Skip to main content.
Advanced search >
Print

Upcoming Events

Monday, February 27, 2017

Benjamin Backus, PhD

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | February 27 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Benjamin Backus, ​State University of New York ​

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


TBD



Two-photon Imaging and Manipulation of Cortical Neural Circuits in vivo

Seminar | February 27 | 4-5 p.m. | Soda Hall, HP Auditorium (306)


Weijian Yang, Postdoctoral Research Scientist, Columbia University

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)


One challenge of understanding how the brain works is the complexity of neural circuits. Optical methods provide a route to record and manipulate the neural activity of a small subset of neuron cells with cellular resolution. In this talk, I will discuss our approach to tackling the above challenges through novel three-dimensional (3D) imaging and optical manipulation methods.



Two-photon Imaging and Manipulation of Cortical Neural Circuits in vivo

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | February 27 | 4-5 p.m. | 306 Soda Hall


Weijian Yang, Columbia University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


One challenge of understanding how the brain works is the complexity of neural circuits. These circuits are composed of hundreds of thousands of neurons that are interconnected in a highly distributed fashion. Optical methods provide a route to record and manipulate the neural activity of a small subset of these cells with cellular resolution. The desire to access a larger volume with higher...   More >

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Real-Time and Adaptive Auditory Neural Processing

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | March 1 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Sahar Akram, Starkey Hearing Research Center

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Decoding the dynamics of brain activity underlying conscious behavior is one of the key questions in systems neuroscience. Sensory neurons, such as those in the auditory system, can undergo rapid and task-dependent changes in their response characteristics during attentive behavior, and thereby result in functional changes in the system over time. In order to quantify human’s conscious...   More >



Thursday, March 2, 2017

Learning-based and behavioural evidence for probabilistic perception in the cortex

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | March 2 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Jozsef Fiser, Central European University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


560 Evans
The notion of interpreting cortical operations as probabilistic computation has been steadily gaining ground in neuroscience, and with the emergence of the PPC-based and sampling-based frameworks, now there exist clear theoretical alternatives of how such computation might happen in the brain. Nevertheless, a number of crucial issues necessary to make these frameworks biologically...   More >



Friday, March 3, 2017

Cognition Colloquium: Metareasoning and mental simulation.

Colloquium | March 3 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Jessica Hamrick, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Our own Jessica Hamrick will present her exit talk, "Metareasoning and mental simulation."

Saturday, March 4, 2017

Contextualizing and Confronting the Effects of Complex Trauma on Youth Development:: Understanding Youth Trauma and Cultivating Resilience

Conference/Symposium | March 4 | 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. | Gym First Presbyterian Church


2407 Dana St, Berkeley, CA 94704

Dr. Jeff Duncan-Andrade, Associate Professor of Raza Studies and Education, San Francisco State University

Dr. Daniela Kaufer, Professor of Integrative Biology, UC Berkeley; Dr. Darlene Francis, Professor of Public Health and Neuroscience, UC Berkeley

Critical Trauma Working Group


This 1-day free conference is focused on understanding and addressing childhood trauma through a critical lens. It is geared to students, researchers, community practitioners, and community members, including youth.


$0

Registration opens January 30. Register by March 1 online.

Monday, March 6, 2017

Graduate Student Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | March 6 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Rachel Albert, O’Brein Lab; Paul Cullen, Flanagan Lab

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills



Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Friday, March 10, 2017

The nature of visual working memory: objects, scenes, and the role of semantic knowledge

Seminar: ICBS Seminar | March 10 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Tim Brady, University of California, San Diego

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


In this talk, I’ll suggest a rethinking of the nature of visual working memory: first, I’ll argue that we have a separate object working memory and scene working memory system, which show themselves in a wide variety of tasks (ranging from developmental psychology to cognitive neuroscience) and each contribute to nearly all working memory tasks. Second, I’ll argue that working memory, like...   More >

Monday, March 13, 2017

Graduate Student Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | March 13 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Sahar Yousef, Silver Lab; Nevin El Nimri, Wildsoet Lab

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills



The role of auditory feedback in speech production: Berkeley Ear Club

Colloquium | March 13 | 4 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Beach Room 3105


