Upcoming Events

Thursday, January 18, 2018

From Communism to Authoritarianism via Democracy. The Puzzle of Political Transformations in East Central Europe

Lecture | January 18 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Grzegorz Ekiert, Laurence A. Tisch Professor of Government, Harvard University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Institute of International Studies

During the first two decades after 1989, countries of East Central Europe experienced a swift and successful democratization process and a relatively painless transition to a market economy. Consolidation of liberal democracy and working market economy opened the door to their accession to the NATO and the European Union. By 2004, it seemed that these countries became “normal” European...   More >

Off Frame AKA Revolution Until Victory: 70th Anniversary of Al-Nakba Film Series

Film - Documentary | January 18 | 6-8 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Arab Film Festival

First of a three-part film series presented by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies in partnership with The Arab Film Festival on the 70th anniversary of Al-Nakba of 1948.

Friday, January 19, 2018

MENA Salon: Austerity and Unrest in Tunisia

Workshop | January 19 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Tunisia is often said to be the Arab Spring’s only success story, yet the new year has been marked by economic peril and political uncertainty. In this week’s MENA Salon we will discuss the recent unrest in Tunisia, and whether or not the government is fulfilling obligations set out under its post-Revolution constitution.

Recommended reading available here: http://cmes.berkeley.edu/mena-salon/

Imagining Sculpture in China

Colloquium | January 19 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Winnie Wong, Rhetoric, UC Berkeley

 Stanley Abe, Art, Art History, and Visual Studies, Duke University

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

There was no such thing as sculpture in China until the early twentieth century. Sculpture is a specifically European category of Fine Art which we apply to figural objects from many places. But sculpture did not exist in most of the world, certainly not in China, until the European term was applied on a global scale. The presentation will be a reflection about a book in progress—a picture...   More >

Sunday, January 21, 2018

Memorial Service in Honor of Professor Hong Yung Lee (1939-2017)

Reception | January 21 | 2-5 p.m. | Faculty Club, Great Hall

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Korean Studies (CKS), Department of Political Science, Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Please join us for a celebration of Professor Hong Yung Lee’s life and career on January 21, 2018 at UC Berkeley, where he was on the faculty for nearly three decades.

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Women on Africa's constitutional and supreme courts: When, where, and why?

Colloquium | January 23 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Alice Kang, Associate Professor, Political Science and Ethnic Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

 Center for African Studies

This is a meeting of the weekly colloquium for the Center for African Studies.

Alice Kang

Metropolitan Migrations and Interwar Vietnamese Culture

Lecture | January 23 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Charles Keith, Associate Professor of History, Michigan State University

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

This talk will explore the close ties between Vietnamese migration to France and interwar Vietnamese culture and, as such, the importance of these migrations for postcolonial Vietnam.

Charles Keith

Thursday, January 25, 2018

Immigration of European Highly Skilled Workers to Germany: Intra-EU Brain Circulation or Brain Drain/Gain?

Lecture | January 25 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Céline Teney, University of Bremen, Germany

 Institute of European Studies

Based on a unique representative survey and semi-structured interviews of non-German EU physicians working in Germany, Céline Teney will investigate whether intra-EU highly skilled immigrants who exert a profession suffering from an acute EU labour shortage constitute the manifestation of an integrated European labour market – conceptualized as brain circulation – or whether they contribute to...   More >

Stitching Palestine: 70th Anniversary of Al-Nakba Film Series

Film - Documentary | January 25 | 6-8 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Arab Film Festival

Second of a three-part film series presented by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies in partnership with The Arab Film Festival on the 70th anniversary of Al-Nakba of 1948, one of the Middle East's most defining episodes.

Friday, January 26, 2018

MENA Salon

Workshop | January 26 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Every Friday in the semester, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies hosts an informal weekly coffee hour and guided discussion of current events in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), open to all and free of charge. Check the calendar the Monday before the Salon for the current week's topic.

