Upcoming Events

Monday, November 26, 2018

"If My Friends Could See Me Now": A History of Filipina American Dreams

Colloquium: History Department Events | November 26 | 12-2 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Catherine Ceniza Choy, Professor of Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies and Department Chair, Department of Ethnic Studies

 Department of History

What would happen if we placed the lives of Filipino women at the center of a transnational narrative about U.S. and Philippine histories? This talk explores the connections and divergences among three Filipino women who migrated to the United States at different times during the twentieth century, led singular careers in education, public...   More >

Xenophobic Attitudes and Parties in Central and Eastern Europe

Lecture | November 26 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Dániel Róna, Hungarian Academy of Sciences; Fulbright Visiting Scholar, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

When do xenophobic attitudes translate into partisan choice? What supply- and demand-side factors determine the electoral success of far-right parties in the region? This presentation seeks to examine the views of the electorate on minorities (Roma, Gypsy, and migrant populations), the stance of parties, the political agenda, and the institutionalization of party systems in the Czech Republic,...   More >

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

V.D Savarkar - The Politics, Poetics and History of Hindu Nationalism: ISAS Faculty Workshop led by Prof. Janaki Bakhle

Workshop: Featuring History Faculty | November 27 | 10 a.m.-5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Thomas Blom Hansen, Professor in South Asian Studies and Professor in Anthropology, Stanford University; Vidyut Aklujkar, Research Associate, Centre for India and South Asia Research, University of British Columbia; Christian Novetzke, Professor in the South Asia Program, the Comparative Religion Program, and the International Studies Program at the University of Washington’s Jackson School of International Studies; Vasudha Paramasivan, Assistant Professor of South & Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley; Sudipta Sen, Professor of History at the University of California, Davis; Christine Philliou, Associate Professor of History, UC Berkeley

 Janaki Bakhle, Associate Professor of History, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

Presenter Bios
Thomas Blom Hansen is the Reliance-Dhirubhai Ambani Professor in South Asian Studies and Professor in Anthropology. He is the author of The Saffron Wave: Democracy and Hindu Nationalism in Modern India (Princeton 1999); Wages of Violence: Naming and Identity in Postcolonial Bombay...   More >

Memory and Democracy: Civil and 'Uncivil' Activism for Remembrance in Germany and Beyond

Lecture | November 27 | 6 p.m. | 170 Wurster Hall

 Jenny Wüstenberg, DAAD Visiting Assistant Professor in Politics, York University in Toronto

 Greg Castillo, Associate Professor of Architecture, School of Environmental Design at the University of California, Berkeley; Andrew Shanken, Professor of Architecture, School of Environmental Design at the University of California, Berkeley

 Institute of European Studies, DAAD - Deutscher Akademiker Austauschdienst

Across the country, civic activism is toppling statues in the name of historical justice. The debate over how to confront our racist, colonial, or genocidal past – and the ways history challenges contemporary democratic governance – has recently made headlines. Examining the relationship between memory and democracy, Jenny Wüstenberg’s work focuses on how grassroots actors engage with...   More >

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

What is the future of archaeology in Greece? How the nation-building project devalues archaeology and the quest for relevance

Lecture | November 28 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Anastasia Sakellariadi, Honorary Research Associate, UCL Institute of Archaeology

 Archaeological Research Facility

Dr. Sakellariadi demonstrates through research focusing on three local communities how an exclusive emphasis on the glory of the past and its physical manifestations has rendered this past irrelevant to contemporary Greeks. She argues that another archaeology is possible in Greece.

