 4-6 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Josephine von Zitzewitz, Leverhulme Early Career Fellow, Department of Slavonic Studies, Faculty of Modern & Medieval Languages, University of Cambridge

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

The second lecture in the Spring 2017 Slavic Colloquium series.

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Stabilizing Quality in Inner Mongolian Milk

Lecture | January 31 | 4 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Franck Bille, Visiting Scholar, UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative

 Megan Tracy, Sociology and Anthropology James Madison University 

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative

In this paper, I examine how actors attempt to transfer material and symbolic value and transfer notions of “human quality” across other notions of quality, such as product quality and the presumed caliber of particular places where production occurs. This transference of quality is embedded, for example, in notions that ethnic Mongolians are pre-disposed to produce a quality dairy product. I...   More >

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

The US, China, and Cross-Strait Relations

Lecture | February 1 | 12:15 p.m. | Women's Faculty Club, Lounge

 Hung-Mao Tien, President, Institute for National Policy Research, and former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Taiwan

 T.J. Pempel, Political Science, UC Berkeley

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Hung-mao Tien, President, Institute for National Policy Research, and former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Taiwan, will speak about cross-Strait relations under the new U.S. administration.

Hung-Mao Tien is President and board chairman, Institute for National Policy Research, and former R.O.C. Minister of Foreign Affairs; Representative (Ambassador) to the United Kingdom, and Presidential Advisor.

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Film Screening: People are the Sky: A Journey to North Korea

Film - Documentary | February 2 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Dai Sil Kim-Gibson, Filmmaker

 John Lie, UC Berkeley

 Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

Director Dai Sil Kim-Gibson is the first Korean American filmmaker to be given official permission by the North Korean government to film inside its borders. Kim-Gibson seamlessly weaves her own personal story as a native born North Korean, with the fractious history of the North/South division.

Music and Song from Mongolia

Performing Arts - Music | February 2 | 7:30 p.m. | Cal State University, East Bay, Recital Hall (MB1055), Music Building

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Music Department, Cal State University East Bay, Department of Music

An exploration of the diversity of Mongolian music, from traditional folk to folk-inspired hip-hop, mixing ethnographic video and audio recordings, narration, and live musical performance.

Performers and speakers include:
Charlotte D’Evelyn, Loyola Marymount University
Urtaa Gantulga, Musician
Tamir Hargana, Northern Illinois University
Peter Marsh, California State University, East...   More >

Friday, February 3, 2017

Environmental Narratives in Mongolian Sound Worlds

Conference/Symposium | February 3 | 1-6:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Cal State University East Bay, Department of Music

Urbanization, globalization, and climate change have had a powerful effect on the ways Mongolians and Inner Mongolians relate to their environment, and this is transforming many of their cultural forms. This conference seeks to increase awareness of the relationships been musical expression and the ecological, economic and political issues impacting residents in different ethnic groups in both...   More >

Biye Dance, photo by Peter Marsh

Saturday, February 4, 2017

Mongolian Throat-Singing (Khöömii)Workshop

Workshop | February 4 | 9 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Institute of East Asian Studies, 1995 University Avenue, Suite 510

  , Berkeley, CA 94704

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Music Department, Cal State East Bay

An opportunity to learn the Inner Asian vocal technique of throat-singing, through which one can produce multiple vocal lines simultaneously, from expert practitioners in an intimate learning environment. This workshop is offered in conjunction with the February 3 symposium "Environmental Narratives in Mongolian Sound Worlds."

Pre-registration is REQUIRED. To apply, please send an email with...   More >

Monday, February 6, 2017

From Mass Science to Participatory Action Research: Maoist Legacies in Contemporary Chinese Knowledge Production

Colloquium | February 6 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Andrew F. Jones, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley

 Sigrid Schmalzer, History, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

One of the signature elements of Mao-era science was the insistence on mobilizing the masses. Today, propaganda accounts of such activities ring hollow—or at best perhaps chime quaint. Yet some Chinese social scientists are eagerly adopting the theory and language of "participatory action research," an academic field that emerged out of the 1960s and 1970s global radicalism in which Maoist...   More >

Literary Success and the Russian Internet: How Online Publics Shape Contemporary Poetics

Colloquium | February 6 | 4-6 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Bradley Gorski, PhD Candidate, Slavic Languages and Literatures, Columbia University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

The third lecture in the Spring 2017 Slavic Colloquium series.