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

A Story of Subversion, a Story of Anticipation

Colloquium | January 30 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Hallie Wells, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

 Center for African Studies

Slam—a performance poetry competition created in Chicago in the 1980s—has circulated around the world, but in Madagascar it has flourished in a context of a uniquely rich history of verbal arts that are thoroughly entwined with social and political life. As an artistic movement that emphasizes the co-production of authority between performer and audience, slam is part of a significant shift in...   More >

Thursday, February 1, 2018

The Gendered Politics of Socialist Consumption in North Korea, 1953-1965

Colloquium | February 1 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Andre Schmid, University of Toronto

 Laura Nelson, UC Berkeley

 Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

How was ‘proper’ consumption conceived in the newly emergent socialist order of North Korea? Despite the desire of the Party-state to represent a population united around the Kim family and the (not unrelated) tendency of foreign observers to see North Korea as an extreme case of totalitarianism, there was in fact no straightforward answer to this question in the early postwar years.

Maya Tudor | Nationalism as a Democratic Resource: Comparing India and Pakistan at 70

Lecture | February 1 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conference Room) | Note change in date

 Maya Tudor, Associate Professor of Government and Public Policy, Blavatnik School of Government Fellow, St. Hilda's College, Oxford University

 Munis Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & South East Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative, Department of Political Science

Dr. Maya Tudor, Associate Professor of Government and Public Policy, Blavatnik School of Government Fellow, St. Hilda's College, Oxford University

A Man Returned: 70th Anniversary of Al-Nakba Film Series

Film - Feature | February 1 | 6-7 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Arab Film Festival

Director: Mahdi Fleifel
Country: Lebanon, Palestine 2016
Languages: Arabic
Short Film
30 mins - Color

Reda is 26 years old. His dreams of escaping the Palestinian refugee camp Ain El-Hilweh in Lebanon ended in failure after three years trapped in Greece. He returned with a drug addiction to life in a camp torn apart by internal strife and the encroachment of war from Syria. Against all...   More >

Friday, February 2, 2018

MENA Salon

Workshop | February 2 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Every Friday in the semester, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies hosts an informal weekly coffee hour and guided discussion of current events in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), open to all and free of charge. Check the calendar the Monday before the Salon for the current week's topic.

Monday, February 5, 2018

What's in a grape? Science, politics, and the race for authenticity in the West Bank wineries

Lecture | February 5 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Ariel Handel, Tel Aviv University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

"Israel aims to recreate wine that Jesus and King David drank," reads a New York Times title in 2015, telling the story of a new wine, Marawi. The Marawi (also known as Hamdani" grape species is, needless to say, not new. Nevertheless, along with several other grape varieties it recently goes through an identity metamorphosis as part of an economic, cultural, and political race for authenticity....   More >

John E. Cort | No One Gives like the Guru

Lecture | February 5 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 John E. Cort, Professor of Asian and Comparative Religions and the Judy Gentili Chair in International Studies at Denison University

 Munis Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Professor of India Studies; Associate Professor of South & Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by John E. Cort, Professor of Asian and Comparative Religions and the Judy Gentili Chair in International Studies at Denison University.

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

The Fante Confederation never happened: silence, space, and the earnest historian in West Africa

Colloquium | February 6 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Trevor Getz, Professor and Chair, Department of History, San Francisco State University

 Center for African Studies

This is a meeting of the weekly colloquium for the Center for African Studies.

Trevor Getz with local scholar in Ghana

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

How Did US-Russian Relations Get So Bad and How Might They Be Improved?

Colloquium | February 7 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues), Wildavsky Conference Room

 George Breslauer, Professor of the Graduate School, The Charles and Louise Travers Department of Political Science, UC Berkeley

 Institute for the Study of Societal Issues

The current hostility in US-Russian relations goes back to the aftermath of the collapse of the USSR and the formal end of the Cold War. US International behavior in Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa progressively alienated Russian leaders, leading, under Putin, to sharp reactions. In response to those reactions, US leaders of both parties came to demonize Russia and Putin and to up the...   More >

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Buddhism and Divination in Tibet

Lecture | February 8 | 5-7 p.m. | Faculty Club, Heyns Room

 Brandon Dotson, Georgetown University

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

As a poor cousin of both science and religion, a begrudged relative of ritual, and a strange bedfellow of play, divination persists at the margins of established traditions. Buddhism shows some ambivalence toward divination, sometimes barely tolerating it, and other times making full use of divination as a medium for Buddhist messages. Buddhists, for their part, have employed divination in much...   More >

We Crossed a Bridge and It Trembled: Voices from Syria

Lecture | February 8 | 5:30-7 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Wendy Pearlman, Northwestern University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Author Wendy Pearlman presents her book, We Crossed a Bridge and it Trembled: Voices from Syria, which is an astonishing collection of intimate wartime testimonies and poetic fragments from a cross-section of Syrians whose lives have been transformed by revolution, war, and flight.

