Upcoming Events

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Protecting the Dead: the LBA site of Aidonia, Greece, and the TAPHOS project

Lecture | September 19 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Kim Shelton, Associate Professor of Classics, Director of Nemea Center for Classical Archaeology, Department of Classics, UC Berkeley

 Archaeological Research Facility

I present the preliminary results of the Nemea Center's collaborative project with the Greek Archaeological Service (TAPHOS) at the LBA site of Aidonia in the Korinthia region of Greece.

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Constructing Post-Imperium Identity: Taiwan and Eastern Europe

Conference/Symposium | September 20 – 21, 2018 every day | 10 a.m.-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

Efforts in Taiwan to create a new identity and nation-state as part of the process of democratization have much in common with the making of new identities and nation-states in democratizing Eastern and Central Europe, especially with the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia. This workshop ...   More >

Bancroft Library Roundtable: A Wise Counselor and Faithful Servant: The Life of Regent Andrew Smith Hallidie

Lecture | September 20 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Taryn Edwards, Librarian/Historian, Mechanics' Institute Library and Chess Room, San Francisco

 Bancroft Library

University of California Regent Andrew Smith Hallidie’s biographer, Taryn Edwards, will talk about his life. Considered the father of San Francisco’s cable car, Hallidie was a champion of the Bay Area's libraries and educational institutions. He was named an ex officio regent in 1868, later appointed in his own right, and served until his death in 1900.

Berkeley Seminar on Global History: Borderlands and Border Crossings in the 19th-Century World

Seminar: History Department Events | September 20 | 4-6 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall | Note change in date and location

 Samuel Truett, Associate Professor of History, University of New Mexico

 Department of History, Institute of International Studies

As a historian who approaches the U.S. West and Mexican North primarily from the perspective of their shared borderlands, Professor Truett is interested in the crossings—social, cultural, and environmental—that have connected these two regions to the rest of the Americas and the world at large. Known best for his work in borderlands history, he also works actively in western U.S. history,...   More >

Navigating Borders and Violence: Indigenous Maya Families and Central American Children in Migration: CRG Thursday Forum Series

Lecture | September 20 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender

“It is a crime to be young here”: Violence against Minors in Central America, Mexico, and the United States
Leisy J. Abrego, Department of Chicana/o Studies, UCLA

Pedagogies of Migration/Reframing What It Means to Teach and Learn
Indigenous Maya Families from Yucatán in California
Patricia Baquedano-López, Graduate School of Education, UC Berkeley

How to Write a Research Proposal Workshop

Workshop | September 20 | 4:30-5:30 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll, Haas Scholars Program Manager/Advisor, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

 Office of Undergraduate Research

If you need to write a grant proposal, this workshop is for you! You'll get a headstart on defining your research question, developing a lit review and project plan, presenting your qualifications, and creating a realistic budget.

The workshop is open to all UC Berkeley students (undergraduate, graduate, and visiting scholars) regardless of academic discipline. It will be especially useful for...   More >

Friday, September 21, 2018

Constructing Post-Imperium Identity: Taiwan and Eastern Europe

Conference/Symposium | September 20 – 21, 2018 every day | 10 a.m.-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

Efforts in Taiwan to create a new identity and nation-state as part of the process of democratization have much in common with the making of new identities and nation-states in democratizing Eastern and Central Europe, especially with the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia. This workshop ...   More >

Analyzing Our Past

Seminar | September 21 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 107 South Hall

 Zachary Bleemer, UC ClioMetric History Project

 Information, School of

Zachary Bleemer is director of the University of California ClioMetric History Project.

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

King Albert's Heroes: How four hundred young Belgians fought in Russia and conquered the United States

Lecture | September 25 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 August Thiry

 Institute of European Studies, BENELUX Studies Program, Dutch Studies, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

August Thiry, writer-lecturer at Thomas More College, Mechelen, Belgium, focuses on the worldwide adventures of the Belgian army’s first armored car unit during the Great War. This unit, known as ACM (Autos Canons Mitrailleuses - Armored Cars with Cannons and Machine Guns), was organized in Paris at the end of 1914. Trench warfare made it impossible for the ACM armored cars to be of any use on...   More >

AIA Lecture - Reports from the Field - Summer 2018

Lecture | September 25 | 5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

UC Berkeley graduate students report on their summer research and experiences at different ancient sites around the world.

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Francine Masiello: The Senses of Democracy: Perception, Politics, and Culture in Latin America

Lecture | September 26 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Masiello explores the textual and visual representation of the senses during moments of crisis in Latin America from the early nineteenth century to the present.

