Skip to main content.
Advanced search >
<< Back to previous page Print

<< Wednesday, April 24, 2019 >>


Remind me

Tell a friend

Add to my Google calendar (bCal)

Download to my calendar

Bookmark and ShareShare


Evoking Sympathy for the Muslim Woman Post 9/11

Lecture | April 24 | 12-2 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall


Evelyn Alsultany, Associate Professor of American Culture, Arab and Muslim American Studies Program Co-Founder and Director, University of Michigan

Department of Gender and Women's Studies


'Feminist Studies and Visual Media' Spring 2019 Gender and Women’s Studies Lecture series
Cosponsored by Media Studies and Center for Race and Gender
Organized and Moderated by Professor Minoo Moallem

This talk examines representations of Muslim women in the U.S. news media post-9/11/01, focusing on how Muslim women became sites of public sympathy and moral outrage. It argues that the logics central to the War on Terror are not possible without their accompanying affects, showing how Muslim women are designated as worthy of feeling while Muslim men are not. In particular, it examines how journalists use disclaimers in their news stories about Islam and oppression in an effort to appear as if they are not stereotyping. These disclaimers, paired with the experience of outrage that media viewers and readers experience at the injustice “Muslim women” face participate in justifying the mistreatment of Muslim men and Muslim communities. Event co-sponsored by the Center For Middle Eastern Studies and funded by Chau Hoi Shuen Foundation Fund in Gender and Women's Studies.

Bio: Evelyn Alsultany is Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and Associate Professor of American Culture at the University of Michigan where she co-founded and directs the Arab and Muslim American Studies program. Alsultany is the author of Arabs and Muslims in the Media: Race and Representation after 9/11 (New York University Press, 2012); co-editor of Arab and Arab American Feminisms: Gender, Violence, and Belonging (Syracuse University Press, 2011); and of “Between the Middle East and the Americas: The Cultural Politics of Diaspora” (University of Michigan Press, 2013). She is the guest curator of the Arab American National Museum’s online exhibit, Reclaiming Identity: Dismantling Arab Stereotypes (www.arabstereotypes.org). In 2017, she collaborated with colleagues at other universities to create the #IslamophobiaIsRacism Online Syllabus. She is currently working on a new book project entitled, “Stealth Anti-Muslim Racism in an Age of Islamophobia.”

Funding provided by the Chau Hoi Shuen Foundation Fund in Gender and Women's Studies


gilliane@berkeley.edu