Wendy Pearlman is a professor at Northwestern University, specializing in Middle East politics.

Friday, February 9, 2018

MENA Salon

Workshop | February 9 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Every Friday in the semester, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies hosts an informal weekly coffee hour and guided discussion of current events in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), open to all and free of charge. Check the calendar the Monday before the Salon for the current week's topic.

Spreading the Word: Woodblock Publishing Sites and Book Distribution Networks in the Qing

Colloquium | February 9 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Cynthia Brokaw, History, Brown University

 Michael Nylan, History, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

The commercial publishing boom of the late Ming was largely a regional phenomenon, as most businesses of any size were confined to the cities of Jiangnan and Jianyang (in northern Fujian). By the eighteenth century, however, the geography of commercial publishing had changed, as more and more entrepreneurs, responding to a rising demand for texts, founded important publishing operations in the...   More >

Monday, February 12, 2018

In Search of Modern Iran

Lecture | February 12 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Abbas Amanat, Yale University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Abbas Amanat will talk about the challenges and rewards of writing a longue dureé covering early modern and modern history of Iran. His new book: Iran: A Modern History (Yale University Press, 2017) looks at five centuries of national and transnational history and explores overarching themes that connect the history of the Safavids Empire and emergence of the religion-state symbiosis with modes...   More >

Matthew Hull | Satisfied Callers: Police and Corporate Customer Service in India

Lecture | February 12 | 2-4 p.m. | Kroeber Hall, 221 (Gifford Room)

 Matthew Hull, Associate Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Michigan

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Department of Anthropology, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Cyborg Linguistics (Townsend Center Working Group), Form and Formalism (Townsend Center Working Group)

A talk by anthropologist Dr. Matthew Hull.

The Displacement of Borders among Russian Koreans in Northeast Asia

Colloquium | February 12 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Hyun-Gwi Park, University of Cambridge

 Steven Lee, UC Berkeley

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Korean Studies (CKS), Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Mongolia Initiative

Since the late nineteenth century, ethnic Koreans have represented a small yet significant portion of the population of the Russian Far East, but until now, the phenomenon has been largely understudied. Based on extensive historical and ethnographic research, this is the first book in English to chart the contemporary social life of Koreans in the complex borderland region. Dispelling the...   More >

Ludmila Ulitskaya’s Daniel Stein: Teenage Translator, Trusted Tour Guide, and a Text Transfigured

Colloquium | February 12 | 4-5:30 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Judith Deutsch Kornblatt, Professor Emerita, Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Wisconsin - Madison

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

This is the first lecture of the Spring 2018 Slavic Graduate Colloquium lecture series.

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Ancient Icons/Modern Russia

Lecture | February 13 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Judith Deutsch Kornblatt, Professor Emerita, Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Wisconsin - Madison

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

This lecture and slide show examines the history, theology, and presentation of Russian icons, from their beginnings through the twentieth century and into post-Soviet times. It will demonstrate how these sacred objects have permeated even secular Russian culture, including modernist art, poetry, advertising, and popular memes.

Africanisation and Government Intelligence: the Politics of Security in the Gold Coast, 1948 - 1957

Colloquium | February 13 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Chase Arnold, PhD Candidate, UC Berkeley Department of History

 Center for African Studies

In 1948, the Gold Coast witnessed a week of rioting sparked by political protest and violent confrontation with police. After the riots, the British and Gold Coast governments implemented numerous political reforms, transitioning the colony toward self-rule and, eventually, independence. The riots also spurred security reform in the Gold Coast. For many in Accra and London, the riots demonstrated...   More >

Thursday, February 15, 2018

The Merit of Words and Letters: Sutra Recitation in Japanese Zen

Lecture | February 15 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Erez Joskovich, UC Berkeley

