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<< Week of September 26 >>

Monday, September 26, 2016

Joint Physics Colloquium and MCB Seminar: "Today's fresh sheet: Latest results on demixing of lipids and proteins in membranes"

Seminar: Structural & Quantitative Biology | September 26 | 4:15-5:15 p.m. | 1 LeConte Hall


Sarah Keller, University of Washington

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Department of Physics


Abstract: Lipids and proteins in model and cell-derived membranes demix through a reversible phase transition. Micron-scale domains appear below a distinct miscibility transition temperature and disappear above it. This seminar summarizes research published in the past year that measures fundamental parameters of membrane demixing and that probes demixing in new membrane systems.

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Transition Metal-Catalyzed Amination and Amidation Reactions

Seminar: Organic Chemistry | September 27 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall | Canceled


Kami L. Hull, PhD, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

College of Chemistry


Carbon–nitrogen bonds are ubiquitous in pharmaceuticals, organic materials, and natural products. These C–N bonds are often incorporated as amines or amides. Despite their prominence, they are often formed in poor atom and step economy.



Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Graduate Research Seminar: Exploration of Nav1.7 Site 2 using Aconitine Analogs

Seminar: Graduate Research Seminar | September 29 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall


Ms. Nicolle Doering, Graduate Student for Professor Richmond Sarpong, www.cchem.berkeley.edu/rsgrp/

Department of Chemistry


Coffee served @10:50am at the Coffee Lab



Friday, September 30, 2016

Revealing the structural basis of GPCR signaling through atomic-level simulation

Seminar: Statistical Mechanics | September 30 | 2-4 p.m. | 775B Tan Hall


Professor Ron Dror, Stanford University Departments of Computer Science and Molecular and Cellular Physiology

College of Chemistry