Upcoming Events

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Of Pathogens and Humans. A Cultural History of the Policies on Epidemics in the Nineteenth Century

Lecture | January 22 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Andrea Wiegeshoff, Marburg University (Germany)

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West – Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC

In the nineteenth century, epidemics reached, for the first time in history, all inhabited continents. Globally spreading pathogens were an unintended side effect of a growing flow of people, animals and goods across state borders, imperial spaces and continents. "Of pathogens and humans" is an ongoing research project that analyzes reactions to increasingly mobile diseases in the American and...   More >

How to Write a Research Proposal Workshop

Workshop | January 22 | 4-5 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll, Haas Scholars Program Manager/Advisor, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Need to write a grant proposal? This workshop is for you! You'll get a head start on defining your research question, developing a lit review and project plan, presenting your qualifications, and creating a realistic budget.

Open to all UC Berkeley students.

Khalid Ben Srhir, "Jewish Studies in the Islamic World"

Lecture | January 22 | 5:30-7 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Professor Khalid Ben Srhir is by academic trade an expert on British-Moroccan relations. However, in Morocco he is known for his unique accomplishments in the fields of both translation and Jewish studies. Ben Srhir started his career as a primary teacher in Morocco’s southern hinterland before he joined University Mohamed V as a Professor. Today, he is not only the editor of the oldest history...   More >

Friday, January 25, 2019

No Laughing Matter: Learning to Speak the "Common Language" in 1950s China

Colloquium: Featuring History Faculty | January 25 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Janet Chen, Associate Professor of History and East Asian Studies, Princeton University

 Wen-hsin Yeh, Professor, Department of History, UC Berkeley

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

In the winter and early spring of 1956, a series of articles appeared in nationally circulating publications, featuring an earnest entreaty: please do not laugh at those who are trying to learn putonghua, the “common language” of the socialist state. Beyond the headlines, permutations of the same refrain echoed in different forums. At the opening stages of a campaign to “popularize the common...   More >

Monday, January 28, 2019

The Subversive Pedagogy of Yugoslav Surrealism: Aleksandar Vuco and Dusan Matic’s The Exploits of the “Five Cockerels” Gang

Lecture | January 28 | 4-6 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Aleksandar Boskovic, Lecturer in Bosnian, Croatian & Serbian, Columbia University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

The 1933 collaborative surrealist book The Exploits of the “Five Cockerels” Gang marks the end of the historical avant-gardes in Yugoslavia. Created by two prominent Belgrade Surrealists –Aleksandar Vuco, who wrote the verses, and Dusan Matic, who authored the foreword, collages, as well as the “explanations” of the collages—The Exploits is one of the examples of avant-garde...   More >

Tuesday, January 29, 2019

AIA Lecture - Joukowsky Lecture - Remembering Boudica: Monuments of a Barbarian Queen

Lecture | January 29 | 7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Alison Futrell, Department of History, University of Arizona

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

Empire! Taxes! Violation! Massacre! In the early years of his reign, the emperor Nero briefly considered withdrawing the legions from the new province of Britannia. Before he could do so, the stability of empire was shaken by revolt, as Boudica, a tribal queen pushed beyond her limits by the excesses of the Roman colonizers, exacted a horrifying retribution, with deaths in the tens of thousands....   More >

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

The Clothes on Their Backs: Sartorial Practices of Self-making within the African Diaspora

Lecture | January 30 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Ayana Omilade Flewellen, University of California President's Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

 Archaeological Research Facility

Through an analysis of material culture and documentary data, my work examines the complex interplay between structural forms of oppression and agency by focusing on the ways sharecropping, tenant and landowning farmers in Texas utilized dress to negotiate racism, sexual exploitation, and exploitive capitalism.

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat with Allan deSouza: How Art Can Be Thought: A Handbook for Change

Lecture | January 30 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

What terms do we use to describe and evaluate art? How do we judge if art is good, and if it is for the social good? DeSouza investigates the terminology through which art is discussed, valued, and taught.