John Houde, Speech & Nuroscience Lab Otolaryngology UC San Francisco

Department of Psychology

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Marian Diamond Day

Film - Documentary: Neuroscience Seminar | March 14 | 7-9 p.m. |  OLD CITY HALL


2134 Martin Luther King Jr. WAY, Berkeley, CA 94720

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


In conjunction with the PBS broadcast of MY LOVE AFFAIR WITH THE BRAIN; THE LIFE AND SCIENCE OF DR. MARIAN DIAMOND, the City of Berkeley is honoring Marian with:

Marian Diamond Day proclaimed in Berkeley on March 14, 2017 7pm OLD CITY HALL AT 2134 Martin Luther King Jr. WAY

Friday, March 17, 2017

Cognition Colloquium: Uncovering visual priors in spatial memory using serial reproduction

Colloquium | March 17 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Thomas Langlois

Department of Psychology


Our own Thomas Langlois will present his work on, "Uncovering visual priors in spatial memory using serial reproduction."

Monday, March 20, 2017

Graduate Student Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | March 20 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Mayur Mudigonda, Malik Lab; Patrick Carney, Wildsoet Lab

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Neuroscience Student Seminar Series

Seminar | March 23 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


CANCELED - Kia Nobre, University of Oxford

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Friday, March 24, 2017

Formats for thinking

Seminar: ICBS Seminar | March 24 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Elisabeth Camp, Rutgers University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Many philosophers, logicians and psychologists assume an exhaustive and exclusive dichotomy between "imagistic", iconic, or pictorial representations and "discursive", logical, or propositional ones. Others dismiss the distinction as meaningless, on the ground that any content can be captured in propositional terms. Adherents of both positions often conclude that thought -- at least, cognition of...   More >

Thursday, April 6, 2017

Neuroscience Student Seminar Series

Seminar | April 6 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


CANCELED - Danielle Bassett, University of Pennsylvania

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Friday, April 7, 2017

Counterfactual thinking and comparative similarity

Seminar: ICBS Seminar | April 7 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Felipe de Brigard, Duke University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Counterfactual thinking involves imagining hypothetical alternatives to reality. Philosopher David Lewis argued that people estimate the subjective plausibility that a counterfactual event could have occurred by comparing an imagined possible world in which the counterfactual statement is true against the current, actual world in which the counterfactual statement is false. Accordingly,...   More >

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Monday, April 17, 2017

Hidden Hearing Loss: Synaptopathy in noise-induced and age related cochlear damage: Berkeley Ear Club

Colloquium | April 17 | 4 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Beach Room 3105


Charles Liberman, Mass Eye & Ear Eaton Peabody Lab Boston

Department of Psychology

Friday, April 21, 2017

Objectivity and Trained Judgment: Toward an ethnography of experimental psychology

Seminar: ICBS Seminar | April 21 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Emily Martin, New York University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Historians of psychology have described how the "introspection" of early Wundtian psychology largely came to be ruled out of experimental psychology settings by the mid-20th century. In this talk I will take a fresh look at the years before this process was complete -- from the vantage point of early ethnographic and psychological field expeditions and from observing several current psychology...   More >

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Division of Neurobiology and H. Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | April 27 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Elizabeth Buffalo, University of Washington

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Friday, April 28, 2017

Cognition Colloquium: Tracking early vocabulary development with smartphones

Colloquium | April 28 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Stephan Meylan, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Our own Stephan Meylan will present his work on, "Tracking early vocabulary development with smartphones."

Thursday, May 4, 2017

Division of Neurobiology and H. Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | May 4 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Karen Zito, University of California, Davis

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Monday, May 8, 2017

Monday, May 15, 2017

​Behavioural Signatures of Ganglion Cell Dysfunction in Glaucoma

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | May 15 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


​Andrew John Anderson, University of Melbourne

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


It is well established that retinal ganglion cells die in glaucoma. What is less clear is whether glaucoma induces a protracted period of dysfunction prior to cell death. This talk will review the strengths and limitations of some of the behavioural evidence that has been used to argue for the presence of dysfunctional retinal ganglion cells in glaucoma. Establishing that such dysfunction exists...   More >

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

The Role of Astrocytes in Neurovascular Coupling at the Capillary and Arteriole Level in the Retina and Brain

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | May 23 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Anusha Mishra, University College London, UK

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Neuronal activity evokes a spatially and temporally localized increase in blood flow to power the information processing carried out by the neurons, a phenomenon that underlies BOLD fMRI signals. This neurovascular coupling occurs both in the brain and the retina.

In the retina, both light- and glial-stimulation evoke pronounced arteriole dilations (30.8±3.7% and 23.5±4.1%, respectively). This...   More >