After Cahokia: Indigenous Repopulation and Depopulation of the Horseshoe Lake Watershed 1400 – 1900 CE

Lecture | September 26 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 AJ White, Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

 Archaeological Research Facility

This study presents demographic trends from a fecal stanol population reconstruction of Horseshoe Lake, Illinois along with information from archaeological, historical, and environmental sources to provide an interpretation of post-Cahokia (> 1400 CE) population change.

Thursday, September 27, 2018

Why Read Machiavelli's The Prince?: “Why Read…? Series”

Lecture | September 27 | 12-2 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Albert Ascoli, UC Berkeley; Julia Lupton, UC Irvine; David Marno, UC Berkeley; Nadia Urbinati, Columbia University

 Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, D.E.

Round-table and discussion

Revolutionary Blackness in the Soviet Imagination

Lecture | September 27 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Jonathan Flatley, Professor of English, Wayne State University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of English, Townsend Center for the Humanities

In the present moment, amidst a global rise of white supremacy and racism, this paper recalls a moment of state supported global anti-racism. It focuses on the work of Soviet artist Victor Koretsky, whose posters from the from the 1930s to the 1970s present black revolutionaries combating racist imperial capital around the world. My hope is that his work may stimulate our political imaginaries,...   More >

Teaching History Beyond Four-Year College

Panel Discussion: History Department Events | September 27 | 4:30-6:30 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Mike Buckley, Convent and Stuart Hall High Schools; Adrianne Francisco, Drew School; Ashley Leyba, BASIS Independent Fremont; Joseph Nejad-Duong, Fremont High School; Rachel Reinhard, UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project; Tim Rose, Berkeley City College

 Department of History, AHA Career Diversity for Historians

Six alumni of Berkeley History will discuss their career trajectories and current work in education. The panelists work in public and private middle and high schools, community colleges, and in academic adjacent roles in higher education.

The panel and Q&A will be followed by a reception with opportunities for networking.

Archaeological Perspectives on Fire and People: From Ancient Neanderthals to Contemporary California

Panel Discussion | September 27 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 Kent Lightfoot, Professor, Anthropology, UC Berkeley; Ruth Tringham, Professor Emerita, Anthropology, UC Berkeley; Linn Gassaway, Heritage Program Manager, Lassen National Forest; Tim Gill, Visiting Scholar, Archaeological Research Facility

 John Holson, Principal, Pacific Legacy, Inc.

 Archaeological Research Facility

This event brings together archaeologists from UC Berkeley’s Archaeological Research Facility and the US Forest Service in a panel discussion exploring what we might learn from humanity's long experience with fire.

An Evening with Frederick Wiseman

Lecture | September 27 | 7-9 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Frederick Wiseman

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

In this lecture illustrated with clips from his films, Frederick Wiseman will address how he chooses a documentary subject, how he tells a story, and what factors influence his aesthetic decisions. Don’t miss this rare chance to hear Wiseman speak in depth about his work and the art of filmmaking. Check back in September for more information about this event.

Friday, September 28, 2018

Socialist China’s New Exhibitions: Rethinking Class, Material Culture, and Propaganda

Colloquium: Featuring History Faculty | September 28 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Denise Y. Ho, Assistant Professor of twentieth-century Chinese History, Yale University

 Wen-hsin Yeh, Professor, Department of History, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

This talk examines the origins and Mao-era elaborations on “new exhibitions” in socialist China, the practice of displaying personal possessions as a way to articulate meanings of class in both “old China” and “new China.” During the Socialist Education Movement, “class education exhibitions” linked material objects to class status, arguing for the persistence of class and the need for...   More >

Colloquium:Delia Casadei, UC Berkeley: Contagion, Erasure, and Laughter as the Reproduction of Sound in Two 1890s Laughing Songs

Colloquium | September 28 | 4:30 p.m. | 128 Morrison Hall

 Department of Music

Jonathan Glasser is a historical anthropologist whose work focuses on modern North Africa, with particular attention to Algeria and Morocco. His first book, The Lost Paradise: Andalusi Music in Urban North Africa (University of Chicago Press, 2016) explored questions of revival and transmission in an urban performance practice in northwestern Algeria and eastern Morocco. His current project looks...   More >

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

The challenge of big data and data science for the social sciences: Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science

Lecture | October 2 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Henry Brady, Dean, Goldman School of Public Policy; Henry Brady, Dean, Goldman School of Public Policy

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

The 2005 National Science Foundation workshop report on "Cyberinfrastructure for the Social and Behavioral Sciences" (Fran Berman and Henry Brady) argued that the methods of doing research in the social sciences would be transformed by big data and data science and that the social sciences should be centrally involved in studying the impacts of big data and data science on society. In "The...   More >

Julian and His Supporters

Seminar: History Department Events | October 2 | 5-7 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Arnaldo Marcone, Professor of Roman History, Universitá Roma Tre