How to Write a Research Proposal Workshop

Workshop | January 30 | 3-4 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll, Haas Scholars Program Manager/Advisor, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Need to write a grant proposal? This workshop is for you! You'll get a head start on defining your research question, developing a lit review and project plan, presenting your qualifications, and creating a realistic budget.

Open to all UC Berkeley students.

Thursday, January 31, 2019

Far From Sanctuary: African American Travel in Twentieth Century America

Colloquium | January 31 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Allyson Hobbs, Stanford University

 Department of History

This talk takes mobility as its central theme and calls for a reconsideration of the automobile and its iconic role in American culture. How might the social and cultural meanings of travel and the car change once removed from their mythic place in Americana and placed in the context of African American life? The car and the ability to travel are emblematic of freedom and autonomy. What might...   More >

Friday, February 1, 2019

The Devil Really is in the Details: Why Specificity Matters in Understanding the Global Radical Right

Lecture | February 1 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues), Wildavsky Conference Room

 Brian Porter-Szűcs, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of History, University of Michigan

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Center for Right-Wing Studies

There are obvious similarities between Vladimir Putin, Viktor Orbán, Recep Erdoğan, Jair Bolsonaro, Jarosław Kaczyński, Rodrigo Duterte, Donald Trump, and all the other politicians we have come to call ‘populists.’ Not only is that label misleading, but analyzing them as part of a single ideological movement can lead to confusion. This presentation will use the example of Poland to...   More >

Dynasties and Democracy in Japan

Colloquium | February 1 | 4 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Daniel M. Smith, Associate Professor, Harvard University

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS)

Political dynasties exist in all democracies, but have been conspicuously prevalent in Japan, where over a third of legislators and two-thirds of cabinet ministers come from families with a history in parliament. In his new book, Dynasties and Democracy: The Inherited Incumbency Advantage in Japan, Daniel M. Smith introduces a comparative theory to explain the persistence of dynastic...   More >

Monday, February 4, 2019

The Cutting Edge: Theory and the Avant-Garde in Ljubljana

Lecture | February 4 | 4-6 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Kaitlyn Tucker, Humanities Teaching Fellow, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Chicago

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

This talk examines the historical relationship between the Ljubljana School and the avant-garde. Beginning in 1967 with Slavoj Zizek’s and Rastko Mocnik’s first forays into concrete poetry and concluding with the School’s involvement in the Neue Slowenische Kunst movement during the 1980s, the talk analyzes the Ljubljana School's engagement with avant-garde aesthetics, and ultimately...   More >

Tuesday, February 5, 2019

Political Economy of Reforms in Europe’s Neighborhood

Lecture | February 5 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220

 Sergei Guriev, Chief Economist, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Continuing economic convergence in Europe’s neighborhood requires further structural reforms. We will discuss the political economy of reforms in specific transition countries including Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Uzbekistan.

Wednesday, February 6, 2019

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat with Michael Nylan: The Chinese Pleasure Book

Lecture | February 6 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Nylan explores the concept of “pleasure”—including both short-term delight and longer-term satisfaction—as understood by major thinkers of ancient China.

Pan-Africanism - A History

Colloquium | February 6 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Hakim Adi, Professor of the History of Africa & the African Diaspora, University of Chichester

 Center for African Studies, Department of African American Studies

Professor Hakim Adi will introduce his latest book, Pan-Africanism – A History, in which he provides a history of the individuals and organizations that have sought the unity of all those of African origin as the basis for advancement and liberation.

Thursday, February 7, 2019

How to Write a Research Proposal Workshop

Workshop | February 7 | 2-3 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall

 Leah Carroll, Haas Scholars Program Manager/Advisor, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Need to write a grant proposal? This workshop is for you! You'll get a head start on defining your research question, developing a lit review and project plan, presenting your qualifications, and creating a realistic budget.

Open to all UC Berkeley students.