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

Classical Chan/Zen literature is famous for its disparagement of scriptural authority, ranging from the well-known slogan “separate transmission outside the scriptures...,” attributed to Bodhidharma, to stories of renowned Zen masters abusing Buddhist scriptures. Nevertheless, similar to other Buddhist schools, incantations of sutras and invocation of dhāranī have been a significant...   More >

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Distributive politics for an urbanizing continent: A view from Ghana

Colloquium | February 20 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Jeffrey Paller, Assistant Professor, University of San Francisco Department of Politics

 Center for African Studies

Dominant social science approaches to distributive politics focus on elections and social characteristics. Yet these approaches often overlook the historical evolution of local contexts, as well as how certain residents and groups make meaning of specific goods and resources. This is particularly important in cities where land is scarce while property values rise, enabling politicians and leaders...   More >

From Turks to Mongols: David Ayalon’s Vision of the Eurasian Steppe in Islamic History

Lecture | February 20 | 4 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Reuven Amitai, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Center for Middle Eastern Studies

This lecture seeks to survey and critically engage some of the ideas of David Ayalon (1914-98), and then to see where they might further be developed and applied. Although Ayalon is primarily known as a Mamlukist, and in fact can be called the father of Mamluk studies, he also turned his attention to other weighty matters in the study of Middle Eastern and Islamic history. Among these was the...   More >

Thursday, February 22, 2018

An Evening of Korean Poetry

Conference/Symposium | February 22 | 4-7 p.m. |  Berkeley City Club

 2315 Durant Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Sae-young Oh, poet

 Jae Moo Lee, poet; Keutbyul Jeong, Ewha Womans University; David McCann, Harvard University

 Youngmin Kwon, UC Berkeley

 Center for Korean Studies (CKS), Literature Translation Institute of Korea

Please join us for an evening of Korean poetry with Oh Sae-young, Lee Jae Moo, and Jeong Keutbyul. Also joining us will be Professors David McCann (Harvard University) and Youngmin Kwon (UC Berkeley).

From chan to Chan: Meditation and the semiotics of visionary experience in medieval Chinese Buddhism

Lecture | February 22 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Eric Greene, Yale University

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

In this talk Eric Greene argues that a distinguishing feature of “early Chan” discourse relative to mainstream Chinese approaches to “Buddhist meditation” (chan)was the rejection of the semiotic potential of visionary meditative experiences. Drawing from early Chan texts, contemporaneous non-Chan meditation manuals, and recently discovered stone inscriptions from Sichuan, he suggests that one way...   More >

Friday, February 23, 2018

Labor Relations in Southeast Asian Fisheries

Panel Discussion | February 23 | 12-2 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Peter Vandergeest, Professor of Geography, York University; Melissa Marschke, Associate Professor of International Development and Global Studies, University of Ottawa

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

MENA Salon

Workshop | February 23 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Every Friday in the semester, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies hosts an informal weekly coffee hour and guided discussion of current events in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), open to all and free of charge. Check the calendar the Monday before the Salon for the current week's topic.

Monday, February 26, 2018

Social Change in Post-Khomeini Iran: What to Expect in the Coming Years?

Lecture | February 26 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Mahmood Monshipouri, San Francisco State University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The post-Khomeini era has profoundly changed the socio-political landscape of Iran. Since 1989, the internal dynamics of change in Iran, rooted in a panoply of socioeconomic, cultural, institutional, demographic, and behavioral factors, have led to a noticeable transition in both societal and governmental structures of power, as well as the way in which many Iranians have come to deal with the...   More >

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Measure for the Anthropocene: Planetary Imagination and Design

Lecture | February 27 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Neyran Turan, College of Environmental Design

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

In light of our current political crisis around climate change, what can architecture and design contribute toward a new planetary imaginary of our contemporary environment? If climate change is a crisis of imagination, as literary historian Amitav Ghosh states, or a profound mutation in our relation to the world, as put by Bruno Latour, can design imagination provide any insights in this dilemma...   More >

Fanon in the Algerian War: A Painful Gender Issue

Lecture | February 27 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Seloua Luste-Boulbina

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Department of French

The colony operates with a double standard. Women are both largely excluded from schooling and supposed to be protected by their male fellow citizens. Everything then happens as if, according to the old despotic saying, colonial politics were benevolent toward them: they must be protected from their own. But how? And in what sense? To answer this, Seloua Luste-Boulbina examines the conditions...   More >