 Department of History, The Center for the Tebtunis Papyri

Different types of paganism were professed in the 4th century, and equally diverse were the forms taken by the support given to Julian. There were devoted pagans who fasted, practiced sacrifice and divination with great zeal, who took ritual baths and made pilgrimages to the best-known sanctuaries; who were attentive to all divine warnings, dreams, mystical signs, miraculous cures, and to all the...   More >

Illustration by Riccardo Menicanti

Environmental Change and Migration in Historical Perspective

Lecture | October 2 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Uwe Lübken, LMU Munich

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West - Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC, Gerda Henkel Foundation, Center for German and European Studies

Current debates about "climate refugees" have triggered interest in the larger connections between environmental change and migration. But what can history contribute to this new field of research? Focusing on historical case studies of environmental migration in general and displacement after natural disasters in particular, Uwe Lübken’s talk will highlight the potential of historical research...   More >

 

  RSVP online or by calling Heike Friedman at 510-643-4558, or by emailing Heike Friedman at heike@berkeley.edu by October 1.

Wednesday, October 3, 2018

How to Write a Research Proposal Workshop

Workshop | October 3 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll, Haas Scholars Program Manager/Advisor, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

 Office of Undergraduate Research

If you need to write a grant proposal, this workshop is for you! You'll get a headstart on defining your research question, developing a lit review and project plan, presenting your qualifications, and creating a realistic budget.

The workshop is open to all UC Berkeley students (undergraduate, graduate, and visiting scholars) regardless of academic discipline. It will be especially useful for...   More >

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Catherine Gallagher: Telling It Like It Wasn’t: The Counterfactual Imagination in History and Fiction

Lecture: Featuring History Faculty | October 3 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Inventing counterfactual histories—such as a Europe that never threw off Hitler, or a second term for JFK—is a common pastime of modern day historians. Gallagher probes how counterfactual history works and to what ends.

Vasari's Words: Douglas Biow and Henrike Lange in conversation

Presentation: History Department Events | October 3 | 5:30-7 p.m. | 220 Stephens Hall

 Douglas Biow, Superior Oil Company-Linward Shivers Centennial Professor in Medieval and Renaissance Studies, UT Austin; Henrike Christiane Lange, Assistant Professor, Italian Studies and History of Art, UC Berkeley

 Institute of European Studies, Department of Italian Studies, Department of History, Department of History of Art, D.E. in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies

In conversation with Professor Henrike Lange (UC Berkeley, Italian Studies / History of Art), Professor Douglas Biow (UT Austin) will present his new book Vasari's Words: The 'Lives of the Artists' as a History of Ideas in the Italian Renaissance (forthcoming September 2018 from Cambridge University Press). In this new study of Giorgio Vasari's seminal text, Biow connects five key words to the...   More >

Thursday, October 4, 2018

The Influence of the Republican Period on the Painting of Ming China

Colloquium | October 4 | 4-6 p.m. | Heyns Faculty Club

 Craig Clunas, FBA, Professor of the History of Art, University of Oxford

 Patricia Berger, Professor Emerita, Chinese Art, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

The creation of a modern Chinese art in the first half of the twentieth century necessarily required the creation of its opposite - ‘traditional Chinese art’, that which by definition was not modern. The materials out of which traditional Chinese art, and in particular ‘traditional Chinese painting’ were constructed were many and various, including the actual art of the past, and the copious...   More >

© Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford

Late Antiquity, Then and Now

Lecture: History Department Events | October 4 | 4-6 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Arnaldo Marcone, Professor of Roman History, Universitá Roma Tre

 Department of History, The Center for the Tebtunis Papyri

No one doubts the convenience and indeed necessity of historical periodizations. Nor the validity and usefulness of well-established categories: (Late) Antiquity, the early Middle Ages, Byzantium/East Rome, Sasanid Iran, early Islam.

We can be sure that, when Alois Riegl invented Late Antiquity in his "Spätrömische Kunstindustrie" (1901), his famous study of late Roman art, he could never have...   More >

Bringing the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America

Colloquium: History Department Events | October 4 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues), Wildavsky Conference Room

 Kathleen Belew, Assistant Professor, Kathleen Belew, Assistant Professor of History and the College, University of Chicago

 Center for Right-Wing Studies, Department of Sociology, Department of History

The white power movement in America wants a revolution. It has declared all-out war against the federal government and its agents, and has carried out—with military precision—an escalating campaign of terror against the American public. Its soldiers are not lone wolves but are highly organized cadres motivated by a coherent and deeply troubling worldview of white supremacy, anticommunism, and...   More >

Friday, October 5, 2018

Mexico 1968

Lecture | October 5 | 12-2 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Susana Draper, Princeton University; Bruno Bosteels, Columbia University

 Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Mexico: Radical Politics and/or Rule of Law

Susana Draper, Princeton University, “Emancipation of Memory: Experiments on Freedom and Democracy”
Bruno Bosteels, Columbia University, “"State, Strike, Insurrection"

Colloquium:Andrew Hicks Cornell University: Listening Otherwise in and to Classical Persian Poetry

Colloquium | October 5 | 4:30 p.m. | 128 Morrison Hall

 Department of Music

Andrew Hicks’ research focuses on the intellectual history of early musical thought from a cross-disciplinary perspective that embraces philosophical, cosmological, scientific and grammatical discourse in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, and spans the linguistic and cultural spheres of Latin, Greek, Persian, and Arabic. His first book, Composing the World: Harmony in the Medieval Platonic...   More >

Monday, October 8, 2018

AHMA Colloquium - Discovery and Digital Curation of Textual Archives

Lecture | October 8 | 4-5 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Adam Anderson, UC Berkeley

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

This is the second paper in a lecture series entitled "Digital Humanities and the Ancient World." The event is co-sponsored by the AHMA Colloquium and the Townsend Center for the Humanities.

Abstract: I introduce the Ur III (250,000 tot.; Drehem 15,000) and Old Assyrian (23,000 tot.; 10,000 published) texts as examples of large bodies of cuneiform tablets that were...   More >

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Performing Germanness: Laughter and Violence in Nazi Germany

Lecture | October 9 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Martina Kessel, Bielefeld University

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West - Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC, Center for German and European Studies, Gerda Henkel Stiftung

Martina Kessel looks at the meaning and role of humor as an identity practice in Germany during the time of National Socialism in Germany. One theory that she will explore in her lecture is that non-Jewish Germans disguised violence as 'art' to justify their failure to comply with international or humanitarian beliefs.

Martina Kessel is a Historian of Modern Germany at Bielefeld University,...   More >

  RSVP online

Saturday, October 13, 2018

An American History of Race, Gender, and Hair

Lecture: Featuring History Faculty | October 13 | 12-1 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maude Fife Room, Third Floor

 Sarah Gold McBride, Visiting Lecturer, Department of History, UC Berkeley

 Department of History, Cal Alumni Association

How did something as ordinary as hair affect major U.S. institutions like slavery and the women’s rights movement? In the 19th century, American people from different regions, class backgrounds, racial groups, and religious traditions shared the belief that hair exposed the truth about the person from whose body it grew.

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

What is in a Category? Telling Political Refugees and Economic Migrants Apart

Lecture | October 17 | 11 a.m.-2 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Jutta Allmendinger, WZB Berlin Social Science Center

 David Miliband, International Rescue Committee

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West - Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC, ZEIT-Stiftung Ebelin und Gerd Bucerius, International Rescue Committee, Thomas Mann House Los Angeles

Please join us for our Annual Bucerius Lecture with David Miliband, President and CEO of the International Rescue Committee, followed by a conversation with Jutta Allmendinger, President of the WZB Berlin Social Science Center.

Unlike Europe, where there are two separate migration issues that are coming together in a complicated way, the US conversation on migration has until recently been...   More >

 

  RSVP online by October 14.

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Bryan Wagner: The Tar Baby: A Global History

Lecture | October 17 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Wagner offers a fresh analysis of this deceptively simple story of a fox, a rabbit, and a doll made of tar and turpentine, tracing its history and connections to slavery, colonialism, and global trade.

Thursday, October 18, 2018

How to Write a Research Proposal Workshop

Workshop | October 18 | 3-4 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll, Haas Scholars Program Manager/Advisor, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

 Office of Undergraduate Research

If you need to write a grant proposal, this workshop is for you! You'll get a headstart on defining your research question, developing a lit review and project plan, presenting your qualifications, and creating a realistic budget.

The workshop is open to all UC Berkeley students (undergraduate, graduate, and visiting scholars) regardless of academic discipline. It will be especially useful for...   More >

Bellingcat on Open Source Investigation and Holding Governments Accountable

Presentation | October 18 | 4-6 p.m. |  North Gate Hall

 Eliot Higgins, Bellingcat

 Human Rights Center, Graduate School of Journalism

Internationally known open source investigator and HRC research Eliot Higgins, founder of Bellingcat, offers a presentation and workshop on using cutting edge tools and techniques, many developed by Bellingcat and by the Human Rights Investigations Lab at the Human Rights Center, to research and verify human rights abuses and war crimes.

Why the Constitution? The Problem of Taxes and Slavery

Lecture: Featuring History Faculty | October 18 | 4 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, This is a webinar event.