Shoroon Bumbagar: Tombs with Mounds in Central Mongolia

Lecture | February 7 | 4 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Nancy S. Steinhardt 
, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Pennsylvania

 Patricia Berger, History of Art, UC Berkeley, Emerita

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative

The talk begins with a tomb often known as Shoroon Bumbagar that was excavated in Bayannuur, Bulgan province, Mongolia, in 2011. Covered with murals but without an inscription or other information about its date, the tomb is studied alongside the better known tombs such as Pugu Yitu’s (d. 678), only five kms away, and tombs of Tang China and Sogdiana. Before drawing conclusions, the talk turns...   More >

Kamala Visweswaran | Deep Impunity

Lecture | February 7 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Kamala Visweswaran, Professor in Ethnic Studies, UCSD

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by cultural anthropologist Kamala Visweswaran, Professor in Ethnic Studies, UCSD.

Settlement, Culture, Identity in the Pale of Pylos: Sather Lecture Series: A Bronze Age Greek State in Formation

Lecture | February 7 | 8 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maud Fife Room (315 Wheeler Hall)

 Jack L. Davis, Blegen Professor of Greek Archaeology, University of Cincinnati

 Department of Classics

Internationally recognized scholar of Bronze Age Greece offers a series of lectures showing how the archaeological record sheds light on culture and communal life of early Greece.

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

Rebounding Malaria and the Ethics of Eradication: The WHO Campaign in Zanzibar, c. 1968 and Contemporary Implications

Colloquium | February 13 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Melissa Graboyes, Assisant Professor, University Clark Honors College, University of Oregonof Chichester

 Center for African Studies

This paper chronicles the history of malaria elimination attempts in Zanzibar, taking a close look at the World Health Organization’s failed elimination attempt between 1958-1968, and the epidemic of rebound malaria that struck the island afterwards.

Melissa Graboyes

The Chosen Ones

Colloquium | February 13 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, 117, Academic Innovation Studio | Note change in date

 Nikki Jones, Associate Professor of African American Studies, UC Berkeley

 Clarence Ford, Masters Candidate, Goldman School of Public Policy, UC Berkeley

 Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, Center for the Study of Law and Society, American Cultures, Berkeley Underground Scholars

The discussion will be based on Dr. Jones's new book, The Chosen Ones: Black Men and the Politics of Redemption, as centers around the topic of the struggles faced by formerly incarcerated black men trying to fit back into their communities and the obstacles they face when attempting to integrate into greater society.

Thursday, February 14, 2019

Farm and Field: Sather Lecture Series: A Bronze Age Greek State in Formation

Lecture | February 14 | 5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Jack L. Davis, Blegen Professor of Greek Archaeology, University of Cincinnati

 Department of Classics

Internationally recognized scholar of Bronze Age Greece offers a series of lectures showing how the archaeological record sheds light on culture and communal life of early Greece.

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Faiz Ahmed | Afghanistan Rising: Islamic Law and Statecraft between the Ottoman and British Empires

Lecture | February 19 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Faiz Ahmed, Associate Professor of History, Brown University

 Wali Ahmadi, Associate Professor of Persian Literature, Dept. of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, The Berkeley Urdu Initiative, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative

A talk by Assistant Professor of History at Brown University, Dr. Faiz Ahmed on his new book, Afghanistan Rising: Islamic Law and Statecraft between the Ottoman and British Empires.

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat with Diego Pirillo: The Refugee-Diplomat: Venice, England, and the Reformation

Lecture | February 20 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Pirillo offers a new history of early modern diplomacy, centered on Italian religious refugees who left Italy in order to forge ties with English and northern European Protestants in the hope of inspiring an Italian Reformation.

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Bancroft Library Roundtable: Migrants in the Making: Invisible Agricultural Child Labor and the Limits of Citizenship, 1938-1965

Lecture | February 21 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Ivón Padilla-Rodríguez, PhD candidate in History at Columbia University and Visiting Dissertation Research Scholar at the UC Berkeley Latinx Research Center

 Bancroft Library

Farm work is the most hazardous industry for young workers. Yet, despite the implementation of a national child labor ban in 1938, Latinx children continue to toil in fields nationwide with an estimated 200,000-500,000 agricultural child laborers employed each year. Ivón Padilla-Rodríguez has identified the child labor ban's agricultural exemption as the reason for this disjuncture.

