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Spring 2018

Monday, February 5, 2018

Dr. David Knowles, Departments of Genetics and Radiology, Stanford University: Probabilistic models of transcriptomic dysregulation in human disease

Seminar: Bioinformatics Seminars | February 5 | 4-5 p.m. | Soda Hall, HP Auditorium 306


Center for Computational Biology, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)


Abstract:
Transcription, the fundamental cellular process by which DNA is copied to RNA, is tightly regulated in healthy human development but frequently dysregulated in disease. During or shortly after transcription, regions known as “introns” are spliced out of the RNA to produce mature “messenger” RNA. Massively parallel sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) has become a ubiquitous technology in...   More >

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Dr. Nilah Ioannidis, Departments of Biomedical Data Science and Genetics, Stanford University: Computational methods for interpreting genetic variation of unknown significance

Seminar: Bioinformatics Seminars | February 13 | 4-5 p.m. | Soda Hall, HP Auditorium 306


Center for Computational Biology, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)


Abstract:
Understanding the clinical significance of personal genome variation is a major challenge for personalized medicine, with large numbers of variants of unknown significance discovered in next-generation sequencing studies. I will first discuss two machine learning tools that we recently developed to predict the clinical significance of individual genetic variants. REVEL is a random...   More >

Thursday, February 22, 2018

Dr. Aaron McKenna, Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington: Resolving whole organism cell fate with CRISPR/Cas9

Seminar: Bioinformatics Seminars | February 22 | 4-5 p.m. | Soda Hall, HP Auditorium 306


Center for Computational Biology, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)


Abstract: Multicellular organisms develop by way of a lineage tree, a series of cell divisions that give rise to cell types, tissues, and organs. However, our knowledge of the cell lineage and its determinants remains extremely fragmentary for nearly all species. This includes all vertebrates and arthropods such as Drosophila, wherein cell lineage varies between individuals; embryos and organs.

Monday, February 26, 2018

Dr. Mingfu Shao, Department of Computational Biology, Carnegie Mellon University: Efficient algorithms for large-scale transcriptomics and genomics

Seminar: Bioinformatics Seminars | February 26 | 4-5 p.m. | Soda Hall, HP Auditorium 306


Center for Computational Biology, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)


Title:


Abstract:

I will present modeling and algorithmic designs for two challenging problems in biology and argue that efficient computational methods enable significant advances in our understanding of cell machinery and genome evolution. The first problem is the assembly of full-length transcripts -- the collection of expressed gene products in cells -- from noisy and highly...   More >

Thursday, March 1, 2018

Dr. Julia Fukuyama, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Institute: Using Phylogenetic Information to Understand the Microbiome

Seminar: Bioinformatics Seminars | March 1 | 4-5 p.m. | Soda Hall, 306, HP Auditorium


Center for Computational Biology, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)


Abstract:
Transcription, the fundamental cellular process by which DNA is copied to RNA, is tightly regulated in healthy human development but frequently dysregulated in disease. During or shortly after transcription, regions known as “introns” are spliced out of the RNA to produce mature “messenger” RNA. Massively parallel sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) has become a ubiquitous technology in...   More >

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Center for Computational Biology Seminar: Dr. Christina Curtis, Assistant Professor, School of Medicine, Stanford University

Seminar: Bioinformatics Seminars | March 7 | 4:30-5:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Center for Computational Biology


Title: Quantifying the evolutionary dynamics of tumor progression and metastasis

Abstract: Cancer results from the acquisition of somatic alterations in an evolutionary process that typically occurs over many years, much of which is occult. Understanding the evolutionary dynamics that are operative at different stages of progression in individual tumors might inform the earlier detection,...   More >

Thursday, March 8, 2018

Dr. Tal Korem, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, Weizmann Institute of Science: Microbiome analysis in clinical research: Can our microbes tell us what to eat?

Seminar: Bioinformatics Seminars | March 8 | 4-5 p.m. | Soda Hall, 306, HP Auditorium


Center for Computational Biology, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)


The gut microbiome is an immense microbial ecosystem with unique and diverse metabolic capabilities. In the past decade, it has been associated with multiple chronic and complex diseases, raising great hopes for novel medical advances. But are contemporary microbiome analysis methods useful in a clinical setting? I will present new tools that we developed for the analysis of the gut microbiome...   More >

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Wednesday, May 2, 2018