Seminars & Events

<< February 2019 >>

Friday, February 1, 2019

Magnetism in Amorphous Alloys: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | February 1 | 2-3 p.m. | 4 LeConte Hall

 Prof. Frances Hellman, UC Berkeley, Physics & MSE

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

Most condensed matter textbooks start by introducing crystal symmetries and the periodic lattice as foundational to the field. Yet, it has long been known that the amorphous structure supports ferromagnetism, superconductivity, and a host of other condensed matter properties.

Superconductivity theory was famously expanded from the original Bloch wave pairing to be described as pairing of...   More >

Chemical Tools for Investigating Reactive Sulfur Species

Seminar: Inorganic Chemistry | February 1 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Michael Pluth, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oregon

 College of Chemistry

Reactive sulfur species, such as H2S and sulfane-sulfur compounds, play key roles in different (patho)physiological processes. In addition, these small molecules are also key targets for new donor motifs that function both as important research tools and pharmacological agents. Aligned with this importance, our lab has recently developed a palette of new donor motifs, including H2S- and...   More >

Monday, February 4, 2019

Dare to Repair: From DNA Chemistry to Cancer and back again

Seminar: Structural & Quantitative Biology | February 4 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Sheila David, University of California, Davis

 College of Chemistry

Tuesday, February 5, 2019

Clayton Heathcock Lectureship: Studies Related to the ATP-Adenosine Pathway

Seminar: Organic Chemistry | February 5 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Terry Rosen, Arcus Biosciences

 College of Chemistry

Tumor cell death induced by hypoxia or chemotherapy releases large amounts of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) into the extracellular environment. ATP is rapidly converted to AMP (adenosine monophosphate) which, in turn, is converted by hypoxia-induced CD73 into adenosine (ADO). ADO suppresses immune responses, including those of T cells, NK cells and dendritic cells through activation of adenosine...   More >

Single Molecule Probes and Single Particles Probed

Seminar: Physical Chemistry | February 5 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Laura Kaufman, Department of Chemistry, Columbia University

 College of Chemistry

I will describe two projects in which we characterize complex systems – supercooled liquids and conjugated polymer aggregates – through single molecule or single particle fluorescence imaging. First, in supercooled liquids – systems that display behaviors consistent with the presence of heterogeneous dynamics – we investigate the time scales over which heterogeneities persist using “ideal” single...   More >

Simon-Kucher Partners Infosession: Careers in consulting

Information Session | February 5 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Betty Pio, Simon-Kucher & Partners

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Want to learn more about consulting?
Our Life Sciences Partners will be on campus to discuss projects they have worked on and to answer any questions you might have about a career in consulting.

Food provided and resumes accepted!

• Simon-Kucher is regarded as the world’s leading pricing advisor and thought leader.
• Life Sciences is one of our leading industry practices; we have advised...   More >

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Wednesday, February 6, 2019

Experimental design in an oligonucleotide synthesis factory using numerical simulations in Python and pandas

Seminar | February 6 | 1:30-2:45 p.m. | 775A Tan Hall

 Aaron Wiegel, Data Scientist, Synthego

 Department of Chemistry

Abstract: Regardless of the application, calculating a particular statistic and associated p-value is not necessarily the biggest challenge in designing an experiment, especially given the availability of open source software packages such as scipy and statsmodels in Python. Instead, ensuring that the assumptions required for a statistical test are actually satisfied by the data is far more...   More >

Encapsulation of metal nanoparticles within microporous zeotypes via hydrothermal synthesis in the presence of ligand-protected metal cations

Colloquium: Chem. & Biomol. Engineering Colloquium | February 6 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Tan Hall

 Trenton Otto, Ph.D. student in the Iglesia Group

 Department of Chemical Engineering

Thursday, February 7, 2019

Graduate Research Seminar

Seminar: Graduate Research Seminar | February 7 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall

 Ms. Audrey Reeves, Graduate Student for Professor Christopher Chang, www.cchem.berkeley.edu/cjcgrp/

 Department of Chemistry

Coffee served @10:50am at the Coffee Lab

Graduate Research Seminar

Seminar: Graduate Research Seminar | February 7 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall

 Mr. Banruo Huang, Graduate Student for Professor Dean Toste, www.cchem.berkeley.edu/toste/

 Department of Chemistry

Coffee served @10:50am at the Coffee Lab

Friday, February 8, 2019

Discrete Microfluidics for More Efficient Pharmaceutical Compound Testing: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | February 8 | 2-3 p.m. | 4 LeConte Hall

 Prof. Melinda Simon, San Jose State University, Biomedical Engineering

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

In 2012, the declining efficiency and increasing cost of pharmaceutical research was noted in a phenomenon termed “Eroom’s law”, to distinguish it from the efficiency of “Moore’s law” in transistor development.