 The Lewis-Latimer Room has a maximum capacity of 28 people. The doors will be shut and no more attendees may enter once the room is at capacity.

It’s not a NATURAL disaster: looking from past to future through archaeology

Lecture | February 21 | 4:30-6:30 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Margaret Nelson, Professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change and Distinguished Sustainability Scholar in the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability, Arizona State University

 Archaeological Research Facility

In this talk, Nelson looks at rare climate challenges and human-created vulnerabilities in the long-term history/prehistory of seven areas and evaluates the magnitude of changes to food security and social conditions following extreme climate events. Results of these analyses support the role of human-created vulnerabilities in the occurrence of “disasters” associated with climate extremes.

A Truly Prehistoric Archaeology: Sather Lecture Series: A Bronze Age Greek State in Formation

Lecture | February 21 | 5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Jack L. Davis, Blegen Professor of Greek Archaeology, University of Cincinnati

 Department of Classics

Internationally recognized scholar of Bronze Age Greece offers a series of lectures showing how the archaeological record sheds light on culture and communal life of early Greece.

Friday, February 22, 2019

Theology and the Public University

Conference/Symposium | February 22 – 23, 2019 every day |  UC Berkeley Campus | Note change in date

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

For the past two years, the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, supported by the Henry Luce Foundation, has convened a series of workshops and seminars concerning, broadly speaking, the place of theology in the university. From the outset, our goal was to challenge narrow conceptions of both secular learning and “theology,” in hopes of fostering robust conversation about the teaching of...   More >

Points of Transition: Ovoo and the Ritual Remaking of Religious, Ecological, and Historical Politics in Inner Asia

Conference/Symposium | February 22 | 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Townsend Center for the Humanities

Ovoo, the structures of stones, trees, scarves, skulls, steering wheel covers, and a staggering array of other objects that are ubiquitous across the landscape of contemporary Mongolia, Buryatia, Inner Mongolia, and Qinghai, have long marked sites where ritual, though often highly spontaneous, practices invoke the presence of immanent relations. Built and maintained by various publics, gatherings...   More >

Saturday, February 23, 2019

Theology and the Public University

Conference/Symposium | February 22 – 23, 2019 every day |  UC Berkeley Campus | Note change in date

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

For the past two years, the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, supported by the Henry Luce Foundation, has convened a series of workshops and seminars concerning, broadly speaking, the place of theology in the university. From the outset, our goal was to challenge narrow conceptions of both secular learning and “theology,” in hopes of fostering robust conversation about the teaching of...   More >

A UCBHSSP Un-Conference

Workshop | February 23 | 9 a.m.-1 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project

UCBHSSP invites Bay Area educators to participate in an "un-conference." This participate-driven event will allow teachers to share and learn from one another with regard to how they are approaching history instruction at this historical moment - What does this moment demand of us as history teachers?

 This event is directed at educators.

Monday, February 25, 2019

Kalunga: Kongo Thought in Africa and the Americas

Lecture | February 25 | 4-6 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife room

 Ned Sublette

 Department of English

American Sutra: Buddhism and the Incarceration of Japanese Americans during WWII

Colloquium | February 25 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Duncan Ryūken Williams, Professor of Religion and East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Southern California

 Mark Blum, Professor, Shinjo Ito Distinguished Chair in Japanese Studies, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley; Carolyn Chen, Associate Professor, Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies, UC Berkeley

 Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, Department of Ethnic Studies, Center for Buddhist Studies

Duncan Ryūken Williams (USC) will discuss his new book “American Sutra” about Buddhism and the WWII Japanese American internment. The fact that the vast majority of Japanese Americans were Buddhist was responsible for why nearly 120,000 persons of Japanese ancestry, two-third of whom were American citizens, were targeted for forcible removal from the Pacific coast states and incarcerated in...   More >

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Around Arthur Szyk: Berkeley Scholars on Art and History: Poland Reborn: A State Between Democracy and Fascism

Lecture: Featuring History Faculty | February 26 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