The Circle ("Der Kreis")

Film - Feature | February 6 | 6-9 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Stefan Haupt

 Institute of European Studies

Stefan Haupt's film uncovers the fascinating universe of one of the first gay liberation communities. Enriched by impressive conversational records with Ernst Ostertag and Röbi Rapp, the film depicts a decades-long love story – made taboo by society – and reveals the couple's inspiring self-knowledge and courage.

The Circle won the Panorama Audience Award and the Teddy Award at the Berlinale,...   More >

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Agribusiness from the Ashes: Land Governance Reform and Racialized Armed Territories in Burma

Lecture | February 7 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Kevin Woods, Ph.D. candidate, Environmental Science, Policy & Management, UC Berkeley

 Joshua Muldavin, Professor of Human Geography, Sarah Lawrence College

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

The presentation demonstrates how contemporary land governance reform in Burma, despite excitement on the opportunity for a “fresh start,” is borne out of legacies of war, racialized subjects, and state territorial politics.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Rabih Alameddine on "The Angel of History"

Workshop | February 8 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Rabih Alameddine

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Near Eastern Studies, Department of English, Center for Race and Gender

Rabih Alameddine is the author of six novels--including the National Book Award finalist An Unnecessary Woman and the international bestseller The Hakawati--as well as a Twitter feed that The New Yorker called "a work of art." His most recent novel, The Angel of History, follows Yemeni-born poet Jacob as he reckons with his childhood in an Egyptian brothel, the AIDS crisis in San Francisco,...   More >

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Bad Transitions after Free Elections: 32nd Annual Colin and Elsa Miller Lecture

Lecture | February 9 | 5-7 p.m. | Faculty Club, Heyns Room

 Leszek Balcerowicz, Professor of Economics and Former Chairman of the National Bank of Poland and Former Deputy Prime Minister of Poland, College of Europe

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Professor of Economics at the Warsaw School of Economics (WSE), former Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, former President of the National Bank of Poland (NBP). He is the architect of Poland’s economic reforms initiated in 1989; he has been at the center of Poland’s economic and political life since the fall of communism in Poland in 1989. Author of more than 100 publications on...   More >

Friday, February 10, 2017

Poland’s Transition after Socialism: A Roundtable Discussion

Panel Discussion | February 10 | 12-1:45 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Leszek Balcerowicz, Professor of Economics; Former Chairman of the National Bank of Poland and Former Deputy Prime Minister of Poland, College of Europe; Anna Grzymala-Busse, Michelle and Kevin Douglas Professor of International Studies, Senior Fellow at Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University; Anthony Levitas, Visiting Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs, Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, Brown University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Three leading scholars will discuss Poland's transition from communism to its present-day position as a member of the European Union.

“Havresc: Stand on Courage”

Film - Documentary | February 10 | 7:15-9:15 p.m. | 105 North Gate

 David Ritter, Documentarian, Director of "Havresc: Stand on Courage"

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program

“Havresc: Stand on Courage” is a documentary on the struggles of Armenian and Assyrian Christian Iraqis and the village they have formed on the edge of ISIS controlled territory. This small village has survived several attacks at the hands of ISIS militants with a fighting force of twenty two men. With little money, resources or support the people of this village have maintained one of the last...   More >

Monday, February 13, 2017

Syria: Spaces of War: CMES Visiting Scholars Lecture Series

Lecture | February 13 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Sofia Shwayri, CMES Visiting Scholar

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Staging Internationalism: Documentary and Translation in Roar, China! and The Red Poppy

Colloquium | February 13 | 4-6 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Edward Tyerman, Term Assistant Professor, Slavic Department, Barnard College

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

The fourth lecture in the Spring 2017 Slavic Colloquium series.