Friday, March 2, 2018

Workshop on Tannishō Commentarial Materials

Conference/Symposium | March 2 – 4, 2018 every day |  Jodo Shinshu Center

 2140 Durant Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Center for Buddhist Studies, Otani University, Ryukoku University

The Centers for Japanese Studies and Buddhist Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, together with Ōtani University and Ryūkoku University in Kyoto announce a workshop under the supervision of Mark Blum that will focus on critically examining premodern and modern hermeneutics of the Tannishō, a core text of the Shin sect of Buddhism, and arguably the most well-read...   More >

The Killing Season

Lecture | March 2 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Geoffrey Robinson, Professor of History, UCLA

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

Prof. Robinson will discuss his new book The Killing Season:
A History of the Indonesian Massacres, 1965-66
(Princeton University Press, 2018)

Geoff Robinson

Saturday, March 3, 2018

Workshop on Tannishō Commentarial Materials

Conference/Symposium | March 2 – 4, 2018 every day |  Jodo Shinshu Center

 2140 Durant Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Center for Buddhist Studies, Otani University, Ryukoku University

The Centers for Japanese Studies and Buddhist Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, together with Ōtani University and Ryūkoku University in Kyoto announce a workshop under the supervision of Mark Blum that will focus on critically examining premodern and modern hermeneutics of the Tannishō, a core text of the Shin sect of Buddhism, and arguably the most well-read...   More >

Sunday, March 4, 2018

Workshop on Tannishō Commentarial Materials

Conference/Symposium | March 2 – 4, 2018 every day |  Jodo Shinshu Center

 2140 Durant Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Center for Buddhist Studies, Otani University, Ryukoku University

The Centers for Japanese Studies and Buddhist Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, together with Ōtani University and Ryūkoku University in Kyoto announce a workshop under the supervision of Mark Blum that will focus on critically examining premodern and modern hermeneutics of the Tannishō, a core text of the Shin sect of Buddhism, and arguably the most well-read...   More >

Monday, March 5, 2018

Unhappy in its Own Way: Revising the English Family Novel on Russian Soil

Colloquium | March 5 | 4-5:30 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Anna Berman, Assistant Professor, Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, McGill University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Department of Comparative Literature

This is the second lecture of the Spring 2018 Slavic Graduate Colloquium lecture series.

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

Storm Clouds Over The Western Pacific: Challenges To American Strategy In East Asia

Lecture | March 6 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Admiral Dennis Blair

 Institute of International Studies

Admiral Dennis Blair currently serves as a director and advisors to National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR), Sasakawa Peace Foundation, the Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property, the Energy Security Leadership Council of Securing America’s Future Energy, and Freedom House. Admiral Blair has also served on the Institute for Defense Analyses, a federally funded research and...   More >

Friday, March 9, 2018

Diverting Water, Diverting the Nation: Water Infrastructure Controversies and the Oyu Tolgoi Copper-Gold Mine in South Gobi Province, Mongolia

Lecture | March 9 | 12 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Franck Bille, Program Director, Tang Center for Silk Road Studies

 Sara L. Jackson, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Metropolitan State University of Denver

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative

The Oyu Tolgoi copper-gold mine has become a symbol of the promise of mining to revive Mongolia’s struggling economy and to propel the nation into a new era of prosperity. Water resources are vital to the operation of Oyu Tolgoi, which is expected to be in operation for at least thirty years. However, local residents, particularly nomadic herders, have raised concerns about the redirection of...   More >

MENA Salon

Workshop | March 9 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Every Friday in the semester, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies hosts an informal weekly coffee hour and guided discussion of current events in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), open to all and free of charge. Check the calendar the Monday before the Salon for the current week's topic.

