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Upcoming Events

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Cognition Colloquium: “I Can Explain Everything: The Independent Mitigating Power of Explanations.”

Colloquium | September 29 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3201 (Warner Brown Room)


Carly Giffin, Graduate Student, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


PhD student Carly Giffin will present her work, “I Can Explain Everything: The Independent Mitigating Power of Explanations.”



Merging our senses: a brain challenge for perceptual reality

Seminar | September 29 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Dora Angelaki, Rice University, Department of Neuroscience

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Friday, September 30, 2016

ICBS Colloquium

Colloquium | September 30 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Amanda Woodward, University of Chicago

Department of Psychology



Putting the action back into infant cognition

Lecture: ICBS Seminar | September 30 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Amanda Woodward, University of Chicago

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


http://woodwardlab.uchicago.edu/

Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Talk by Professor Philippe Schyns and Dr Rachael Jack: Modelling social face signals and their dynamic processing in the brain

Colloquium | October 4 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Department of Psychology


In a two-part talk, the speakers describe how psychophysical methods can be used to model dynamic facial expressions and to explore information processing in the brain.
Part of the Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquia
Sponsored by HWNI and the Dept. Psychology, UC Berkeley

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Robert Tryon Lecture: Do Pregnancy-related Risk Factors Cause Psychopathology? The Importance of Family-Based Designs

Lecture | October 5 | 3 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room


Brian D' Onofrio, Indiana University

Department of Psychology


Professor Brian D'Onofrio of Indiana University will deliver the annual Tryon Lecture, on the general topic of how genes and environmental influences contribute to the development of antisocial behavior and other important life outcomes.

Robert Choate Tryon received his Ph.D from the University of California, Berkeley in 1928 and was a faculty member of the Department of Psychology at UC...   More >

Thursday, October 6, 2016

Cognition Colloquium: Faculty Lightning Talks

Colloquium | October 6 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3201 (Warner Brown Room)


Michael Ranney, Professor, UC Berkeley; Terry Regier, Professor, UC Berkeley; Juliana Schroeder, Assistant Professor, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


UC Berkeley professors who do cross disciplinary psychology research will give short research presentations. We'll hear from Professors Ranney (psych and education), Regier (psych and linguistics), and Schroeder (psych at Haas).



Why Do Oligodendrocytes Myelinate Axons But Not Dendrites?

Lecture: HWNI/MCB Seminar | October 6 | 4 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Jonah Chan, UCSF

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Myelination occurs selectively around neuronal axons to increase the efficiency and velocity of action potentials. While we have previously shown that oligodendrocytes are capable of myelinating permissive structures in the absence of molecular cues, structurally permissive neuronal somata and dendrites remain unmyelinated. We demonstrate that disruption of dynamic neuron-oligodendrocyte...   More >

Thursday, October 13, 2016

Cognition Colloquium: “Eye movements provide insight into the development of analogical reasoning.”

Colloquium | October 13 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3201 (Warner Brown Room)


Ariel Starr, Postdoc, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Postdoc Ariel Starr will present her work, “Eye movements provide insight into the development of analogical reasoning.”

Friday, October 14, 2016

Developmental and aging-related changes in sleep's role in cognition

Colloquium | October 14 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Rebecca Spencer, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Department of Psychology


Sleep contributes to cognitive function. For instance, memories are consolidated and selective attention and emotion regulation are enhanced with overnight sleep and mid-day naps. Our work has considered the ramifications of the cognitive functions of sleep on development and aging. Does increased sleep, via daytime naps, enhance cognition during early development? Conversely, do age-related...   More >

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Division of Neurobiology and H. Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | October 20 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Bassem Hassan, Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Vision and Light: Extending the Senses

Exhibit - Painting | October 27 – 28, 2016 every day |  Energy Biosciences Building


Department of Psychology


Science@Cal invites participation in an exciting artistic and scientific event this fall entitled Vision + Light: Extending the Senses. This unique program will run for two evenings on October 27 and 28 as part of the Bay Area Science Festival, and is produced by Science@Cal in partnership with the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, with additional support from the ZEISS Berkeley Brain...   More >



Cognition Colloquium: Deep CNN features as a basis for modeling human representations.

Colloquium | October 27 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3201 (Warner Brown Room)


Josh Peterson, Graduate Student, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


PhD student Josh Peterson will present his work, "Deep CNN features as a basis for modeling human representations."



Friday, October 28, 2016

Vision and Light: Extending the Senses

Exhibit - Painting | October 27 – 28, 2016 every day |  Energy Biosciences Building


Department of Psychology


Science@Cal invites participation in an exciting artistic and scientific event this fall entitled Vision + Light: Extending the Senses. This unique program will run for two evenings on October 27 and 28 as part of the Bay Area Science Festival, and is produced by Science@Cal in partnership with the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, with additional support from the ZEISS Berkeley Brain...   More >



Building newborn minds in virtual worlds

Colloquium | October 28 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall


Justin Wood, University of Southern California

Department of Psychology


How do newborns learn to see and understand the world? Although philosophers and psychologists have debated the origins of the mind for centuries, two major barriers have hindered progress. First, human infants cannot be raised in strictly controlled environments from birth, so it has not been possible to examine how specific experiences shape the newborn mind. Second, infants cannot be observed...   More >

Thursday, November 3, 2016

Cognition Colloquium: Can science explain the human mind? Intuitive judgments about the limits of science.

Colloquium | November 3 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3201 (Warner Brown Room)


Sara Gottlieb, Graduate Student, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


PhD student Sara Gottlieb will present her work, "Can science explain the human mind? Intuitive judgments about the limits of science."



Division of Neurobiology and H. Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | November 3 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Stephen Liberles, Harvard Medical School

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Thursday, November 10, 2016

Cognition Colloquium

Colloquium | November 10 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3201 (Warner Brown Room)


Josh McDermott, Assistant Professor, MIT

Department of Psychology


MIT Professor Josh McDermott will present some of his research on the auditory abilities of human beings.

Thursday, November 17, 2016

Cognition Colloquium: Ecological Learning: Sensitivity and adaptivity of learning strategies across the lifespan.

Colloquium | November 17 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3201 (Warner Brown Room)


Azzurra Rugeri, Postdoc, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Postdoc Azzurra Rugeri will present some of her research, "Ecological Learning: Sensitivity and adaptivity of learning strategies across the lifespan."

Thursday, December 1, 2016

Division of Neurobiology and H. Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | December 1 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Takaki Komiyama, University of California, San Diego

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Neuroscience Student Seminar Series

Seminar | February 9 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Bernardo Sabatini, Harvard Medical School

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Thursday, April 6, 2017

Neuroscience Student Seminar Series

Seminar | April 6 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Danielle Bassett, University of Pennsylvania

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Division of Neurobiology and H. Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | April 27 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Elizabeth Buffalo, University of Washington

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Thursday, May 4, 2017

Division of Neurobiology and H. Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | May 4 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Karen Zito, University of California, Davis

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

The Role of Astrocytes in Neurovascular Coupling at the Capillary and Arteriole Level in the Retina and Brain

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | May 23 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Anusha Mishra, University College London, UK

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Neuronal activity evokes a spatially and temporally localized increase in blood flow to power the information processing carried out by the neurons, a phenomenon that underlies BOLD fMRI signals. This neurovascular coupling occurs both in the brain and the retina.

In the retina, both light- and glial-stimulation evoke pronounced arteriole dilations (30.8±3.7% and 23.5±4.1%, respectively). This...   More >