Researching Segregation/Reporting Segregation

Panel Discussion | November 28 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 Alex Schafran, Lecturer, School of Geography, University of Leeds; Devin Katayama and Sandhya Dirks, Creators of the American Suburb podcast, KQED; Rachel Brahinsky, Director of Urban and Public Affairs Program, University of San Francisco

 Sasha Khokha, Host of the California Report, KQED

 Karen Frick, Department of City and Regional Planning, UC Berkeley

 Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, Department of City + Regional Planning

Panel Discussion and Book Launch

Thursday, November 29, 2018

How to Write a Research Proposal Workshop

Workshop: History Department Events | November 29 | 2-3 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll, Haas Scholars Program Manager/Advisor, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Need to write a grant proposal? This workshop is for you! You'll get a head start on defining your research question, developing a lit review and project plan, presenting your qualifications, and creating a realistic budget.

Open to all UC Berkeley students.

The Gerald D. and Norma Feldman Annual Lecture: The Life and Death of the Russian Revolution

Lecture: History Department Events: Featuring History Faculty | November 29 | 4-6 p.m. |  Bancroft Hotel

 2680 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Professor Yuri Slezkine, Jane K. Sather Professor of History, Dept. of History

 Institute of European Studies, Department of History, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

This talk will follow the lives of the original Bolsheviks from the time they joined the apocalyptic sect known as “the party of a new type” to the time most of them were arrested for terrorism and treason. It will focus on the connection between private lives and millenarian expectations and attempt to clarify the reasons for socialism’s premature demise.

Race and the Apparatus of Disposability

Lecture | November 29 | 5:30-7:30 p.m. | Simon Hall, Goldberg Room, room 297, Berkeley Law

 Center for Race and Gender

SHERENE H. RAZACK
DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR AND THE PENNY KANNER ENDOWED CHAIR IN GENDER STUDIES, UCLA

5:30pm – Reception
6pm – Lecture

Disposability, a condition written on the body, is a racial project. Populations that stand in the way of the progress of capital accumulation, are targeted for disposability, and relegated to the realm of “sub-humanity.” Processes of...   More >

Friday, November 30, 2018

Colloquium:Annette Richards Cornell University: title TBA

Colloquium | November 30 | 4:30 p.m. | 128 Morrison Hall

 Department of Music

Annette Richards is Professor of Music and University Organist at Cornell, and the Executive Director of the Westfield Center for Historical Keyboard Studies. She is a performer and scholar with a specialty in 18th-century music and aesthetics, and interdisciplinary research into music, literature and visual culture. She is founding editor of Keyboard Perspectives, a yearbook dedicated to...   More >

Hamshen at the Crossroads of the Past and the Present

Lecture | November 30 | 7:30-9:30 p.m. | Saroyan Hall, Khachaturian Community Center, Saroyan Hall

 825 Brotherhood Way, San Francisco, CA 94132

 Lusineh Sahakian, Associate Professor, Department of Turkish Studies, Yerevan State University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program

The U.C. Berkeley Armenian Studies Program
The Hamazkayin Nigol Aghpalian Chapter
The ARF Krisdapor Gomideh

Invite you to a lecture and video presentation

Speaker
Dr. Lusineh Sahakian
Associate Professor, Department of Turkish Studies (Yerevan State University)

Title of the talk and of the documentary

Hamshen at the Crossroads of the Past and the Present

Location and Time:...   More >

Saturday, December 1, 2018

The Beauty and Complexity of Islamic Geometric Patterns: Historical Development and Traditional Design Methodology

Lecture | December 1 | 7-9 p.m. |  Zaytuna College

 2401 Le Conte Ave., Berkeley, CA 94578

 Jay Bonner

 Zaytuna College

This lecture and book signing will cover geometric complexity as a vehicle for beauty within the tradition of Islamic geometric art. In addition to historical development and traditional design methodology, this lecture and visual presentation will focus on geometric stratagems for complexity, including self-similarity and quasiperiodicity.