This talk focuses on the divided Poland that emerged after World War I. On the one hand Poland had to accommodate the demands of generations of freedom fighters, while on the other...   More >

 

  RSVP online or by calling 5106432526

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Race, Place, and Other Things for the Taking: The Buffalo Soldiers and Allensworth, California

Lecture | February 27 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Jarre Hamilton, Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

 Archaeological Research Facility

In 1908, Lieutenant Colonel Allen Allensworth (and chaplain to the 24th infantry regiment of the Buffalo Soldiers) founded the town of Allensworth, California. This talk will discuss the daily, lived experiences of both the civilian population and the enlisted military men who existed in these varying racialized landscapes and the archaeological material culture they have left behind.

Townsend Center Una's Lecture with Maggie Nelson: Songs of Care and Constraint

Lecture | February 27 | 5 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maude Fife Room, 315 Wheeler Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Maggie Nelson, a 2016 MacArthur Fellow, is the author of numerous works of nonfiction and poetry, including The Argonauts, an autobiographical account that received the National Book Critics Circle Award for criticism. Her Una's Lecture is titled "Songs of Care and Constraint."

Photo of Maggie Nelson

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Public University, Public Values

Lecture | February 28 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220

 Maggie Nelson, Professor of English, University of Southern California

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Public University, Public Values is a new series of talks and conversations co-organized by BCSR and the Townsend Center for the Humanities. The series is prompted by the recognition that the current moment of crisis in the liberal democracies of Europe and North America is, among other things, a crisis of value. The “political” focus that has shaped the humanities and much of the social...   More >

Sadia Saeed | Politics of Desecularization: Law and the Minority Question in Pakistan

Lecture | February 28 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Sadia Saeed, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, University of San Francisco

 Munis D. Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & South East Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative

Talk by Sociologist Sadia Saeed on her new book that examines how the contentious relationship between Islam, nationalism, and rights of religious minorities has been debated and institutionalized in colonial India and Pakistan.

Speaker Bio
Sadia Saeed is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the...   More >

Preserving and Conserving Nestor: Sather Lecture Series: A Bronze Age Greek State in Formation

Lecture | February 28 | 5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Jack L. Davis, Blegen Professor of Greek Archaeology, University of Cincinnati

 Department of Classics

Internationally recognized scholar of Bronze Age Greece offers a series of lectures showing how the archaeological record sheds light on culture and communal life of early Greece.

Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Displaying International Communism: The Exhibition of Socialist Countries (Moscow, 1958)

Lecture | March 5 | 5:15-6:45 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Matteo Bertelé, Marie Skłodowska-Curie Global Fellow at the University of California Santa Barbara, Universität Hamburg and Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Ca’ Foscari University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

The Exhibition of Socialist Countries, held in the Moscow Manege in 1958, was the first large exhibition ever organized in the socialist hemisphere, with more than two thousand artworks from twelve East-European and Asian countries. Conceived as a socialist response to the Venice Biennale - branded as the main international showcase for “decadent and bourgeois art from capitalist nations” - the...   More >

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat with Joyce Carol Oates: Hazards of Time Travel

Lecture | March 6 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Oates’s latest novel is the dystopian story of a young woman living in a bleak future dictatorship, who is punished for her transgressions by being sent back in time.

AIA Lecture

Lecture | March 6 | 7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 San Francisco Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

Thursday, March 7, 2019

European Economic Integration and Populism: Foes or Allies?

Lecture | March 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Dariusz Adamski, University of Wrocław

 Institute of European Studies, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Could it be that one of the most extraordinary experiments in international reconciliation and community-building in the history of mankind – European integration after World War II – has contributed to what European Commission President Juncker once dubbed “galloping populism”? Seeking an answer to this question, Dariusz Adamski will dissect the nature of the major economic policies of the...   More >

Dariusz Adamski

Hegemonies of Language and Their Discontents: The Southwest North American Region Since 1540

Colloquium | March 7 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues), Wildavsky Conference Room

 Carlos G. Vélez-Ibáñez, ASU Regents' Professor; Presidential Motorola Professor of Neighborhood Revitalization; Founding Director Emeritus, School of Transborder Studies; Professor, School of Human Evolution and Social Change; Emeritus Professor of Anthropology of the University, University of Arizona