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

The Art of Indonesian Batik

Lecture | February 14 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Dalmini, Kebon Indah batik cooperative

 Daniel Gundlach, The Language of Cloth

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Consulate General of the Republic of Indonesia San Francisco

Batik, meaning the technique of applying wax to cloth and dyeing it, is practiced in many parts of the world but is particularly associated with Java, Indonesia where the craft has been practiced for centuries and where it has reached levels of great artistry. This event will review how batik is made, stressing the traditional methods.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Cine Latino: Aquarius

Film - Feature | February 15 | 7-9 p.m. | 105 North Gate Hall

 Center for Latin American Studies

2-15 In Aquarius, a vibrant retired music critic (Sonia Braga) engages in a “cold war” with developers trying to evict her from her home.

 Note: This film is rated 16+ for references to drugs and some sexual content

Sônia Braga stars in Kleber Mendonça Filho’s new film “Aquarius.”

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Bangladeshi Lawyer and Human Rights Activist, Sara Hossain delivers the Chowdhury Center Distinguished Lecture for 2017: Title TBD

Lecture | February 16 | 5-7 p.m. |  TBD

 Sara Hossain, Lawyer at the Supreme Court of Bangladesh and an honorary executive director of Bangladesh Legal Aid and Services Trust (BLAST)

 The Subir and Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

A lecture by Bangladeshi Lawyer and Human Rights Activist, Sara Hossain.

Smart Nation: A Blueprint for Modern Armenia

Lecture | February 16 | 8-10 p.m. |  Calvary Armenian Congregational Church

 725 Brotherhood Way, San Francisco, CA 94132

 Sassoon Grigorian, Head of Public Policy, Australia and New Zealand, Salesforce

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program

At a critical juncture in its history, this book explores the challenges and opportunities for Armenia, with clear public policy recommendations.

Armenia is a Smart Nation, it has one of the highest literacy rates globally, it is a recognised world leader in the strategy game of chess, Armenians have been credited with many innovations and inventions used today, and its future success will in...   More >

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Real vs. Fake Investors: Race, Security and Citizenship in ‘Post-Africanization’ Uganda

Colloquium | February 21 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Dr. Anneeth Kaur Hundle, Assistant Professor, University of California, Merced

 Center for African Studies

One of the Center for African Studies weekly sessions in our Spring 2017 Colloquium Series.

Anneeth Kaur Hundle

The Dialectics of Enlightenment," Soviet Style: Reconsidering Social Progress in the Literature and Film of the Thaw Era

Colloquium | February 21 | 4-6 p.m. | 4337 Dwinelle Hall

 Ilya Kukulin, Associate Professor, School of Cultural Studies, Faculty of Humanities, Higher School of Economics, Moscow

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

The fifth lecture in the Spring 2017 Slavic Colloquium series.

The Russian Challenge In The Next Four Years

Lecture | February 21 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Dr. Eugene Rumer, Senior Fellow and Director, Russia and Eurasia Program, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

 Institute of International Studies, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Eugene Rumer is a senior fellow and the director of Carnegie’s Russia and Eurasia Program.

Rumer’s research focuses on political, economic, and security trends in Russia and former Soviet states, as well as on U.S. policy toward that region.

Prior to joining Carnegie, Rumer was the national intelligence officer for Russia and Eurasia at the U.S. National Intelligence Council from 2010 to...   More >

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Recital of Chinese Opera

Performing Arts - Music | February 22 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Peng Xu, Center for Chinese Studies postdoctoral fellow, 2016-2017

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS), Institute of East Asian Studies

《彈詞》 "The Ballad"
A Performance from Chinese opera

This famous excerpt from the poet Hong Sheng’s (1645-1704) southern drama Palace of Lasting Life (1688) consists of ten solos sung by the character Li Guinian, a former leading musician from the Pear Garden Academy at the glorious Tang (685-762) court, now a performer reduced to singing popular ballads in the...   More >

Ankhi Mukherjee | Unseen City: Travelling Psychoanalysis and the Urban Poor

Lecture | February 22 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Ankhi Mukherjee, Professor of English and World Literatures in the Faculty of English and a Tutorial Fellow at Wadham College, University of Oxford

 Poulomi Saha, Assistant Professor of English, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Department of English, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by Ankhi Mukherjee, Professor of English and World Literatures in the Faculty of English and a Tutorial Fellow at Wadham College, University of Oxford

Thursday, February 23, 2017

The Trump Administration’s Northeast Asia Policy: History and Security

Conference/Symposium | February 23 | 2-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Northeast Asian History Foundation, Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

This conference addresses the challenges of contemporary Northeast Asian security, focusing on the implications of the Trump administration’s policies for the region.