 Robin Einhorn, Professor, Department of History

 UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

UCBHSSP is pleased to co-sponsor with the National Humanities Center, this virtual scholar talk with the Professor Robin Einhorn of the UC Berkeley Department of History.

This webinar will examine the relevant clauses of the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution, along with extracts from and letters about the key debates in the Continental Congress, Philadelphia convention, and some...   More >

 This is a virtual event.

Race in Brazil: A Historical Overview

Lecture: Featuring History Students | October 18 | 6-8 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Brazil was the site of the largest slave-based economy in the Americas and the last country in the hemisphere to abolish the institution. For most of the twentieth century, Brazil was described as a “racial democracy” – a place where clear racial categories and race-based discrimination do not exist. This presentation discusses the history of slavery, emancipation, and post-emancipation in Brazil...   More >

Friday, October 19, 2018

Why Read Montaigne’s Essays?: “Why Read…? Series”

Lecture | October 19 | 12-2 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Antónia Szabari, University of Southern California; Carla Freccero, UC Santa Cruz; Diego Pirillo, UC Berkeley; Jane O. Newman, U.C. Irvine

 Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, D.E.

Round-table and discussion

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Hertha Sweet Wong: Picturing Identity: Contemporary American Autobiography in Image and Text

Lecture | October 24 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Wong explores the intersection of writing and visual art in the autobiographical work of Art Spiegelman, Faith Ringgold, Leslie Marmon Silko, and other American writers-artists who experiment with hybrid forms of self-narration.

From Dissertation to Book: Navigating the Publication Process

Workshop | October 24 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 309 Sproul Hall

 Library

Hear from a panel of experts - an acquisitions editor, a first-time author, and an author rights expert - about the process of turning your dissertation into a book. You’ll come away from this panel discussion with practical advice about revising your dissertation, writing a book proposal, approaching editors, signing your first contract, and navigating the peer review and...   More >

 

  RSVP online

The Chosen Ones: Black Men and the Politics of Redemption

Colloquium | October 24 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, 117, Academic Innovation Studio

 Nikki Jones, Associate Professor of African American Studies, UC Berkeley

 Clarence Ford, Masters Candidate, Goldman School of Public Policy, UC Berkeley

 Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, Center for the Study of Law and Society, American Cultures, Berkeley Underground Scholars

The discussion will be based on Dr. Jones's new book, The Chosen Ones: Black Men and the Politics of Redemption, as centers around the topic of the struggles faced by formerly incarcerated black men trying to fit back into their communities and the obstacles they face when attempting to integrate into greater society.

Friday, October 26, 2018

Islamic Texts Circle: Same-Sex Relations in the Qur'an

Workshop | October 26 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Asad Q. Ahmed, Near Eastern Studies

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The Islamic Texts Circle introduces the broader CMES community to important themes in the Islamic tradition via its holy scripture, the Qur’an, and via its long history of exegesis. Participants will gain exposure to the rich and variegated interpretive angles developed in the fourteen-hundred years of Islamic history, so that they may discuss relevant themes in the form of a productive dialogue....   More >

Managing and Maximizing Your Scholarly Impact

Workshop | October 26 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 309 Sproul Hall

 Library

This workshop will provide you with practical strategies and tips for promoting your scholarship, increasing your citations, and monitoring your success. You’ll also learn how to understand metrics, use scholarly networking tools, evaluate journals and publishing options, and take advantage of funding opportunities for Open Access scholarship.

 

  RSVP online

"Special Talent in the Chest, Special Eyes under the Brows": Jīn Shèngtàn’s (1608-1661) Discursion on Travel in his Commentary to The Story of the Western Wing: “胸中別才、眉下別眼”:金聖嘆《西廂記》漫筆遊記與評點

Colloquium | October 26 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Stephen H. West, Foundation Professor of Chinese; Head of East and Southeast Asian Section, Arizona State University

 Sophie Volpp, Associate Professor, Comparative Literature; EALC, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

An eccentric commentary to the famous drama The Story of the Western Wing (西廂記) may seem like strange place to begin a discussion about travel. But Jīn Shèngtàn's (金聖嘆) commentarial exegeses are in fact noted for their discursive nature.

Sunday, October 28, 2018

AIA - Ellen and Charles S. La Follette Lecture - Murder in the Agora: Violent Death and Illicit Burial in Ancient Athens

Lecture | October 28 | 2 p.m. | 142 Dwinelle Hall

 Maria Liston, Department of Anthropology, University of Waterloo

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

Violent crime and homicides are not a problem limited to the modern world alone, and the ancient city of Athens experienced similar events throughout antiquity. A recent study of all the human skeletons found in wells excavated by the American Excavations in the Athenian Agora has found that many of these individuals died violently. Some of the dead, including women and children, appear to be...   More >

Wednesday, October 31, 2018

How to Write a Research Proposal Workshop

Workshop | October 31 | 4-5 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll, Haas Scholars Program Manager/Advisor, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

 Office of Undergraduate Research

If you need to write a grant proposal, this workshop is for you! You'll get a headstart on defining your research question, developing a lit review and project plan, presenting your qualifications, and creating a realistic budget.