An Intellectual History of Literati Localism, 1100-1500

Colloquium | March 9 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Peter Bol, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

 Nicolas Tackett, History, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Literati communities took form at the local level in the twelfth century and developed various forms of voluntary activism in areas that had once been the province of the state and religious institutions. Some Neo-Confucians encouraged this voluntarism, but generally literati continued to see themselves as members of a national elite even if they lived their lives locally. This case study of...   More >

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Ethnographic films by Director-cinematographer Xiangchen Liu

Colloquium | March 14 | 4-6 p.m. |  1995 University Avenue, fifth floor

 Map

 Xiangchen Liu, independent filmmaker

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS), Mongolian Initiative

Zul (documentary, 57 minutes)
The Mongolians in Bayanbulug Area, believers of Tibetan Buddhism, make a lengthy journey through ridges and passes to reach their winter pasture deep inside Mount Tianshan. There, while being isolated for 5 months by storm and snow, people celebrate Zul, the Lamp Lighting Festival on the 25th of October on the lunar calendar each year. On this Day of Death of...   More >

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Protesting Precarity in South Korea: Space, Infrastructure, and the Politics of the Body

Colloquium | March 15 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Jennifer Jihye Chun, University of Toronto

 John Lie, UC Berkeley

 Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

This talk draws upon field research conducted over the past decade to examine how and how under what conditions public cultures of protest flourish among South Korean workers in their struggles against ongoing employment precaritization and the intensification of capitalist inequality.

Friday, March 16, 2018

Sunflowers and Umbrellas: Social Movements, Expressive Practices, and Political Culture in Taiwan and Hong Kong

Conference/Symposium | March 16 | 9 a.m.-7:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Focusing on two important student-led protest movements that took place in 2014 in in Taiwan and Hong Kong, nicknamed “Sunflowers and Umbrellas" respectively, this symposium, together with screening and discussion of the film "Yellowing," will attempt to bring new angles to the comparison between Taiwan and Hong Kong...   More >

MENA Salon

Workshop | March 16 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Every Friday in the semester, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies hosts an informal weekly coffee hour and guided discussion of current events in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), open to all and free of charge. Check the calendar the Monday before the Salon for the current week's topic.

Monday, March 19, 2018

Politics of Religion in Post-Coup Turkey

Lecture | March 19 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Yunus Doğan Telliel, City University of New York

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

While there remain many unanswered questions regarding the July 2016 coup attempt, most Turkish citizens seem to agree with the government that putschists were linked to Fethullah Gülen and the Hizmet movement. Although the government was decisive about what some call ‘de-Gülenification’ in state and private sectors, the possibility of a coup organized by a group of devout Muslims has puzzled...   More >

World Literature as Travelling Genre: Paris, St. Petersburg, Tiflis

Colloquium | March 19 | 4-5:30 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Harsha Ram, Associate Professor, Slavic Languages and Literatures, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

This is the third lecture of the Spring 2018 Slavic Graduate Colloquium lecture series.

Friday, March 23, 2018

MENA Salon

Workshop | March 23 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Every Friday in the semester, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies hosts an informal weekly coffee hour and guided discussion of current events in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), open to all and free of charge. Check the calendar the Monday before the Salon for the current week's topic.

Tuesday, April 3, 2018

MENA Lit Chat: The Last Watchman of Old Cairo

Special Event | April 3 | 5:30-7 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Michael David Lukas, Center for Middle Eastern Studies

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Join bestselling author and CMES Program Coordinator Michael David Lukas for a conversation about his new novel, The Last Watchman of Old Cairo, "a beautiful, richly textured novel" centered around a thousand-year old synagogue in Cairo.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Islamic Text Circle: Muhammad in the Qur'an

Workshop | April 4 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Asad Ahmed, Department of Near Eastern Studies

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

he Islamic Texts Circle introduces the broader CMES community to important themes in the Islamic tradition via its holy scripture, the Qur’an, and via its long history of exegesis. Participants will gain exposure to the rich and variegated interpretive angles developed in the fourteen-hundred years of Islamic history, so that they may discuss relevant themes in the form of a productive dialogue....   More >

 

  RSVP by calling 5106428208, or by emailing cmes@berkeley.edu

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Lecture by Dr. Arthur Dudney: Title TBD

Lecture | April 5 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Arthur Dudney, Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Cambridge University

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by Dr Arthur Dudney, scholar of the history of early modern Persian literary education and lexicography in India.

Friday, April 6, 2018

MENA Salon

Workshop | April 6 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Every Friday in the semester, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies hosts an informal weekly coffee hour and guided discussion of current events in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), open to all and free of charge. Check the calendar the Monday before the Salon for the current week's topic.