About the Speaker: Jay Bonner is a consulting...   More >

Monday, December 3, 2018

The History and Science of Paper in Manuscripts of Central Asia

Lecture | December 3 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Agnieszka Helman-Ważny, University of Hamburg & University of Warsaw

 Tang Center for Silk Road Studies

Manuscripts from the Silk Road have been used as a key source in the study of religions, literature, and the cultural history of Central Asia. However, they have hardly ever been viewed as artifacts in their own right. As one of the most important physical features of a manuscript, paper serves as a means to distinguish one type of manuscript from another, and can help to determine the origin of...   More >

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

Vertigo in a High Place, or, Rapaz amid the Ontologies

Workshop | December 4 | 3-6 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Frank Salomon, John V. Murra Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

 Archaeological Research Facility

Rapaz is a village in the western range of the Peruvian Andes, notable for maintaining a temple called Kaha Wayi to the mountain powers or “owners” of water and weather. Rapaz is also known for its patrimonial collection of cord records called khipu. Within Kaha Wayi’s murky chamber both political self-government and rituals managing relations with the environment take place. Work in Kaha Wayi...   More >

Wednesday, December 5, 2018

CANCELLED: Berkeley Book Chat with Barbara Spackman: Accidental Orientalists: Modern Italian Travelers in Ottoman Lands

Lecture | December 5 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room | Canceled

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Spackman’s account, which won the 2017 American Association for Italian Studies Best Book Prize, examines narratives by Italians who, through historical accident, found themselves in Ottoman Egypt and Anatolia in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Friday, January 25, 2019

No Laughing Matter: Learning to Speak the "Common Language" in 1950s China

Colloquium: Featuring History Faculty | January 25 | 4 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Janet Chen, Associate Professor of History and East Asian Studies, Princeton University

 Wen-hsin Yeh, Professor, Department of History, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

In the winter and early spring of 1956, a series of articles appeared in nationally circulating publications, featuring an earnest entreaty: please do not laugh at those who are trying to learn putonghua, the “common language” of the socialist state. Beyond the headlines, permutations of the same refrain echoed in different forums. At the opening stages of a campaign to “popularize the common...   More >

Tuesday, January 29, 2019

AIA Lecture - Joukowsky Lecture - Remembering Boudica: Monuments of a Barbarian Queen

Lecture | January 29 | 7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Alison Futrell, Department of History, University of Arizona

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

Empire! Taxes! Violation! Massacre! In the early years of his reign, the emperor Nero briefly considered withdrawing the legions from the new province of Britannia. Before he could do so, the stability of empire was shaken by revolt, as Boudica, a tribal queen pushed beyond her limits by the excesses of the Roman colonizers, exacted a horrifying retribution, with deaths in the tens of thousands....   More >

Thursday, February 7, 2019

Deep Impunity

Lecture | February 7 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Kamala Visweswaran,, Professor in Ethnic Studies, UCSD

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by cultural anthropologist Kamala Visweswaran, Professor in Ethnic Studies, UCSD.

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Faiz Ahmed | Afghanistan Rising: Islamic Law and Statecraft between the Ottoman and British Empires

Lecture | February 19 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Faiz Ahmed, Associate Professor of History, Brown University

 Wali Ahmadi, Associate Professor of Persian Literature, Dept. of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, The Berkeley Urdu Initiative, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative

A talk by Assistant Professor of History at Brown University, Dr. Faiz Ahmed on his new book, Afghanistan Rising: Islamic Law and Statecraft between the Ottoman and British Empires.

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Bancroft Library Roundtable: Migrants in the Making: Invisible Agricultural Child Labor and the Limits of Citizenship, 1938-1965

Lecture | February 21 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Ivón Padilla-Rodríguez, PhD candidate in History at Columbia University and Visiting Dissertation Research Scholar at the UC Berkeley Latinx Research Center

 Bancroft Library

Farm work is the most hazardous industry for young workers. Yet, despite the implementation of a national child labor ban in 1938, Latinx children continue to toil in fields nationwide with an estimated 200,000-500,000 agricultural child laborers employed each year. Ivón Padilla-Rodríguez has identified the child labor ban's agricultural exemption as the reason for this disjuncture.