 Center for Native American Issues Research on

Spanish and English have fought a centuries-long battle for dominance in the Southwest North American Region, commonly known as the U.S.-Mexico transborder region. Covering the time period of 1540 to the present, the book provides a deep and broad understanding of the contradictory methods of establishing language supremacy and details the linguistic and cultural processes used by penetrating...   More >

Critical Public Theology: How to Use and Not to Use the Bible in Contemporary Public Issues

Lecture | March 7 | 5-7 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall | Note change in location

 Konrad Schmid, Professor of Old Testament Science and Early Jewish Religious History, University of Zürich

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

The Bible sometimes plays a major role in current, political discourses, especially in the United States. As a project, public theology supports efforts to let the Bible speak to contemporary, public concerns. But using the Bible in this way involves many potential traps. How can a 2000 year old book provide guidance for social and political challenges? Should it do so at all? This lecture argues...   More >

Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Dockworker Power: Race and Activism in Durban and the San Francisco Bay Area

Presentation: History Department Events | March 12 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Dr. Peter Cole

 American Cultures

Dr. Peter Cole discusses his highly anticipated book - Dockworker Power. Often missed in commentary on today's globalizing economy, workers in the world’s ports can harness their role, at a strategic choke point, to promote their labor rights and social justice causes. Cole brings such overlooked experiences to light in an eye-opening comparative study of Durban, South Africa, and the San...   More >

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat with Anthony Long: How to Be Free: An Ancient Guide to the Stoic Life

Lecture | March 13 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Born a slave, the ancient Roman Stoic philosopher Epictetus taught that mental freedom is supreme, since it can liberate one anywhere, even in a prison. Long presents a new edition of Epictetus’s famed handbook on Stoicism.

What’s Theology Got to Do with It? An Eighteenth-Century Chinese Emperor Debating Religions and Christianity

Lecture | March 13 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Eugenio Menegon, Associate Professor of Chinese History, Boston University; Collaborative Scholar, Institute for Advanced Jesuit Studies, Boston College

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

In his Lettres chinoises, indiennes et tartares, Voltaire republished “a note by the good Kangxi Emperor to the Peking Jesuits” as follows: “The emperor is surprised to see you so stubborn in your ideas. Why would you worry so much about a world where you have not been yet? Enjoy the present. Your God must be pained by your preoccupations...   More >

To the Academy: A Lecture-Demonstration by Third Space Performance Lab

Performing Arts - Theater | March 13 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Bancroft Studio (2401 Bancroft)

 Shanti Pillai; Marc Gomes, Third Space Performance Lab

 Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies, Asian American Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies, Institute of International Studies Faculty Working Group on Gender and the Transpacific

Two performers of unusual talents rehearse how they will delight and confound a group of earnest scholars. Intent on conjuring the colonial object of inquiry who refuses to cooperate and the privileged angst of the postcolonial, diasporic intellectual, the performers grapple—literally—with the gendered, raced, and sexual assumptions that construct knowledge. Multiple performance codes intersect...   More >

Thursday, March 14, 2019

Priya Moorjani | Reconstructing South Asian Population History using Genetic Data

Lecture | March 14 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Priya Moorjani, Assistant Professor, Department of Molecular & Cell Biology, UC Berkeley

 Munis D. Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & South East Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Center for Computational Biology, Population Center, Population Science, Department of Demography

Talk by molecular biologist and geneticist, Professor Priya Moorjani.

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Around Arthur Szyk: Berkeley Scholars on Art and History: Visual Judaica: Jewish Icons and Collecting Patterns in the early 20th century

Lecture | March 19 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

The highly decorative works of Arthur Szyk contain key Jewish visual elements such as the Lion of Judah, the dove, and the seven spices mentioned in the bible as typical of the Land of Israel. These themes are repeated in Szyk’s oeuvre throughout his life and can be found in his early pieces ("Book of Esther," 1925) as well as in later ones ("Pathways Through the Bible," 1946). In this talk, we...   More >

 

  RSVP online or by calling 5106432526

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat with Mary Ann Smart: Waiting for Verdi: Opera and Political Opinion in Nineteenth-Century Italy, 1815-1848

Lecture | March 20 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Smart explores how nineteenth-century Italian opera sparked political change by making the newly engaged spectator in the opera house into an actor on the political stage.