To Aleppo Gone: An Evening of Syrian Culture

Performing Arts - Other | February 23 | 6-9 p.m. | TBD UC Berkeley Campus

 Ahmad Diab, Assistant Professor, Department of Near Eastern Studies; Nathalie Khankan, Lecturer, Department of Near Eastern Studies

 Omar Offendum

 

Golden Thread Productions

DisOriental: Berkeley's MENA Music Ensemble

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Poetry reading from Berkeley faculty, stage reading of Mohammad al-Attar, performance by spoken word artist Omar Offendum, and music by members of Disoriental: Berkeley's MENA Music Ensemble.

Friday, February 24, 2017

East Asian Topologies of Power: An Interdisciplinary Cross-Currents Symposium

Conference/Symposium | February 24 | 1:30-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

This symposium will bring into conversation the guest editors of three recent issues of the UC Berkeley-based e-journal Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review and three additional East Asia scholars to explore the special issues’ thematic convergence on China and its neighbors, on space, and on cartography. Rather than regarding the emergence of the state as a top-down imposition,...   More >

Saturday, February 25, 2017

Global History Series: Power and Authority: Challenges to Colonialism in Africa

Workshop | February 25 | 9 a.m.-3 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 

UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project, UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

 UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

Join us for the final of three sessions exploring the theme of Power and Authority. This program is designed to help educators prepare students to understand cross-regional and thematic elements in global history. The workshop includes a scholar lecture, model lesson, and collaborative planning time.

 

  RSVP online by February 12.

Monday, February 27, 2017

Syrian Silos and Global Echo Chambers

Lecture | February 27 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Ahmad Diab, Department of Near Eastern Studies

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

The Director’s Cut: Challenges and Delights of Oral History Narratives with Syrian Refugee Women: CMES Visiting Scholars Lecture Series

Lecture | March 1 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Ozlem Ezer, CMES Visiting Scholar

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Graduate workshop to follow.

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Flood in Ba'ath Country: Contemporary Syrian Documentaries

Film - Documentary | March 2 | 5:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Flood in Ba'ath Country (2003, Omar Amiralay)

Contemporary Syrian Documentaries
curated by Nathalie Khankan (Near Eastern Studies)
in partnership with the Arab Film Festival

Part of "To Aleppo Gone:" Syrian Culture Today, series of programs exploring the arts in Syria.

Friday, March 3, 2017

Wide Angle, Close Up: Rethinking Twentieth-century Chinese Art

Colloquium | March 3 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Winnie Wong, Rhetoric, UC Berkeley

 Claire Roberts, Art History, School of Culture and Communications, University of Melbourne

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

This talk presents work-in-progress associated with the research project “Reconfiguring the World: China. Art. Agency 1900s to Now” which examines twentieth century Chinese art from an international perspective. It will focus on two early works by Xu Beihong (1895-1953) and Ye Qianyu (1907-1995), artists who have played key roles in the formation of xin guohua or what we have come to think of as...   More >

Talk by Prof. Robert Thurman: Title TBD

Lecture | March 3 | 6-8 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 Robert A. F. Thurman, Jey Tsong Khapa Professor of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Studies, Department of Religion, Columbia University; President, Tibet House U.S., President of the American Institute of Buddhist Studies

 Robert Goldman, Professor of Sanskrit, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Vedanta Society, Buddhist Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies

A lecture by Prof. Robert A. F. Thurman, professor of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist studies at Columbia University, and co-founder of Tibet House US, a nonprofit dedicated to the preservation and promotion of Tibetan civilization.

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Alliances In The Indo-Pacific; A Practitioner's Perspective

Lecture | March 7 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Vice Admiral Robert L. Thomas, Jr.

 Institute of International Studies

Vice Adm. Robert Thomas graduated from the University of California with a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. He holds a Master of Science in National Security Studies from the National War College.