Though the reasons for this phenomenon are myriad and varied, the efficiency of drug development and commercialization could be greatly improved by the development of better paradigms...   More >

Neil Bartlett Lectureship: The close and loose relationship between Carbon and Phosphorus

Seminar: Inorganic Chemistry | February 8 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Manfred Scheer, Institute of Organic Chemistry, Universitat Regensburg

 College of Chemistry

Polyphosphorus units are an important class of compound and isolobal to carbon-based relatives. Because of the lone pairs at the phosphorus atoms, the five-fold symmetric cyclo-P5 ring of the pentaphosphaferrocenes [CpRFe(η5-P5)] enables the use of these complexes in unique supramolecular aggregations with Lewis acidic transition metal moieties to form unprecedented giant spherical molecules...   More >

Monday, February 11, 2019

Berkeley Lectures in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering presented by The Dow Chemical Company: Traditional Fluid Flow Configurations: Unexpected Responses

Lecture: Chem. & Biomol. Engineering Colloquium: Special Seminar | February 11 | 4-6 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Howard Stone, Professor, Princeton University

 Department of Chemical Engineering

The flows of complex fluids link fundamental research questions to potential applications, both in industry and for understanding natural phenomena. In this talk I discuss two research questions that we have studied recently: (1) Although flows at modest Reynolds numbers at a T-shaped junction is a geometry where one should expect everything is known, nevertheless we uncover previously...   More >

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Student Hosted Colloquium in Physical Chemistry: Computational Vibrational Spectroscopy of Aqueous Acid and Base Solutions

Seminar: Physical Chemistry | February 12 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Steve Corcelli, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame

 College of Chemistry

The structure, dynamics, and transport properties of electrolyte solutions, including acids and bases, is critically important to aqueous solution chemistry. Aqueous acid and base solutions have vibrational spectra with distinct continua that span from about 1000 cm-1 to 3000 cm-1. Despite intense study, the interpretation of the spectra in terms of the molecular structure of the hydrated proton...   More >

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

Cell mechanics by atomic force, traction force, and ion conductance microscopy

Seminar | February 13 | 12-1 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall | Note change in date

 Tilman Schaeffer, University of Tubingen (Germany)

 Bioengineering (BioE)

I will present the development and application of novel scanning probe instrumentation and methods in the field of cell mechanics.

Using force clamp force mapping (FCFM), an atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging mode that combines force-distance curves with an added force clamp phase, we observed that the creep behavior of living cells conforms to a power-law material model. When comparing...   More >

Berkeley Lectures in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering presented by The Dow Chemical Company: Seeking Intersections Between Disciplines: “Boundaries” in Multiphase Flows

Lecture: Chem. & Biomol. Engineering Colloquium: Special Seminar | February 13 | 4-6 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Howard Stone, Professor, Princeton University

 Department of Chemical Engineering

Fluid dynamics is a discipline with a long history, and has a distinctive feature that it links engineering, mathematics and physics, and provides many avenues for intersections with biology. In this talk I will provide one view of the ways that mechanics, and in particular fluid dynamics, yields insights into a wide variety of "multiphase" flow problems. The talk will begin with brief examples...   More >

Thursday, February 14, 2019

Graduate Research Seminar

Seminar: Graduate Research Seminar | February 14 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall

 Ms. Vanha Pham, Graduate Student for Professor Christopher Chang, www.cchem.berkeley.edu/cjcgrp/

 Department of Chemistry

Coffee served @10:50am at the Coffee Lab

Graduate Research Seminar

Seminar: Graduate Research Seminar | February 14 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall

 Mr. Stephen Bierschenk, Graduate Student for Professor Dean Toste, www.cchem.berkeley.edu/toste/

 Department of Chemistry

Coffee served @10:50am at the Coffee Lab

Muetterties Seminar: Supramolecular approaches to control selectivity in transition metal catalysis

Seminar: Organic Chemistry | February 14 | 4-5 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Joost Reek, Department of Chemistry, University of Amsterdam

 College of Chemistry

The interface between supramolecular chemistry and transition metal catalysis has received surprisingly little attention in contrast to the individual disciplines. It provides, however, novel and elegant strategies that lead to new tools for the search of effective catalysts, and as such this has been an important research theme in our laboratories. In this presentation I will focus
on...   More >

Friday, February 15, 2019

Muetterties Seminar: Catalysis in Confined Spaces: Ligand-Template strategies encapsulate transition metal complexes

Seminar: Inorganic Chemistry | February 15 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Joost Reek, Department of Chemistry, University of Amsterdam

 College of Chemistry

The encapsulation of homogeneous catalysts in molecular cages is of interest as activity, selectivity and stability can be controlled by the cage as second coordination sphere, reminiscent of how Enzymes control chemical reactivity. Homogeneous catalysts however, are not static guest molecules as catalysts change in shape, charge and polarity during the catalytic cycle, representing
the...   More >

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Amgen Seminar in Organic Chemistry: How structure can inform GPCR drug discovery

Seminar: Organic Chemistry | February 19 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall | Canceled

 Bryan Roth, Department of Pharmacology, UNC School of Medicine

 College of Chemistry

In this talk I will first present unpublished work highlighting our current structure-based efforts to understand how small molecules interact with G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). I will then show how these structural insights can facilitate GPCR drug discovery.

