Seminars & Events

<< Week of February 22 >>

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Amgen Seminar in Organic Chemistry: How structure can inform GPCR drug discovery

Seminar: Organic Chemistry | February 19 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall | Canceled

 Bryan Roth, Department of Pharmacology, UNC School of Medicine

 College of Chemistry

In this talk I will first present unpublished work highlighting our current structure-based efforts to understand how small molecules interact with G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). I will then show how these structural insights can facilitate GPCR drug discovery.

Recent papers: Wang et al, Science 2017 (PMID: 29051383); Wang et al, Nature 2018 (PMID: 29466326); Che et al, Cell 2018 (PMID:...   More >

Virtual Coffee Chat with Undergraduate Dean John Arnold

Meeting: Alumni event | February 19 | 12-1 p.m. |  Your home computer or phone

 John Arnold, Undergraduate Dean

 College of Chemistry

Please join our Undergraduate Dean John Arnold for a one-hour virtual Coffee Chat on Tuesday, February 19th at Noon PST to hear an update on Undergraduate Programs at the College.

Probing Both Ice and Multicomponent Interfaces

Seminar: Physical Chemistry | February 19 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Mary Jane Shultz, Department of Chemistry, Tufts University

 College of Chemistry

Soft interfaces such as ice or those containing multiple species are common in biology, the environment, and technological applications. Probing these, particularly when the interface is buried between two condensed phases presents many challenges. The only current method available to probe such interfaces with molecular specificity is the vibrational spectroscopy, sum frequency generation (SFG)....   More >

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Proteoforms in human health and disease

Seminar | February 20 | 12-1 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Neil Kelleher, Northwestern University

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Proteoforms are the specific molecular forms of proteins arising from human genes encoded in the human genome. They include all sources of protein variation, and here’s a list: sequence mutations, alternative splicing, and post-translational modifications (PTMs). They underlie diverse biological systems and proteoform diversity is directly linked to functions, pathway modulation, and disease...   More >

Electrokinetic Control of Interfacial Instabilities

Colloquium: Chem. & Biomol. Engineering Colloquium | February 20 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Tan Hall

 Martin Bazant, Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 Department of Chemical Engineering

This talk will describe three examples of interfacial patterns – viscous fingers, deionization shocks, and metal dendrites – whose stability can be controlled by electrokinetic phenomena in charged porous media, as evidenced by both theory and experiments. Potential applications include electrically enhanced oil recovery, water desalination and purification by shock electrodialysis, and energy...   More >

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Graduate Research Seminar

Seminar: Graduate Research Seminar | February 21 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall

 Ms. Maria Paley, Graduate Student for Professor Jeffrey Long, alchemy.cchem.berkeley.edu/group-members

 Department of Chemistry

Coffee served @10:50am at the Coffee Lab

Graduate Research Seminar

Seminar: Graduate Research Seminar | February 21 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall

 Mr. Joshua Turnbull, Graduate Student for Professor Evan Miller, https://mcb.berkeley.edu/faculty/bbs/millere.html

 Department of Chemistry

Coffee served @10:50am at the Coffee Lab

Graduate Research Conference

Seminar: Graduate Research Conference | February 21 | 4-5 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall

 Mr. DAS, AVISHEK, Graduate Student with Professor David Limmer, www.cchem.berkeley.edu/dtlgrp/

 Ms. TAN, JENNA, Graduate Student with Professor Naomi Ginsberg, www.cchem.berkeley.edu/nsggrp/

 Department of Chemistry

Coffee served @3:50pm at the Coffee Lab

Editing The Code Of Life: The Future Of Genome Editing

Lecture | February 21 | 5-6:30 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Dr. Jennifer Doudna

 Institute of International Studies

Our technological capacity to make changes to genomic data has expanded exponentially since the 2012 discovery of CRISPR-Cas9 as an RNA-programmable genome editing tool. Over the past seven years, this genome editing platform has been used to revolutionize research, develop new agricultural crops, and even promises to cure genetic diseases. However, ethical and societal concerns abound, requiring...   More >

Friday, February 22, 2019

Interfacial Engineering of Lithium Metal Anodes: From Liquid to Solid Electrolytes: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | February 22 | 2-3 p.m. | 4 LeConte Hall

 Prof. Neil Dasgupta, Univ. of Michigan, Mechanical Engineering

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

The poor performance and safety concerns of lithium (Li) metal anodes represent a critical challenge to enable high energy density rechargeable batteries. This is attributed to several well-known issues associated with Li metal electrodeposition and dissolution, including electrolyte decomposition, dendrite evolution, and “dead” Li accumulation. In addition, short-circuiting can occur due to the...   More >

Leveraging Polarizability and Electrophilicity in Catalysts for Challenging Coupling Reactions

Seminar: Inorganic Chemistry | February 22 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Brad Carrow, Department of Chemistry, Princeton University

 College of Chemistry

A general approach by our group for the development of new catalytic synthetic methods that occur with higher efficiency and selectivity, use simpler reagents, and proceed with lower energy demand involves new ancillary ligand design coupled with fundamental studies of how metal-ligand bonding dictates catalytic reactivity. In this context, the presentation will focus on our recent efforts to...   More >

Grounds for Science -Getting the most out of light: vision and geoengineering

Lecture | February 22 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Scarlet City Espresso Bar

 3960Espresso Bar Adeline Street, Emeryville, CA 94608

 Mathew Summers, Molecular and Cell Biology; Jonathan Proctor, Global Policy Lab

 Science@Cal

Grounds for Science is a public science talk series organized by and featuring UC Berkeley graduate students. GfS takes place the 4th Friday of every month at Scarlet City Espresso Bar in Emeryville.
This month's short talks:
The cells that give us sight with Mathew Summers

What volcanoes can teach us about combating global climate change with Jonathan Proctor