As a career submarine officer, Thomas has served on fast-attack submarines operating in both U.S. Pacific Command and U.S. Central Command theaters of operation. His assignments included USS...   More >

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Islam and Christianity in Competition: Armenian Martyrdoms of the Late 12th Century

Lecture | March 8 | 4-6 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Sergio La Porta, Haig and Isabel Berberian Professor of Armenian Studies, California State University, Fresno

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program

On October 24, 1170, a Muslim convert to Christianity called Joseph was martyred by the Turkish Atabeg of Azerbaijan for apostasy in the city of Duin. Joseph’s martyrdom is just one of a series of martyrdoms from the second half of the twelfth century preserved in Armenian synaxaria and homiliaries. This presentation will argue that rather than reflect a climate of religious persecution and...   More >

Cine Latino: Gueros

Film - Feature | March 8 | 7-9 p.m. | 105 North Gate

 Center for Latin American Studies

Tomas is a boy from Veracruz, Mexico whose mother, fed up with his poor behavior, sends him to stay with his brother in Mexico City. His arrival coincides with a strike at the national university that leaves its students, including Tomas’ brother Sombra and Sombra’s roommate Santos, in an angst-ridden limbo. Hearing that Mexican folk-rock hero Epigmenio Cruz has been hospitalized somewhere in the...   More >

GUEROS Directed by Alonso Ruizpalacios

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Our Terrible Country: Contemporary Syrian Documentaries

Film - Documentary | March 9 | 5:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Our Terrible Country (2014, Ali Atassi)

Contemporary Syrian Documentaries
curated by Nathalie Khankan (Near Eastern Studies)
in partnership with the Arab Film Festival

Part of "To Aleppo Gone:" Syrian Culture Today, series of programs exploring the arts in Syria.

Friday, March 10, 2017

Katherine Schofield | The Place of Pleasure: Music in Mughal Thought and Society, 1593–1707

Lecture | March 10 | 12-2 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conference Room)

 Katherine Butler Schofield, Senior Lecturer in Music, King's College London

 Munis Faruqui, Associate Professor of South and Southeast Asian Studies, the University of California, Berkeley.

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative

A talk by Katherine Butler Schofield, cultural historian and ethnomusicologist whose work focuses on South Asia.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

The Perfect Dictatorship: China in the 21st Century

Lecture | March 14 | 12-2 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Rachel Stern, Berkeley School of Law

 Stein Ringen, Green Templeton College, University of Oxford

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Professor Ringen will presents his book, The Perfect Dictatorship: China in the 21st Century. The Chinese political economy is like no other system known to man, now or in history. This book explains how the system works and where it may be moving.
- What are the intentions and priorities of the Chinese leaders?
- What kind of leader is Xi Jinping, where is he leading China and how radically is...   More >

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Houses Without Doors: Contemporary Syrian Documentaries

Film - Documentary | March 16 | 5:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Houses Without Doors (2016, Avo Kaprealian)

Contemporary Syrian Documentaries
curated by Nathalie Khankan (Near Eastern Studies)
in partnership with the Arab Film Festival

Part of "To Aleppo Gone:" Syrian Culture Today, series of programs exploring the arts in Syria.

Monday, March 20, 2017

The Last Masquerade: Lermontov, Meyerhold, and the Revolution of 1917

Colloquium | March 20 | 4-6 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Anna Muza, Senior Lecturer, Russian Language, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

The sixth lecture in the Spring 2017 Slavic Colloquium series.

Obama's Legacy in the Middle East

Lecture | March 20 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 James Gelvin, Professor, History, UCLA

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Spring 2016 CMES Distinguished Visitor lecture.