Monday, April 9, 2018

Disaster Management in East Asia

Conference/Symposium | April 9 | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS), BASC, UC San Diego Medical School

East Asian countries frequently face earthquakes, tsunamis, tropical storms, flooding, and landslides, leading to the proliferation of actors in the disaster management sphere. Indeed, the private sector, military, non-governmental and governmental organizations, and national and regional bureaucracies are involved in providing different services across phases of disaster management...   More >

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Reimagining Morocco's Cultural Heritage for the 21st Century

Lecture | April 10 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Ashley Miller, Visiting Scholar, Center for Middle Eastern Studies

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

In July of 2011, King Mohammed VI of Morocco (r.1999-present) endorsed a constitutional referendum that acknowledged his country’s plural identities and histories in an unprecedented way, describing a Moroccan national identity “forged through the convergence of its Arab-Islamic, Amazigh, and Saharan-Hassanic components, nourished and enriched by its African, Andalusian, Hebraic, and...   More >

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Europe. America. Trump.

Lecture | April 11 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 John Peterson, University of Edinburgh

 Institute of European Studies, Institute of Governmental Studies

The election of Donald Trump in 2016 sent shock waves across political classes globally and prompted debates about whether his ‘America first’ agenda threatened the liberal international order generally and the transatlantic alliance specifically. During his first year in office, Trump seemed determined to undermine the hallmarks of the international order: democracy, liberal economics and...   More >

Friday, April 13, 2018

Rethinking Labor: Work and Livelihood in Japan

Conference/Symposium | April 13 |  UC Berkeley Campus

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS)

The UC Berkeley Center for Japanese Studies presents its fifth annual graduate student conference: Rethinking Labor: Work and Livelihood in Japan. The conference will explore how historically situated configurations of “work,” “labor,” and “livelihood” operate in Japan ranging from the household to the transnational.

Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities

Conference/Symposium | April 13 | 1-6 p.m. |  1995 University Avenue, fifth floor

 Map

 Ching Kwan Lee, Sociology, UCLA

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS), Center for East Asian Studies, Stanford University

Conference continues on Saturday at 10 am.

Initiated in 2010, the annual Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities brings together current graduate students from across the U.S. and around the world to present innovative research on any aspect of modern Chinese cultural production in the humanistic disciplines.

MENA Salon

Workshop | April 13 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Every Friday in the semester, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies hosts an informal weekly coffee hour and guided discussion of current events in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), open to all and free of charge. Check the calendar the Monday before the Salon for the current week's topic.

Saturday, April 14, 2018

Rethinking Labor: Work and Livelihood in Japan

Conference/Symposium | April 14 |  UC Berkeley Campus

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS)

The UC Berkeley Center for Japanese Studies presents its fifth annual graduate student conference: Rethinking Labor: Work and Livelihood in Japan. The conference will explore how historically situated configurations of “work,” “labor,” and “livelihood” operate in Japan ranging from the household to the transnational.

Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities

Conference/Symposium | April 14 | 10 a.m.-5 p.m. |  1995 University Avenue, fifth floor

 Map

 Xiao Liu, East Asian Studies, McGill University

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS), Center for East Asian Studies, Stanford University

Conference begins on Friday at 1 pm.

Initiated in 2010, the annual Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities brings together current graduate students from across the U.S. and around the world to present innovative research on any aspect of modern Chinese cultural production in the humanistic disciplines.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

The Question of Judeo-Arabic: Nation, Partition, and the Linguistic Imaginary: CMES Distinguished Visitor Lecture

Lecture | April 19 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Ella Shohat, New York University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Professor Ella Shohat, 2018 CMES Distinguished Visitor, teaches at the departments of Art & Public Policy and Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies at New York University. She has lectured and written extensively on issues having to do with post/colonial and transnational approaches to Cultural studies. Her writing has been translated into diverse languages, including: French, Hebrew, Arabic,...   More >

Friday, April 20, 2018

MENA Salon

Workshop | April 20 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Every Friday in the semester, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies hosts an informal weekly coffee hour and guided discussion of current events in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), open to all and free of charge. Check the calendar the Monday before the Salon for the current week's topic.

