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<< October 2017 >>

Monday, October 2, 2017

​Graduate Student Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | October 2 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Cecile Fortune, Flannery Lab; Kelly Byrne, Silver Lab

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Kelly Byrne (Michael Silver Lab)

Title: The relationship between cholinergic enhancement and visuospatial perception

Abstract: Acetylcholine (ACh) is synthesized in the basal forebrain and diffused widely throughout the brain, exerting diverse neuromodulatory effects. Animal physiology studies indicate that in visual cortex, ACh modulates spatial integration by changing neuronal receptive...   More >

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium: Data Slam 1

Colloquium | October 5 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Ye Xia, Whitney lab; Carson McNeil, Gallant lab; Darius Parvin, Ivry lab; Maria Eckstein, Collins lab; Kata Slama, Knight lab; Dan Lurie, D'Esposito lab

Department of Psychology


Data slam from grads in Cognitive Neuroscience/Neuroscience. Grad lounge afterwards for pingpong/foosball plus drinks and pizza.

Monday, October 9, 2017

​Biophysical Cues and Ocular Cell Behaviors: The Big Impact of Little and Squishy Things

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | October 9 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Chris Murphy, D.V.M., PhD, Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science, UC Davis; Sara Thomasy, D.V.M., PhD, Associate Professor and Associate Researcher, Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences, UC Davis

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Biophysical cues, such as substratum topography and compliance, are ubiquitous attributes of the miroenvironment of cells. They have been proven to be as potent as soluble cytoactive factors in the modulation of cell behaviors. The main focus of our labs has been the investigation of how biophysical cues modulate cell adhesion, proliferation, migration, differentiation, and response to growth...   More >

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Curiosity-driven Exploration by Self-supervised Prediction

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | October 11 | 12:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Deepak Pathak, UC Berkeley/BAIR

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


In many real-world scenarios, rewards extrinsic to the agent are extremely sparse, or absent altogether. In such cases, curiosity can serve as an intrinsic reward signal to enable the agent to explore its environment and learn skills that might be useful later in its life. We formulate curiosity as the error in an agent’s ability to predict the consequence of its own actions in a visual feature...   More >

Monday, October 16, 2017

​Crowding from three sides: Foveal interference, spatial attention, and appearance

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | October 16 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Dan Coates, PhD, University of Houston Optometry

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract: Crowding, the deleterious influence of clutter on identification of a target, is typically studied in the visual periphery, where it is a fundamental limit to visual perception. Most experiments entail keen spatial focus on a flanked target, which must be categorized using forced-choice response methods. I present several recent studies that extend conventional practice. First, I...   More >

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Genetic Approaches to Brain Circuit Mapping and Cell Type Characterization

Seminar | October 19 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Hongkui Zeng, Allen Institute for Brain Science

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH



Monday, October 23, 2017

​Imaging Retinal Ganglion Cells

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | October 23 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Don Miller, PhD, Indiana University School of Optometry

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract: The retinal ganglion cell is the primary cell damaged by glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible visual loss worldwide. While we have a detailed understanding of the atrophy this disease inflicts on retinal ganglion cells, our ability to assess this damage in the living human eye is limited. A major obstacle is the difficulty to image—and thus count—these cells owing to their high...   More >

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Monday, October 30, 2017