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Queuing into the Afterlife: The Politics of Branding Buryat Buddhism

Lecture | March 21 | 4 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Tatiana Chudakova, Department of Anthropology, Tufts University

 Franck Billé, Visiting Scholar, UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Buddhist Studies

This paper discusses the inadvertent effects of transforming the marked into the marketable on the mundane strategies of “making a living,” both economically and cosmologically, in Buddhist Siberia. Building on anthropological discussions on marketing ethnicity, it tracks attempts to develop a regional brand in Buryatia, a self-governing republic within the Russian Federation that derives its...   More >

Buryat Buddhism

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Ordinary Ironies: Mao Badges and the Undermining of Chinese Socialism

Colloquium | March 22 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Wen-hsin Yeh, History, UC Berkeley

 Karl Gerth, History, UC San Diego

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Today’s bought, sold, collected, and inspected Mao badges seem to be at odds with their history as icons of loyalty to Mao Zedong during the early Cultural Revolution. I argue that the postsocialist era is not the antithesis of the socialist era. And that the current market craze for Mao badge collecting is a resurgence of badge market value. The irony was present all along and, indeed, the...   More >

South Asian Perspectives: Updates on Development and Democracy from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka

Panel Discussion | March 22 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Sanchita Saxena, Executive Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Director, Subir and Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies

 Abdullah Ahmadzai, The Asia Foundation Country Representative, Afghanistan

 Hasan Mazumdar, The Asia Foundation Country Representative, Bangladesh

 Sagar Prasai, The Asia Foundation Country Representative, India

 Sofia Shakil, The Asia Foundation Country Representative, Pakistan

 Dinesha de Silva, The Asia Foundation Country Representative, Sri Lanka

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Asia Foundation, The Subir and Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies, Himalayan Studies Program, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative

A panel discussion by panelists from The Asia Foundation on development and democracy in Asia.

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Enmity, Amity, Comity, Normality, Abnormality: Korea-U.S. Relations in the Post Geun-hye, Post Obama Era

Lecture | March 23 | 12 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Edward Dong, Former Senior Foreign Service rank of Minister-Counselor, US Department of State

 Laura Nelson, UC Berkeley

 Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

Korea-U.S. relations have historically been fraught, with Korea more often than not part of a sub-issue in broader contexts such as the Cold War in Asia, U.S.-China and U.S.-Japan relations, and global non-proliferation. Even on a bilateral basis, the relationship is often defined by North Korea/military alliance and economic/commercial factors, leading to frictions. In more recent years, the...   More >

Monday, April 3, 2017

Mongolian Archaeology: New Discoveries, New Concerns

Conference/Symposium | April 3 | 10 a.m.-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Smithsonian Institution

The ancient cultural interactions of Northeast Asia have left a now-imperiled record in stone across the steppes and forests of Mongolia. The historical implications of the archaeological record, and the race not only to study but to preserve this record in the face of growing threats from development, tourist access, and an insatiable art market, are the focus of this symposium, organized...   More >

Archaeology in Mongolia

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Duterte’s Violent “Right” Populism in the Philippines

Lecture | April 4 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Mark Thompson, Professor of Politics, City University of Hong Kong

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

Since his election, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has launched a violent crackdown on drugs. For many Filipinos, this state violence has created a sense of political order amidst weak institutions. Duterte's “right” populism shows similarities to illiberalism elsewhere in Southeast Asia but differs from “rich world” right populism represented by Trump and the European far right.

Mark Thompson

Friday, April 7, 2017

The Bishan Project: 2010-2016

Colloquium | April 7 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Ou Ning, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, Columbia University in the City of New York

 Weihong Bao, East Asian Languages and Cultures; Film Studies

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

The Bishan Project was not just an art project. It started out from wanting to address those imbalances between cities and the countryside that had manifested grim realities such as the deterioration of agricultural industries, rural villages, and farm laborer empowerment, and were the direct result of excessive urbanization. The project relied on the accumulated experience of the rural...   More >

Monday, April 10, 2017

Dostoevsky and the Riddle of the Self

Colloquium | April 10 | 4-6 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Yuri Corrigan, Assistant Professor of Russian & Comparative Literature, Boston University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

The seventh lecture in the Spring 2017 Slavic Colloquium series.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

The Structure of Speculation: Phnom Penh as a Real Estate Frontier

Lecture | April 11 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Sylvia Nam, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, UC Irvine

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

Sylvia Nam

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Beyond the American Era in the Middle East: An Evolving Landscape of Turbulence: CMES Visiting Scholars Lecture Series

Lecture | April 12 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Waleed Hazbun, CMES Visiting Scholar, American University of Beirut

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Lecture by Waleed Hazbun, Associate Professor of Political Studies at American University of Beirut and CMES Visiting Scholar.