Monday, April 1, 2019

Lecture by Shirley Thompson: Title TBA

Lecture | April 1 | 3-5:15 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife room

 Shirley Thompson, Associate Professor, Department of American Studies, UT Austin

 Department of English

Tuesday, April 2, 2019

Jorge Flores | Unwanted Neighbors: The Mughals, the Portuguese, and their Frontier Zones

Lecture | April 2 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Jorge Flores, Professor of Early Modern Global History, Department of History and Civilization, European University Institute, Florence

 Munis D. Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & South East Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

In December 1572 the Mughal emperor Akbar arrived in the port city of Khambayat. Having been raised in distant Kabul, Akbar had never in his thirty years been to the Ocean. Presumably anxious with the news about the Mughal military campaign in Gujarat, several Portuguese merchants in Khambayat rushed to Akbar’s presence. This encounter marked the beginning of a long, complex, and unequal...   More >

Wednesday, April 3, 2019

Diverging destinies? Changing family structures and inequality of opportunity in the United States: A Brown Bag Talk

Colloquium | April 3 | 12-1 p.m. | 2232 Piedmont, Seminar Room

 Diederik Boertien, Researcher, Centre for Demographic Studies, University of Barcelona

 Population Science, Department of Demography

A lunch time talk and discussion session, featuring visiting and local scholars presenting their research on a wide range of topics of interest to demography.

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Berkeley Lecture on Religious Tolerance

Lecture | April 10 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220

 Jan Assman, Professor Emeritus, Egyptology Institute, University of Heidelberg and the Department of History and Sociology, University of Konstanz

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Lecture details are forthcoming.

Jan Assman is Professor Emeritus, Egyptology Institute, University of Heidelberg and the Department of History and Sociology, University of Konstanz. His English-language books include Moses the Egyptian (1997), The Search for God in Ancient Egypt (2002), Death and Salvation in Ancient Egypt (2006), and The Price of Monotheism...   More >

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat with Timothy Hampton: Bob Dylan's Poetics: How the Songs Work

Lecture | April 17 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Hampton’s close examination of Bob Dylan's songs locates the artist’s transgressive style within a long history of modern (and modernist) art.

Thursday, April 18, 2019

Bancroft Library Roundtable: Cherokees and Choctaws Among the Miwok and Yokuts: Legacies of Cultural Blending and Intertribal Relations in Nineteenth Century California

Lecture | April 18 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Andrew Shaler, PhD candidate in History, UC Riverside

 Bancroft Library

The California Gold Rush is remembered for the thousands of immigrants who traversed continents and oceans for a chance to gain quick wealth. Lost in these narratives are the rich histories of Native American emigrants who made the same journey to California’s Gold Country beginning in 1849. Andrew Shaler considers the legacies of these Native emigrants.

 The Lewis-Latimer Room has a maximum capacity of 28 people. The doors will be shut and no more attendees may enter once the room is at capacity.

Diversity and Power in Global Christian Communities

Lecture | April 18 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender

Candace Lukasik, PhD Candidate in Anthropology

Hannah Waits, PhD Candidate in American History

Thursday, April 25, 2019

"Doing" Political Theology Today: Promises and Pitfalls

Lecture | April 25 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Ruth Marshall, Associate Professor of Religion & Political Science, University of Toronto

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Lecture details forthcoming.