The workshop is open to all UC Berkeley students (undergraduate, graduate, and visiting scholars) regardless of academic discipline. It will be especially useful for...   More >

Thursday, November 1, 2018

On Routes of Slavery: The African Cultural Diaspora with Ahmad Sikainga

Lecture | November 1 |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Arts + Design

In collaboration with Cal Performances and the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, this lecture, presented by Ahmad Sikainga, will discuss the African Diaspora in relation to the performance The Routes of Slavery (1444–1888). Currently at the Department of History at the Ohio State University, Sikainga’s academic interests embrace the study of Africa, the African Diaspora, and the...   More >

Monday, November 5, 2018

Eric Calderwood: Colonial al-Andalus: Spain and the Making of Modern Moroccan Culture in Conversation with Professors Emily Gottreich (History) and Nasser Meerkhan (Near Eastern Studies)

Panel Discussion: Featuring History Faculty | November 5 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Eric Calderwood, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Drawing on a rich archive of Spanish, Arabic, French, and Catalan sources—including literature, historiography, journalism, political speeches, schoolbooks, tourist brochures, and visual arts—Calderwood reconstructs the varied political career of convivencia and al-Andalus, showing how shared pasts become raw material for divergent contemporary ideologies, including Spanish fascism and Moroccan...   More >

Avenali Lecture: Todd Gitlin: The Other 1968s: Counterrevolution, Communism and Desublimation

Lecture | November 5 | 6:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

In his exploration of a watershed political year, Professor of journalism and sociology at Columbia University Todd Gitlin unearths a "thrust toward retrogression" that stands in stark contrast to the popular image of 1968 as a politically progressive moment.

Todd Gitlin Photo by Edwin Tse

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Anne Nesbet: The Orphan Band of Springdale

Lecture | November 7 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Nesbet’s historical novel for younger readers takes place during World War II in Springdale, Maine. It tells the story of eleven-year-old Gusta, who is sent to live in an orphanage run by her grandmother after her labor-organizer father is forced to flee the country.

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Earth Writing: ISAS Faculty Workshop led by Prof. Sharad Chari

Workshop | November 13 | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Lenore Manderson, Public Health and Medical Anthropology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; Sumathi Ramaswamy, James B. Duke Professor of History and International Comparative Studies, Duke University; Amita Baviskar, Sociology, Institute of Economic Growth, New Delhi; Kath Weston, Anthropology, University of Virginia; Geeta Patel, Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Virginia

 Sharad Chari, Geography, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Department of Geography, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Alan Dundes Distinguished Chair in Folklore

In our time of unprecedented instrumentalization and transformation of earthly and worldly processes, from the scale of the body to the planet, the Earth-Writing Symposium returns to the question of ‘geography’ as the praxis of ‘Earth-writing.’ Attention to the ‘graphia’ in ‘geography’ points us to a variety of forms of writing or inscription with, through or alongside material, earthly or...   More >

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Daniel Boyarin: Judaism: The Genealogy of a Modern Notion

Lecture | November 14 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Boyarin argues that the very concept of a religion of “Judaism” is an invention of the Christian church that was adopted by Jews only with the coming of modernity and the spread of Christian languages.

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Situated Knowledges Thirty Years Later

Conference/Symposium | November 15 | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. | 470 Stephens Hall

 Alastair Iles, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, U.C. Berkeley; Mitali Thakor, Assistant Professor, Science in Society Program, Wesleyan University; Sarah E. Vaughn, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, U.C. Berkeley; Jennifer L. Derr, Assistant Professor, Department of History, U.C. Santa Cruz; Lisa A. Brooks, Doctoral Candidate, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, U.C. Berkeley; Paul Michael L. Atienza, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Michael Mascarenhas, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, U.C. Berkeley; Victoria Massie, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Anthropology, U.C. Berkeley

 Sibyl Diver, Research Scientist, Department of Earth Systems Science, Stanford University

 Ashton Wesner, Doctoral Candidate, Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, U.C. Berkeley

 Julie Pyatt, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, U.C. Berkeley

 Kathleen Cruz Gutierrez, Doctoral Candidate, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, U.C. Berkeley

 Center for Science, Technology, Medicine & Society, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mgmt. (ESPM), Filipino & Philippine Studies Working Group, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, Science and Technology Studies Working Group

This day-long conference will celebrate and challenge the intellectual legacy of Donna Haraway's "Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective." Presenters from various disciplines will reflect on the impact of "situated knowledges" while offering new perspectives on and revisions to the concept since its introduction.