 The Lewis-Latimer Room has a maximum capacity of 28 people. The doors will be shut and no more attendees may enter once the room is at capacity.

Friday, February 22, 2019

Theology and the Public University

Conference/Symposium | February 22 – 23, 2019 every day |  UC Berkeley Campus | Note change in date

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

For the past two years, the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, supported by the Henry Luce Foundation, has convened a series of workshops and seminars concerning, broadly speaking, the place of theology in the university. From the outset, our goal was to challenge narrow conceptions of both secular learning and “theology,” in hopes of fostering robust conversation about the teaching of...   More >

Points of Transition: Ovoo and the Ritual Remaking of Religious, Ecological, and Historical Politics in Inner Asia

Conference/Symposium | February 22 | 10 a.m.-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Townsend Center for the Humanities

Ovoo, the structures of stones, trees, scarves, skulls, steering wheel covers, and a staggering array of other objects that are ubiquitous across the landscape of contemporary Mongolia, Buryatia, Inner Mongolia, and Qinghai, have long marked sites where ritual, though often highly spontaneous, practices invoke the presence of immanent relations. Built and maintained by various publics, gatherings...   More >

Saturday, February 23, 2019

Theology and the Public University

Conference/Symposium | February 22 – 23, 2019 every day |  UC Berkeley Campus | Note change in date

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

For the past two years, the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, supported by the Henry Luce Foundation, has convened a series of workshops and seminars concerning, broadly speaking, the place of theology in the university. From the outset, our goal was to challenge narrow conceptions of both secular learning and “theology,” in hopes of fostering robust conversation about the teaching of...   More >

A UCBHSSP Un-Conference

Workshop | February 23 | 9 a.m.-1 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

UCBHSSP invites Bay Area educators to participate in an "un-conference." This participate-driven event will allow teachers to share and learn from one another with regard to how they are approaching history instruction at this historical moment - What does this moment demand of us as history teachers?

 This event is directed at educators.

Monday, February 25, 2019

Kalunga: Kongo Thought in Africa and the Americas

Lecture | February 25 | 4-6 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife room

 Ned Sublette

 Department of English

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Around Arthur Szyk: Berkeley Scholars on Art and History: Poland Reborn: A State Between Democracy and Fascism

Lecture: Featuring History Faculty | February 26 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

This talk focuses on the divided Poland that emerged after World War I. On the one hand Poland had to accommodate the demands of generations of freedom fighters, while on the other...   More >

 

  RSVP online or by calling 5106432526

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Public University, Public Values

Lecture | February 28 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220

 Maggie Nelson, Professor of English, University of Southern California

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Public University, Public Values is a new series of talks and conversations co-organized by BCSR and the Townsend Center for the Humanities. The series is prompted by the recognition that the current moment of crisis in the liberal democracies of Europe and North America is, among other things, a crisis of value. The “political” focus that has shaped the humanities and much of the social...   More >

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

AIA Lecture

Lecture | March 6 | 7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

Thursday, March 7, 2019

Critical Public Theology: How to Use and Not to Use the Bible in Contemporary Public Issues

Lecture | March 7 | 5-7 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall | Note change in location

 Konrad Schmid, Professor of Old Testament Science and Early Jewish Religious History, University of Zürich

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

The Bible sometimes plays a major role in current, political discourses, especially in the United States. As a project, public theology supports efforts to let the Bible speak to contemporary, public concerns. But using the Bible in this way involves many potential traps. How can a 2000 year old book provide guidance for social and political challenges? Should it do so at all? This lecture argues...   More >

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

What’s Theology Got to Do with It? An Eighteenth-Century Chinese Emperor Debating Religions and Christianity

Lecture | March 13 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Eugenio Menegon, Associate Professor of Chinese History, Boston University; Collaborative Scholar, Institute for Advanced Jesuit Studies, Boston College