Ruth Marshall received her DPhil in Politics from Oxford University, and joined both the Department for the Study of Religion and Political Science in 2008, after having spent 8 years living and researching in West Africa. She is the author of Political Spiritualities: The Pentecostal Revolution in Nigeria (U. Chicago Press, 2009) and numerous scholarly...   More >

Monday, April 29, 2019

New Archaeology Discoveries in Asia: Book Launch for "Handbook of East and Southeast Asian Archaeology"

Panel Discussion | April 29 | 3-5 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Peter V. Lape, Professor of Anthropology, University of Washington; John W. Olsen, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Arizona

 Junko Habu, Professor of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Center for Korean Studies (CKS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

This event celebrates the publication of the "Handbook of East and Southeast Asian Archaeology" with two editors of this volume, both of whom are prominent scholars in the field of Asian archaeology: Prof. John W. Olsen (University of Arizona) and Prof. Peter V. Lape (University of Washington).

Thursday, May 2, 2019

Khursheed Mahmood Kasuri | Pakistan-India Relations: The Way Forward

Lecture | May 2 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Khurshid Mahmud Kasuri, Pakistani politician, Writer, & (former) Minister of Foreign Affairs of Pakistan

 Munis D. Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & South East Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative, Pakistan America Institute

Talk by Khursheed Mahmood Kasuri, former foreign minister for Pakistan and author of "Neither a Hawk Nor a Dove: An insider's account of Pakistan's Foreign Policy."

Thursday, May 16, 2019

Bancroft Library Roundtable: "Loans for the Little Fellow": Credit, Crisis, and Recovery in the Great Depression

Lecture | May 16 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Sarah Quincy, PhD candidate in Economics at UC Davis

 Bancroft Library

Both lauded as “the great bank of the West” and reviled as a “huge financial octopus,” the Bank of America introduced several modern banking practices during the Great Depression, which played an integral role in California’s development. Sarah Quincy will discuss her research on the impacts of this unusual bank on the state’s economy during the 1920s and 1930s.

 The Lewis-Latimer Room has a maximum capacity of 28 people. The doors will be shut and no more attendees may enter once the room is at capacity.

Ongoing Events

Facing West 1: Camera Portraits from the Bancroft Collection

Exhibit - Photography | November 9, 2018 – March 15, 2019 every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. |  Bancroft Library

 Bancroft Library

The first part of a double exhibition celebrating the tenth anniversary of the renewed Bancroft Library and its gallery, Facing West 1 presents a cavalcade of individuals who made, and continue to make, California and the American West. These camera portraits highlight the communities and peoples of Hubert Howe Bancroft’s original collecting region, which extended from the Rockies to the Pacific...   More >

Pièces de Résistance: Echoes of Judaea Capta From Ancient Coins to Modern Art

Exhibit - Multimedia | January 29 – June 28, 2019 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

This exhibition will be continuing in Spring 2019.

Notions of resistance, alongside fears and realities of oppression, resound throughout Jewish history. As a minority, Jews express their political aspirations, ideals of heroism, and yearnings of retaliation and redemption in their rituals, art, and everyday life.

Centering on coins in The Magnes Collection, this exhibition explores how...   More >

Project “Holy Land”: Yaakov Benor-Kalter’s Photographs of British Mandate Palestine, 1923-1940

Exhibit - Photography | January 29 – June 28, 2019 every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 11 a.m.-4:05 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

For nearly two decades, Yaakov (Jacob) Benor-Kalter (1897-1969) traversed the Old City of Jerusalem, documenting renowned historical monuments, ambiguous subjects in familiar alleyways, and scores of “new Jews” building a new homeland. Benor-Kalter’s photographs smoothly oscillate between two worlds, and two Holy Lands, with one lens.

After immigrating from Poland to the British Mandate of...   More >

The Daphne Muse Letters Collection: Correspondence Documenting Black History and Culture across the Diaspora (1898-2019)

Exhibit - Artifacts | January 31 | 4-6 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife room

340185 Daphne Muse Speaker - Featured https://www.facebook.com/msmusewriter

 English, Department of, African American Studies, Department of, UC Berkeley History Social Science Project

Daphne Muse is a Bay Area writer, poet, and cultural broker. Her collection of more than 3700 handwritten and typed letters dating back to 1898 resounds with the voices of activists, writers, artists, actors, world leaders, and media innovators who shaped movements, created new artistic visions, and drove the intellectual, philosophical and cultural discourse for civil rights, human rights and...   More >