Situated Knowledges Thirty Years Later

Conference/Symposium | November 15 | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | 470 Stephens Hall

 Center for Science, Technology, Medicine & Society, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mgmt. (ESPM), Filipino & Philippine Studies Working Group

This day-long conference will celebrate and challenge the intellectual legacy of Donna Haraway's "Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective." Presenters from various disciplines will reflect on the impact of "situated knowledges" while offering new perspectives on and revisions to the concept since its introduction.

On Indian Ground: California. A Return to Indigenous Knowledge: Generating Hope, Leadership, and Sovereignty through Education

Colloquium | November 15 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues), Wildavsky Conference Room

 Nicole Lim, J.D., Executive Director, California Indian Museum and Cultural Center

 Joely Proudfit, Ph.D., Director California Indian Culture & Sovereignty Center Professor, American Indian Studies Department Chair and Professor, American Indian Studies, California State University San Marcos

 Center for Native American Issues Research on, American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Student Development, Native American Studies, American Indian Graduate Student Association, Indigenous Language Revitalization DE, Graduate School of Education

Authors and Editors of On Indian Ground: California, Proudfit and Lim will discuss issues related to Native American education reform in California. They will address the impacts of genocide, colonization, racism and historical bias upon curriculum and student achievement. Additionally, they will present holistic indigenous perspectives that can be integrated into systems of education to foster...   More >

Raza Ahmad Rumi | The Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture for 2018: Title TBD

Lecture | November 15 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Raza Ahmad Rumi, Pakistani writer and a public policy specialist

 Munis Faruqui, Chair, Institute for South Asia Studies, Associate Professor of South and Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative, The Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture

Pakistani writer and a public policy specialist, Reza Ahmad Rumi delivers our sixth Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture.

AIA Lecture - Pottery, Paintings, and Pinakides: the latest dirt from the excavation of Petsas House, Mycenae

Lecture | November 15 | 7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Kim Shelton, Associate Professor of Classics and Director, the Nemea Center for Classical Archaeology

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

This elaborately illustrated lecture will present the results of ten seasons of excavation by the Archaeological Society of Athens at ‘Petsas House’ in the settlement of the famous Bronze Age palatial center at Mycenae. A look into a complex structure of the 14th century BCE reveals domestic and workshop use together with an expanding role in the socio-political life of the palace. Pottery, as...   More >

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

V.D Savarkar - The Politics, Poetics and History of Hindu Nationalism: ISAS Faculty Workshop led by Prof. Janaki Bakhle

Workshop: Featuring History Faculty | November 27 | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Thomas Blom Hansen, Professor in South Asian Studies and Professor in Anthropology, Stanford University; Vidyut Aklujkar, Research Associate, Centre for India and South Asia Research, University of British Columbia; Christian Novetzke, Professor in the South Asia Program, the Comparative Religion Program, and the International Studies Program at the University of Washington’s Jackson School of International Studies; Vasudha Paramasivan, Assistant Professor of South & Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley; Sudipta Sen, Professor of History at the University of California, Davis

 Janaki Bakhle, Associate Professor of History, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

Presenter Bios
Thomas Blom Hansen is the Reliance-Dhirubhai Ambani Professor in South Asian Studies and Professor in Anthropology. He is the author of The Saffron Wave: Democracy and Hindu Nationalism in Modern India (Princeton 1999); Wages of Violence: Naming and Identity in Postcolonial Bombay...   More >

Friday, November 30, 2018

Colloquium:Annette Richards Cornell University: title TBA

Colloquium | November 30 | 4:30 p.m. | 128 Morrison Hall

 Department of Music

Annette Richards is Professor of Music and University Organist at Cornell, and the Executive Director of the Westfield Center for Historical Keyboard Studies. She is a performer and scholar with a specialty in 18th-century music and aesthetics, and interdisciplinary research into music, literature and visual culture. She is founding editor of Keyboard Perspectives, a yearbook dedicated to...   More >

Wednesday, December 5, 2018

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Barbara Spackman: Accidental Orientalists: Modern Italian Travelers in Ottoman Lands

Lecture | December 5 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Spackman’s account, which won the 2017 American Association for Italian Studies Best Book Prize, examines narratives by Italians who, through historical accident, found themselves in Ottoman Egypt and Anatolia in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Tuesday, January 29, 2019

AIA Lecture - Joukowsky Lecture - Remembering Boudica: Monuments of a Barbarian Queen

Lecture | January 29 | 7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Alison Futrell, Department of History, University of Arizona