The Origins of the Chinese Nation: Song China and the Forging of an East Asian World Order

Colloquium | April 20 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Nicolas Tackett, History, UC Berkeley

 Pheng Cheah, Rhetoric, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

In his new book, Tackett proposes that the Northern Song Dynasty (960–1127) witnessed both the maturation of an East Asian inter-state system and the emergence of a new worldview and sense of Chinese identity among educated elites. These developments together had sweeping repercussions for the course of Chinese history, while also demonstrating that there has existed in world history a viable...   More >

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Book Talk: Figuring Korean Futures: Children’s Literature in Modern Korea

Colloquium | April 26 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Dafna Zur, Stanford University

 Steven Lee, UC Berkeley

 Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

Figuring Korean Futures is the story of the emergence and development of writing for children in modern Korea. This privileged location enabled writers and illustrators, educators and psychologists, intellectual elite and laypersons to envision the child as a powerful antidote to the present and as an uplifting metaphor of colonial Korea's future.

Friday, April 27, 2018

Migrations and New Mobilities in Southeast Asia

Conference/Symposium | April 27 – 28, 2018 every day | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

The aim of this conference, jointly sponsored by the Center for Southeast Asia Studies at UC Berkeley and the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at UCLA, is to look anew at issues concerning migration and Southeast Asia. Keynote speaker: Anis Hidayah, Migrant Care (Indonesia)

MENA Salon

Workshop | April 27 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Every Friday in the semester, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies hosts an informal weekly coffee hour and guided discussion of current events in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), open to all and free of charge. Check the calendar the Monday before the Salon for the current week's topic.

2018 Near Eastern Studies Graduate Student Conference: Hard Times: Critical Approaches to Crisis and its Aftermath

Conference/Symposium | April 27 | 5-7 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 miriam cooke, Duke University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

April 27, 5 p.m.: Keynote Speaker miriam cooke

April 28, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.: Graduate Student Panels

Saturday, April 28, 2018

Migrations and New Mobilities in Southeast Asia

Conference/Symposium | April 27 – 28, 2018 every day | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

The aim of this conference, jointly sponsored by the Center for Southeast Asia Studies at UC Berkeley and the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at UCLA, is to look anew at issues concerning migration and Southeast Asia. Keynote speaker: Anis Hidayah, Migrant Care (Indonesia)

Monday, April 30, 2018

Soundtrack of the Revolution: The Politics of Music in Iran

Lecture | April 30 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Nahid Siamdoust, Yale University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Music is an alternative and revealing way for studying post-revolutionary Iranian society and politics. In this book talk, Nahid Siamdoust discusses music as a potent cultural register that facilitates political expression and communication, while tracing the evolution of cultural and social policy making in Iran. Drawing on over five years of research in Iran, including the 2009 protests, she...   More >

Thursday, May 3, 2018

Anne Monius | Rāma and Sītā in a Śaiva Literary Key?: Rethinking the Literary and Religious Orientation of Kampaṉ’s Irāmāvatāram

Lecture | May 3 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Anne E. Monius, Professor of South Asian Religions at Harvard Divinity School

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by Anne E. Monius, Professor of South Asian Religions at Harvard Divinity School.

Friday, May 4, 2018

Maritime Asia

Conference/Symposium | May 4 | 2-5 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

The Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley, in collaboration with the Centre for Rising Powers at the University of Cambridge is convening a workshop on “Maritime Asia” with a focus on “the Securitization of the China Seas in the 19th and 20th Centuries.” As China emerges to become a major Asian maritime power in the 21st century, scholars examine...   More >

MENA Salon

Workshop | May 4 | 3-4 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Every Friday in the semester, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies hosts an informal weekly coffee hour and guided discussion of current events in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), open to all and free of charge. Check the calendar the Monday before the Salon for the current week's topic.

Exhibits and Ongoing Events

Couture Korea

Exhibit - Multimedia | November 3, 2017 – February 4, 2018 every day | Asian Art Museum, First Floor Special Exhibition Gallery

 200 Larkin St, San Francisco, CA 94102

 Asian Art Museum

Discover the past, present and future of Korea in this first U.S. exhibition to consider Korean fashion as an expression of social and cultural values.