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

In his Lettres chinoises, indiennes et tartares, Voltaire republished “a note by the good Kangxi Emperor to the Peking Jesuits” as follows: “The emperor is surprised to see you so stubborn in your ideas. Why would you worry so much about a world where you have not been yet? Enjoy the present. Your God must be pained by your preoccupations...   More >

Monday, March 18, 2019

Governance and Transitions of Power in Taiwan

Conference/Symposium | March 18 – 19, 2019 every day | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

This conference investigates the nexus between changes in governance and transitions of power in Taiwan. The conference would address two broad themes:

1) How have deficiencies in participatory institutions or limited access by various social groups to the political process affected transitions of power? How have social groups demanded access to political decision-making? Papers could address...   More >

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Governance and Transitions of Power in Taiwan

Conference/Symposium | March 18 – 19, 2019 every day | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

This conference investigates the nexus between changes in governance and transitions of power in Taiwan. The conference would address two broad themes:

1) How have deficiencies in participatory institutions or limited access by various social groups to the political process affected transitions of power? How have social groups demanded access to political decision-making? Papers could address...   More >

Around Arthur Szyk: Berkeley Scholars on Art and History: Visual Judaica: Jewish Icons and Collecting Patterns in the early 20th century

Lecture | March 19 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

The highly decorative works of Arthur Szyk contain key Jewish visual elements such as the Lion of Judah, the dove, and the seven spices mentioned in the bible as typical of the Land of Israel. These themes are repeated in Szyk’s oeuvre throughout his life and can be found in his early pieces ("Book of Esther," 1925) as well as in later ones ("Pathways Through the Bible," 1946). In this talk, we...   More >

 

  RSVP online or by calling 5106432526

Monday, April 1, 2019

Lecture by Shirley Thompson: Title TBA

Lecture | April 1 | 3-5:15 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife room

 Shirley Thompson, Associate Professor, Department of American Studies, UT Austin

 Department of English

Thursday, April 4, 2019

Jorge Flores | Unwanted Neighbors: The Mughals, the Portuguese, and Their Frontier Zones

Lecture | April 4 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Jorge Flores, Professor of Early Modern Global History, Department of History and Civilization, European University Institute, Florence

 Munis D. Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & South East Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

In December 1572 the Mughal emperor Akbar arrived in the port city of Khambayat. Having been raised in distant Kabul, Akbar had never in his thirty years been to the Ocean. Presumably anxious with the news about the Mughal military campaign in Gujarat, several Portuguese merchants in Khambayat rushed to Akbar’s presence. This encounter marked the beginning of a long, complex, and unequal...   More >

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Berkeley Lecture on Religious Tolerance

Lecture | April 10 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220

 Jan Assman, Professor Emeritus, Egyptology Institute, University of Heidelberg and the Department of History and Sociology, University of Konstanz

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Lecture details are forthcoming.

Jan Assman is Professor Emeritus, Egyptology Institute, University of Heidelberg and the Department of History and Sociology, University of Konstanz. His English-language books include Moses the Egyptian (1997), The Search for God in Ancient Egypt (2002), Death and Salvation in Ancient Egypt (2006), and The Price of Monotheism...   More >

Thursday, April 18, 2019

Bancroft Library Roundtable: Cherokees and Choctaws Among the Miwok and Yokuts: Legacies of Cultural Blending and Intertribal Relations in Nineteenth Century California

Lecture | April 18 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Andrew Shaler, PhD candidate in History, UC Riverside

 Bancroft Library

The California Gold Rush is remembered for the thousands of immigrants who traversed continents and oceans for a chance to gain quick wealth. Lost in these narratives are the rich histories of Native American emigrants who made the same journey to California’s Gold Country beginning in 1849. Andrew Shaler considers the legacies of these Native emigrants.

 The Lewis-Latimer Room has a maximum capacity of 28 people. The doors will be shut and no more attendees may enter once the room is at capacity.