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

Empire! Taxes! Violation! Massacre! In the early years of his reign, the emperor Nero briefly considered withdrawing the legions from the new province of Britannia. Before he could do so, the stability of empire was shaken by revolt, as Boudica, a tribal queen pushed beyond her limits by the excesses of the Roman colonizers, exacted a horrifying retribution, with deaths in the tens of thousands....   More >

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Theology and the Public University

Conference/Symposium | February 21 – 23, 2019 every day |  UC Berkeley Campus

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

For the past two years, the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, supported by the Henry Luce Foundation, has convened a series of workshops and seminars concerning, broadly speaking, the place of theology in the university. From the outset, our goal was to challenge narrow conceptions of both secular learning and “theology,” in hopes of fostering robust conversation about the teaching of...   More >

Friday, February 22, 2019

Theology and the Public University

Conference/Symposium | February 21 – 23, 2019 every day |  UC Berkeley Campus

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

For the past two years, the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, supported by the Henry Luce Foundation, has convened a series of workshops and seminars concerning, broadly speaking, the place of theology in the university. From the outset, our goal was to challenge narrow conceptions of both secular learning and “theology,” in hopes of fostering robust conversation about the teaching of...   More >

Saturday, February 23, 2019

Theology and the Public University

Conference/Symposium | February 21 – 23, 2019 every day |  UC Berkeley Campus

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

For the past two years, the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, supported by the Henry Luce Foundation, has convened a series of workshops and seminars concerning, broadly speaking, the place of theology in the university. From the outset, our goal was to challenge narrow conceptions of both secular learning and “theology,” in hopes of fostering robust conversation about the teaching of...   More >

A UCBHSSP Un-Conference

Workshop | February 23 | 9 a.m.-1 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

UCBHSSP invites Bay Area educators to participate in an "un-conference." This participate-driven event will allow teachers to share and learn from one another with regard to how they are approaching history instruction at this historical moment - What does this moment demand of us as history teachers?

 This event is directed at educators.

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

AIA Lecture

Lecture | March 6 | 7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

What’s Theology Got to Do with It? An Eighteenth-Century Chinese Emperor Debating Religions and Christianity

Lecture | March 13 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Eugenio Menegon, Associate Professor of Chinese History, Boston University; Collaborative Scholar, Institute for Advanced Jesuit Studies, Boston College

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

In his Lettres chinoises, indiennes et tartares, Voltaire republished “a note by the good Kangxi Emperor to the Peking Jesuits” as follows: “The emperor is surprised to see you so stubborn in your ideas. Why would you worry so much about a world where you have not been yet? Enjoy the present. Your God must be pained by your preoccupations...   More >

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Race and the Apparatus of Disposability

Lecture | April 10 | 5:30 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Multicultural Community Center

 Center for Race and Gender

SHERENE H. RAZACK
DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR AND THE PENNY KANNER ENDOWED CHAIR IN GENDER STUDIES, UCLA
Tuesday, April 10, 2018
5:30pm – Reception
6pm – Lecture

Disposability, a condition written on the body, is a racial project. Populations that stand in the way of the progress of capital accumulation, are targeted for disposability, and relegated to the realm of “sub-humanity.” Processes of...   More >

Ongoing Events

Pièces de Résistance: Echoes of Judaea Capta From Ancient Coins to Modern Art

Exhibit - Multimedia | August 28 – December 14, 2018 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

This exhibition will be continuing in Spring 2019.

Notions of resistance, alongside fears and realities of oppression, resound throughout Jewish history. As a minority, Jews express their political aspirations, ideals of heroism, and yearnings of retaliation and redemption in their rituals, art, and everyday life.

Centering on coins in The Magnes Collection, this exhibition explores how...   More >

Project “Holy Land”: Yaakov Benor-Kalter’s Photographs of British Mandate Palestine, 1923-1940

Exhibit - Photography | August 28 – December 14, 2018 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4:05 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

For nearly two decades, Yaakov (Jacob) Benor-Kalter (1897-1969) traversed the Old City of Jerusalem, documenting renowned historical monuments, ambiguous subjects in familiar alleyways, and scores of “new Jews” building a new homeland. Benor-Kalter’s photographs smoothly oscillate between two worlds, and two Holy Lands, with one lens.

After immigrating from Poland to the British Mandate of...   More >

Facing West 1: Camera Portraits from the Bancroft Collection

Exhibit - Photography | November 9, 2018 – March 15, 2019 every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. |  Bancroft Library

 Bancroft Library

The first part of a double exhibition celebrating the tenth anniversary of the renewed Bancroft Library and its gallery, Facing West 1 presents a cavalcade of individuals who made, and continue to make, California and the American West. These camera portraits highlight the communities and peoples of Hubert Howe Bancroft’s original collecting region, which extended from the Rockies to the Pacific...   More >