Cover Girls: The Evolution of the Image of Female Stars in Chinese Movie Magazines from the 1920s to the Early Years of the People's Republic

Colloquium | April 12 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Paul Fonoroff, Independent film scholar

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

This talk will cover the evolution of the image of female stars from the 1920s to the early 1950s as reflected in their representation as "cover girls" from the 1920s (and the birth of Chinese movie "goddesses") to their makeover after the Communist victory in 1949. The talk will include many slides of images from the Fonoroff Collection, now held at the C.V. Starr East Asian Library.

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Cinema Beyond Melodrama: Lee Chang-dong and Divine Justice

Colloquium | April 13 | 4 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Steve Choe, San Francisco State University

 Jinsoo An, UC Berkeley

 Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

This presentation discusses two films by Lee Chang-dong, Secret Sunshine (2007) and Poetry (2010), to show how they attempt to think the concept of justice beyond the ethical and metaphysical principles proposed by the melodramatic mode in narrative cinema.

Sacred Singing: A Baul Performance by Parvathy Baul

Performing Arts - Dance | April 13 | 6-8 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 Parvathy Baul, Baul folk singer, musician and storyteller from Bengal

 Sukanya Chakrabarti, Performer

 The Subir & Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies, The Institute for South Asia Studies, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

An evening of Baul music with one of the few female Baul practitioners, the eminent Baul singer from Bengal, Parvathy Baul.

Friday, April 14, 2017

Offense! The Public Life of Injury in South Asia: The 6th South Asia by the Bay Graduate Student Conference at Stanford University, April 14 and 15, 2017

Conference/Symposium | April 14 – 15, 2017 every day | 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m. |  Stanford University

  Shields Ave

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Center for South Asia, Stanford University, University of California, Davis, University of California, Santa Cruz

The 6th South Asia by the Bay Graduate Student Conference held at Stanford University

The Quest for a Voice: Revisiting Asia’s Democratic Revolt

Conference/Symposium | April 14 | 1-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Korean Studies (CKS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

A quarter century ago, Mongolia, Asia’s first Communist power, was wracked by revolt among its young, educated elite, a revolt that ultimately culminated in the collapse of Communism and establishment of a democratic government . Only months earlier, demonstrations at Tiananmen had ended in tragedy and disaster. Earlier still, Kyongju’s youth rallied to the cry of democractic reform. ...   More >

Protest in Mongolia

The Quest for a Voice—Revisiting Asia’s Democratic Revolt

Panel Discussion | April 14 | 2-5 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Center for Korean Studies (CKS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

A quarter century ago, Mongolia, Asia’s first Communist power, was wracked by revolt among its young, educated elite, a revolt that culminated in the collapse of Communism and establishment of a democratic government. Earlier, demonstrations at Tiananmen had ended in tragedy and disaster. Earlier still, Kyongju’s youth rallied to the cry of democratic reform.
Looking back at this period...   More >

Saturday, April 15, 2017

Offense! The Public Life of Injury in South Asia: The 6th South Asia by the Bay Graduate Student Conference at Stanford University, April 14 and 15, 2017

Conference/Symposium | April 14 – 15, 2017 every day | 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m. |  Stanford University

  Shields Ave

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Center for South Asia, Stanford University, University of California, Davis, University of California, Santa Cruz

The 6th South Asia by the Bay Graduate Student Conference held at Stanford University

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

In Kabul, A Murder: CMES Visiting Scholars Lecture Series

Lecture | April 19 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Fatima Mojaddedi, UC President's Postdoctoral Fellow in Anthropology

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Lecture by Fatima Mojaddedi, UC President's Postdoctoral Fellow in Anthropology.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Kirti Jain | Performing Partition: On Producing "Aur Kitne Tukde" (How Many Fragments?)

Lecture | April 20 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conference Room)

 Kirti Jain, Theatre historian, Stage Play Director, and (Former) Director of National School of Drama, India

 Vasudha Paramasivan, Assistant Professor Dept. of South and Southeast Asian Studies University of California, Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, The 1947 Partition Archive

Prof. Kirti Jain, eminent theatre historian and prominent stage play director from India, discusses Aur Kitne Tukde (How Many Fragments?), a play inspired by Urvashi Butalia's The Other Side of Silence that dramatizes hard hitting stories about gendered violence during the Partition.