Recent papers: Wang et al, Science 2017 (PMID: 29051383); Wang et al, Nature 2018 (PMID: 29466326); Che et al, Cell 2018 (PMID:...   More >

Virtual Coffee Chat with Undergraduate Dean John Arnold

Meeting: Alumni event | February 19 | 12-1 p.m. |  Your home computer or phone

 John Arnold, Undergraduate Dean

 College of Chemistry

Please join our Undergraduate Dean John Arnold for a one-hour virtual Coffee Chat on Tuesday, February 19th at Noon PST to hear an update on Undergraduate Programs at the College.

Probing Both Ice and Multicomponent Interfaces

Seminar: Physical Chemistry | February 19 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Mary Jane Shultz, Department of Chemistry, Tufts University

 College of Chemistry

Soft interfaces such as ice or those containing multiple species are common in biology, the environment, and technological applications. Probing these, particularly when the interface is buried between two condensed phases presents many challenges. The only current method available to probe such interfaces with molecular specificity is the vibrational spectroscopy, sum frequency generation (SFG)....   More >

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Proteoforms in human health and disease

Seminar | February 20 | 12-1 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Neil Kelleher, Northwestern University

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Proteoforms are the specific molecular forms of proteins arising from human genes encoded in the human genome. They include all sources of protein variation, and here’s a list: sequence mutations, alternative splicing, and post-translational modifications (PTMs). They underlie diverse biological systems and proteoform diversity is directly linked to functions, pathway modulation, and disease...   More >

Electrokinetic Control of Interfacial Instabilities

Colloquium: Chem. & Biomol. Engineering Colloquium | February 20 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Tan Hall

 Martin Bazant, Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 Department of Chemical Engineering

This talk will describe three examples of interfacial patterns – viscous fingers, deionization shocks, and metal dendrites – whose stability can be controlled by electrokinetic phenomena in charged porous media, as evidenced by both theory and experiments. Potential applications include electrically enhanced oil recovery, water desalination and purification by shock electrodialysis, and energy...   More >

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Graduate Research Seminar

Seminar: Graduate Research Seminar | February 21 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall

 Ms. Maria Paley, Graduate Student for Professor Jeffrey Long, alchemy.cchem.berkeley.edu/group-members

 Department of Chemistry

Coffee served @10:50am at the Coffee Lab

Graduate Research Seminar

Seminar: Graduate Research Seminar | February 21 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall

 Mr. Joshua Turnbull, Graduate Student for Professor Evan Miller, https://mcb.berkeley.edu/faculty/bbs/millere.html

 Department of Chemistry

Coffee served @10:50am at the Coffee Lab

Graduate Research Conference

Seminar: Graduate Research Conference | February 21 | 4-5 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall

 Mr. DAS, AVISHEK, Graduate Student with Professor David Limmer, www.cchem.berkeley.edu/dtlgrp/

 Ms. TAN, JENNA, Graduate Student with Professor Naomi Ginsberg, www.cchem.berkeley.edu/nsggrp/

 Department of Chemistry

Coffee served @3:50pm at the Coffee Lab

Editing The Code Of Life: The Future Of Genome Editing

Lecture | February 21 | 5-6:30 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Dr. Jennifer Doudna

 Institute of International Studies

Our technological capacity to make changes to genomic data has expanded exponentially since the 2012 discovery of CRISPR-Cas9 as an RNA-programmable genome editing tool. Over the past seven years, this genome editing platform has been used to revolutionize research, develop new agricultural crops, and even promises to cure genetic diseases. However, ethical and societal concerns abound, requiring...   More >

Friday, February 22, 2019

Interfacial Engineering of Lithium Metal Anodes: From Liquid to Solid Electrolytes: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | February 22 | 2-3 p.m. | 4 LeConte Hall

 Prof. Neil Dasgupta, Univ. of Michigan, Mechanical Engineering

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

The poor performance and safety concerns of lithium (Li) metal anodes represent a critical challenge to enable high energy density rechargeable batteries. This is attributed to several well-known issues associated with Li metal electrodeposition and dissolution, including electrolyte decomposition, dendrite evolution, and “dead” Li accumulation. In addition, short-circuiting can occur due to the...   More >

Leveraging Polarizability and Electrophilicity in Catalysts for Challenging Coupling Reactions