Thursday, April 25, 2019

"Doing" Political Theology Today: Promises and Pitfalls

Lecture | April 25 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Ruth Marshall, Associate Professor of Religion & Political Science, University of Toronto

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Lecture details forthcoming.

Ruth Marshall received her DPhil in Politics from Oxford University, and joined both the Department for the Study of Religion and Political Science in 2008, after having spent 8 years living and researching in West Africa. She is the author of Political Spiritualities: The Pentecostal Revolution in Nigeria (U. Chicago Press, 2009) and numerous scholarly...   More >

Thursday, May 16, 2019

Bancroft Library Roundtable: "Loans for the Little Fellow": Credit, Crisis, and Recovery in the Great Depression

Lecture | May 16 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Sarah Quincy, PhD candidate in Economics at UC Davis

 Bancroft Library

Both lauded as “the great bank of the West” and reviled as a “huge financial octopus,” the Bank of America introduced several modern banking practices during the Great Depression, which played an integral role in California’s development. Sarah Quincy will discuss her research on the impacts of this unusual bank on the state’s economy during the 1920s and 1930s.

 The Lewis-Latimer Room has a maximum capacity of 28 people. The doors will be shut and no more attendees may enter once the room is at capacity.

Ongoing Events

Facing West 1: Camera Portraits from the Bancroft Collection

Exhibit - Photography | November 9, 2018 – March 15, 2019 every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. |  Bancroft Library

 Bancroft Library

The first part of a double exhibition celebrating the tenth anniversary of the renewed Bancroft Library and its gallery, Facing West 1 presents a cavalcade of individuals who made, and continue to make, California and the American West. These camera portraits highlight the communities and peoples of Hubert Howe Bancroft’s original collecting region, which extended from the Rockies to the Pacific...   More >

Pièces de Résistance: Echoes of Judaea Capta From Ancient Coins to Modern Art

Exhibit - Multimedia | August 28 – December 14, 2018 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

This exhibition will be continuing in Spring 2019.

Notions of resistance, alongside fears and realities of oppression, resound throughout Jewish history. As a minority, Jews express their political aspirations, ideals of heroism, and yearnings of retaliation and redemption in their rituals, art, and everyday life.

Centering on coins in The Magnes Collection, this exhibition explores how...   More >

Project “Holy Land”: Yaakov Benor-Kalter’s Photographs of British Mandate Palestine, 1923-1940

Exhibit - Photography | August 28 – December 14, 2018 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4:05 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

For nearly two decades, Yaakov (Jacob) Benor-Kalter (1897-1969) traversed the Old City of Jerusalem, documenting renowned historical monuments, ambiguous subjects in familiar alleyways, and scores of “new Jews” building a new homeland. Benor-Kalter’s photographs smoothly oscillate between two worlds, and two Holy Lands, with one lens.

After immigrating from Poland to the British Mandate of...   More >

Pièces de Résistance: Echoes of Judaea Capta From Ancient Coins to Modern Art

Exhibit - Multimedia | January 29 – June 28, 2019 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

This exhibition will be continuing in Spring 2019.

Notions of resistance, alongside fears and realities of oppression, resound throughout Jewish history. As a minority, Jews express their political aspirations, ideals of heroism, and yearnings of retaliation and redemption in their rituals, art, and everyday life.

Centering on coins in The Magnes Collection, this exhibition explores how...   More >

Project “Holy Land”: Yaakov Benor-Kalter’s Photographs of British Mandate Palestine, 1923-1940

Exhibit - Photography | January 29 – June 28, 2019 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4:05 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

For nearly two decades, Yaakov (Jacob) Benor-Kalter (1897-1969) traversed the Old City of Jerusalem, documenting renowned historical monuments, ambiguous subjects in familiar alleyways, and scores of “new Jews” building a new homeland. Benor-Kalter’s photographs smoothly oscillate between two worlds, and two Holy Lands, with one lens.

After immigrating from Poland to the British Mandate of...   More >