Monday, April 24, 2017

China’s Economic Statecraft Toward Myanmar and North Korea

Colloquium | April 24 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Kevin O'Brien, Political Science, UC Berkeley

 James Reilly, Government and International Relations, University of Sydney

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Tempted by their expansive authority over China’s economy, Chinese leaders are increasingly deploying economic resources such as foreign aid and overseas investments to influence policy decisions in other countries. To implement economic statecraft, China’s leaders rely upon state-owned companies, bureaucratic agencies, and local Chinese officials, even though they may be unreliable...   More >

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Interdisciplinary Approaches to Early Korea

Conference/Symposium | April 27 | 10 a.m.-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

Early Korea is an interdisciplinary field that seeks to understand human society on the Korean peninsula in ancient times, make the case for the relevance of the region to world history and archaeology, and critically appraise how ancient history is used in the present to foster notions of Korean identity.

6 Days, 50 Years: 1967 and the Politics of Time: Keynote Address

Conference/Symposium | April 27 | 7-9 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Noura Erakat, George Mason University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

“Taking the Land Without the People: International Law and the 1967 War”

Friday, April 28, 2017

6 Days, 50 Years: 1967 and the Politics of Time: Panel Discussion

Conference/Symposium | April 28 | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Joel Beinin, Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History and Professor of Middle East History, Stanford University; Smadar Ben Natan, Visiting Scholar, Berkeley Law, Tel Aviv University; Leena Dallasheh, Assistant Professor, Humboldt State University; Sreemati Mitter, Kutayba Alghanim Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern History and International and Public Affairs, Brown University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the 1967 Middle East war, the Centers for Middle Eastern Studies at UC Berkeley, UCLA, and UC Santa Barbara will host contemporaneous panels to address this significant milestone through the meta narrative of “6 Days, 50 Years: 1967 and the Politics of Time.” At UC Berkeley, we will convene a panel of experts to reflect on how horizons of the future were...   More >

Friday, May 5, 2017

Return of Ten Thousand Dharmas: A Celebration in Honor of Patricia Berger

Conference/Symposium | May 5 | 4-6 p.m. | David Brower Center, Goldman Theater

 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Patricia Berger, History of Art, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Patricia Berger served as the curator of Chinese art at the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco from 1982 to 1994. She then returned to her alma mater to mentor another generation of graduate students as Professor of Chinese Art at the University of California at Berkeley. In celebration of her well-deserved retirement, we invite you to join her current and former students and colleagues to honor her...   More >

Saturday, May 6, 2017

Return of Ten Thousand Dharmas: A Celebration in Honor of Patricia Berger

Conference/Symposium | May 6 | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | Faculty Club, Heyns Room

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

This event begins on Friday, May 5, 4 pm, Brower Center with a keynote speech by Professor Berger.

Patricia Berger served as the curator of Chinese art at the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco from 1982 to 1994. She then returned to her alma mater to mentor another generation of graduate students as Professor of Chinese Art at the University of California at Berkeley. In celebration of her...   More >

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Chinese Overseas: Celebrating the Legacy of Scholarship and Collection Treasures at UC Berkeley

Conference/Symposium | October 5 | 8:10 a.m.-4 p.m. | Doe Library, Morrison Library (101 Doe Library)

 Ling-Chi Wang, Professor Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley

 Penny Edwards, Associate Professor, University of California, Berkeley; Harvey Dong, Lecturer, University of California, Berkeley; Sine Hwang Jensen, Asian American Studies & Comparative Ethnic Studies Librarian, University of California, Berkeley; Theresa Salazar, Curator, Bancroft Collection of Western Americana, University of California, Berkeley; Jianye He, Librarian for Chinese Collections, University of California, Berkeley; Virginia Shih, Librarian for Southeast Asian Collections, University of California, Berkeley

 Library

The keynote address, presentations, and tours of various UC Berkeley libraries will highlight the past, present, and future of Chinese overseas scholarship and curatorship.