Seminar: Inorganic Chemistry | February 22 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Brad Carrow, Department of Chemistry, Princeton University

 College of Chemistry

A general approach by our group for the development of new catalytic synthetic methods that occur with higher efficiency and selectivity, use simpler reagents, and proceed with lower energy demand involves new ancillary ligand design coupled with fundamental studies of how metal-ligand bonding dictates catalytic reactivity. In this context, the presentation will focus on our recent efforts to...   More >

Grounds for Science -Getting the most out of light: vision and geoengineering

Lecture | February 22 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Scarlet City Espresso Bar

 3960Espresso Bar Adeline Street, Emeryville, CA 94608

 Mathew Summers, Molecular and Cell Biology; Jonathan Proctor, Global Policy Lab

 Science@Cal

Grounds for Science is a public science talk series organized by and featuring UC Berkeley graduate students. GfS takes place the 4th Friday of every month at Scarlet City Espresso Bar in Emeryville.
This month's short talks:
The cells that give us sight with Mathew Summers

What volcanoes can teach us about combating global climate change with Jonathan Proctor

Monday, February 25, 2019

SLAM: Negotiating Difficult Conversations in Academic Research Monday

Workshop | February 25 | 5-7 p.m. | 177 Stanley Hall

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

Please join SLAM and the UC Berkeley Ombuds Office for a workshop about navigating difficult conversations and conflict management in scientific research! This workshop is designed to help graduate students and postdocs in STEM fields here at Berkeley negotiate tricky personal and professional relationships in the lab.

When you register, you will have the opportunity to indicate specific...   More >

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

David Chandler Lecture in Physical Chemistry: Bubbles in space-time, or how to think about supercooled liquids, glasses and slow dynamics

Seminar: Physical Chemistry | February 26 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Juan Garrahan, Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Nottingham

 College of Chemistry

Despite having made many fundamental contributions to the theory of
liquids from early in his career, David Chandler only began paying
serious attention to one of its central problems, that of the glass
transition in supercooled liquids, relatively late. This started when
David and I met in Oxford in early 2001 during one of his sabbaticals,
and developed into our joint work in this...   More >

Thermo Fisher Infosession

Information Session | February 26 | 5-6 p.m. | 410 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Learn about careers at Thermo Fisher! Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. is the world leader in serving science! We help our customers accelerate life sciences research, solve complex analytical challenges, improve patient diagnostics, deliver medicines to market and increase laboratory productivity. Through our premier brands - Thermo Scientific, Applied Biosystems, Invitrogen, Fisher Scientific and...   More >

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Graphene-based Biosensors: Real-time biological Search

Seminar | February 27 | 12-1 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Kiana Aran, Keck Graduate Institute

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Graphene-based biosensors have the potential to revolutionize digital biochemical measurements for applications in the field of drug discovery, biomedicine, integrated diagnostics and environmental monitoring. This talk will describe the design and development of novel graphene-based biosensors and their use in facile identification of clinically relevant biomarkers in cancer and aging. In...   More >

Graduate Student Activities Showcase

Information Session: Chem. & Biomol. Engineering Colloquium | February 27 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Tan Hall

 Department of Chemical Engineering

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Graduate Research Seminar

Seminar: Graduate Research Seminar | February 28 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall

 Ms. Hyo Jin Jang, Graduate Student for Professor Christopher Chang, www.cchem.berkeley.edu/cjcgrp/

 Department of Chemistry

Coffee served @10:50am at the Coffee Lab

Graduate Research Seminar

Seminar: Graduate Research Seminar | February 28 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall

 Ms. Anneliese Gest, Graduate Student for Professor Evan Miller, https://mcb.berkeley.edu/faculty/bbs/millere.html

 Department of Chemistry

Coffee served @10:50am at the Coffee Lab

Bio-Tech Connect: Networking with industry

Career Fair | February 28 | 3:30-6 p.m. | Stanley Hall, Atrium

 Bioengineering (BioE)

The top talent of UC Berkeley and local biotech employers at the largest biomedical industry event on campus.

Meet representatives from local biotech companies, large and small! All majors and levels welcome - early undergrad to PhD. Not a career fair - some will be hiring, some just want to meet you. Bring your resume if you're job searching and meet some awesome companies.

 

  RSVP online

Graduate Research Conference

Seminar: Graduate Research Conference | February 28 | 4-5 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall

 Mr. ARSENAULT, ERIC ALAN, Graduate Student with Professor Graham Fleming, www.cchem.berkeley.edu/grfgrp/

 Mr. WRONA, PAUL RYAN, Graduate Student with Professor Phillip Geissler/ Professor Eran Rabani, www.cchem.berkeley.edu/plggrp/index.html/https://vcresearch.berkeley.edu/faculty/eran-rabani

 Department of Chemistry

Coffee served @3:50pm at the Coffee Lab