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<< May 2017 >>

Monday, May 1, 2017

Graduate Student Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | May 1 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Rachel Albert, PhD Candidate (O’Brein Lab); Paul Cullen (Flanagan Lab)

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Rachel Albert's talk title is:

Latency Requirements for Foveated Rendering

&

Paul Cullen's talk title is:

Under Pressure: Understanding Glaucoma through the Lens of Astrocyte Reactivity

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

My Love Affair with the Brain: May Movie at Moffitt

Film - Documentary | May 3 | 7-9 p.m. | 405 Moffitt Undergraduate Library


Library


Spend Wednesday evening of RRR week learning more about your brain, and how it can thrive! This delightful documentary follows renowned brain scientist and UC Berkeley professor emerita of anatomy, Dr. Marian Diamond, introducing us to her groundbreaking accomplishments at a time when so few women entered her field, as well as her entertaining teaching style and charming personality.


Students - Graduate, Students - Undergraduate

Students - Graduate, Students - Undergraduate

Must have a UCB student ID for entrance.

Thursday, May 4, 2017

Friday, May 5, 2017

Cognition Colloquium: David Bourgin, "Putting the “me” back in recommendation: A comparative study of recommendation models from computer science and cognitive psychology"

Colloquium | May 5 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Room 5101


David Bourgin, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Grad student David Bourgin will present some of his original research, "Putting the “me” back in recommendation: A comparative study of recommendation models from computer science and cognitive psychology."

Monday, May 8, 2017

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Selective Attention in the Service of Reinforcement Learning: 2017 Ghiselli Lecture

Lecture | May 10 | 3 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Professor Yael Niv, Princeton University

Department of Psychology


On the face of it, most real-world world tasks are hopelessly complex from the point of view of reinforcement learning mechanisms. In particular, due to the "curse of dimensionality", even the simple task of crossing the street should, in principle, take thousands of trials to learn to master. But we are better than that.. How does our brain do it? In this talk I will argue that the limited...   More >

Monday, May 15, 2017

Behavioural Signatures of Ganglion Cell Dysfunction in Glaucoma

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | May 15 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  100 Minor Addition


​Andrew John Anderson, University of Melbourne

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


​It is well established that retinal ganglion cells die in glaucoma. What is less clear is whether glaucoma induces a protracted period of dysfunction prior to cell death. This talk will review the strengths and limitations of some of the behavioural evidence that has been used to argue for the presence of dysfunctional retinal ganglion cells in glaucoma. Establishing that such dysfunction...   More >



Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Neuroscience Thesis Symposium

Conference/Symposium: Thesis Seminar | May 17 | 12-6 p.m. | 245 Li Ka Shing Center


Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


12pm: Joe Driscoll, Fields lab
“Circuit Specific Modulation by Corticotrophin Releasing Factor in Ventral Tegmental Neurons”

12:45pm: Chris Holdgraf, Knight lab
"Predictive models for studying auditory perception in human electrophysiology"

1:30pm: Shawn Marks, Jagust lab
“The influence of age and Alzheimer’s pathology on hippocampal function”

2:15pm: Anna Vlasits, Feller...   More >

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Neuroscience Thesis Symposium

Conference/Symposium: Thesis Seminar | May 18 | 3:30-5:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


3:30pm – Brian Isett, Feldman lab
"Simultaneous coding of texture and local shape in mouse somatosensory cortex"

4:15pm – Yvonne Fonken, Knight lab
“How what we know shapes future perception and action: investigating the mechanisms of prediction in the brain.”

Monday, May 22, 2017

Oxyopia Graduate Student Seminar

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | May 22 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Nevin Wadie El-Nimri OD, MS, FAAO PhD Candidate

Title: Effect of Topical Latanoprost on Myopia Progression in Guinea Pigs

Abstract: Myopia (near-sightedness) results from progressive, excessive eye enlargement and is associated with blinding complications. It has become a significant public health concern, reaching epidemic levels in some parts of the world. The eye is like a balloon, with...   More >

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

The Role of Astrocytes in Neurovascular Coupling at the Capillary and Arteriole Level in the Retina and Brain

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | May 23 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Anusha Mishra, University College London, UK

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Neuronal activity evokes a spatially and temporally localized increase in blood flow to power the information processing carried out by the neurons, a phenomenon that underlies BOLD fMRI signals. This neurovascular coupling occurs both in the brain and the retina.

In the retina, both light- and glial-stimulation evoke pronounced arteriole dilations (30.8±3.7% and 23.5±4.1%, respectively). This...   More >

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Time-Contrastive Networks: Self-Supervised Learning from Multi-View Observation

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | May 24 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Pierre Sermanet, Google Brain

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


We propose a self-supervised approach for learning representations entirely from unlabeled videos recorded from multiple viewpoints. This is particularly relevant to robotic imitation learning, which requires a viewpoint-invariant understanding of the relationships between humans and their environment, including object interactions, attributes and body pose. We train our representations using a...   More >

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Likelihood Based Evaluation for Scanpath Models in Scene Viewing

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | May 30 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Heiko Schütt, University of Tübingen

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


When observers view natural scenes their eye movements show elaborate statistical patterns beyond the fixation density over an image. An important approach to understand these patterns --- and thus ultimately to understand how humans choose where to look at --- is to build models which generate full scanpaths in natural scenes, i.e. a sequence of fixation locations. There are a multitude of...   More >



Neural circuits for goal-directed sensorimotor transformation

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | May 30 | 2-3:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Carl Petersen, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL)

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


A key function of the brain is to interpret incoming sensory information in the context of learned associations in order to guide adaptive behavior. However, the precise neuronal circuits and causal mechanisms underlying goal-directed sensorimotor transformations remain to be clearly defined for the mammalian brain. Technological advances in mouse genetics to define cell-types, in optogenetics to...   More >