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Upcoming Events

Monday, February 25, 2019

Oxyopia

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | February 25 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Dylan Paiton, Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute; Elise Harb, UC Berkeley School of Optometry

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


OXYOPIA is a seminar series featuring lectures on basic, clinical, and applied research in vision. Unless otherwise noted, these lectures take place on Mondays 11:10 am to 12:30 pm in 489 Minor Hall. The lectures are free and open to the public.



What do language disorders reveal about the brain? From classic models to network approaches

Colloquium | February 25 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West


Nina Dronkers, Psychology

Department of Psychology


Past approaches to the study of language and the brain have focused largely on the contributions of Broca's and Wernicke's areas. By using advanced neuroimaging techniques with individuals who have aphasia, we have now learned that language is an extraordinarily complex system that requires an extensive and interactive network of brain regions to sustain it. We have also learned that an intricate...   More >

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

ICBS Seminar

Seminar: ICBS Seminar | February 27 | 11 a.m.-1 p.m. | 1102 Berkeley Way West


Zach Pardos, Graduate School of Education and School of Information; Stella Yu, Berkeley Institute for Data Science, EECS

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


The Mind in Big Data, Zach Pardos

Learning with Minimal Human Supervision, Stella Yu

Monday, March 11, 2019

Aging, Memory and Alzheimer’s disease

Colloquium | March 11 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West


William Jagust, Psychology

Department of Psychology


It has long been known that older individuals often experience decline in their episodic memory abilities. Within the past decade, new approaches have revealed the frequent presence of the aggregated proteins beta-amyloid and tau in the brains of cognitively normal older people. These proteins are also associated with Alzheimer’s disease. By imaging these proteins in normal older people, and...   More >

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

ICBS Seminar

Seminar: ICBS Seminar | March 13 | 11 a.m.-1 p.m. | 1217 Berkeley Way West


Steve Piantadosi, Dept of Psychology; Terry Deacon, Dept of Anthropology

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Number learning in the Bolivian Amazon, Steve Piantadosi

Patterns of early embryonic brain development in mammals, Terry Deacon

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Biology as information dynamics

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | March 20 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


John Baez, UC Berkeley

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


If biology is the study of self-replicating entities, and we want to understand the role of information, it makes sense to see how information theory is connected to the ‘replicator equation’ — a simple model of population dynamics for self-replicating entities. The relevant concept of information turns out to be the information of one probability distribution relative to another, also known as...   More >

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Friday, March 22, 2019

ICBS Special Event: The Neural Basis of Attention

Seminar: ICBS Seminar | March 22 | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | 1102 Berkeley Way West


Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Festschrift in Honor of Bob Rafal

Full schedule will be provided in future.



Neuroscience Student Seminar Series

Seminar | March 22 | 12-1 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center | Note change in date and time


Earl Miller, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology



Working Memory 2.0

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | March 22 | 12-1 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Earl K. Miller, Picower Professor of Neuroscience, MIT

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Working memory is the fundamental function by which we break free from reflexive input-output reactions to gain control over our own thoughts. It has two types of mechanisms: online maintenance of information and its volitional or executive control. Classic models proposed persistent spiking for maintenance but have not explicitly addressed executive control. I will review recent theoretical and...   More >

Monday, April 8, 2019

Division of Neurobiology and H. Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | April 8 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Indira Raman, Northwestern University

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH



Friday, April 12, 2019

3D Human Brain Models and Nanoplatforms for Prognostics and Therapeutics of Neurological Disorders: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | April 12 | 2-3 p.m. | 4 LeConte Hall


Prof. Hansang Cho, Univ of North Carolina, Charlotte / Biomedical Engineering

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. However, no definitive cure for AD exists due to lack of limited model systems that accurately reflect AD-related immunity in human brains, nor for a drug development strategy for delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and assessment of drug efficacy in human brains.

Here, I present micro-scaled 3D environments that...   More >

Monday, April 22, 2019

Thursday, April 25, 2019

Division of Neurobiology and H. Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | April 25 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Michael Higley, Yale University

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Thursday, May 2, 2019

Division of Neurobiology and H. Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | May 2 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Doris Tsao, Caltech

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

ICBS Seminar

Seminar: ICBS Seminar | May 8 | 11 a.m.-1 p.m. | 1217 Berkeley Way West


Anca Dragon, EECS; Emily Cooper, Vis Science

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Optimal Robot Action for and around People, Anca Dragon

3D Vision in Natural Environments, Emily Cooper