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Thursday, February 11, 2016

Cognition Colloquium: "Metacognition and Mental Simulation”

Colloquium | February 11 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Warner Brown Room, 3201


Jess Hamrick

Department of Psychology


Jess Hamrick will present a talk titled, "Metacognition and Mental Simulation”

Friday, February 12, 2016

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience Colloquium: Pablo Celnik

Colloquium | February 16 | 4:10 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 5101 Tolman


Pablo Celnik, John Hopkins

Department of Psychology


Host: Rich Ivry

Wednesday, February 17, 2016

BioE-HWNI Seminar: “Rapid high-resolution mapping of intact brains structure and function”

Seminar | February 17 | 12-1 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building


Raju Tomer, Stanford University

Bioengineering (BioE)


Spring 2016 Seminar Series

Wednesday, February 17
12noon - 1:00pm
290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building
please note new room location

“Rapid high-resolution mapping of intact brains structure and function”

Raju Tomer
Senior Scientist
Stanford University

Development of molecular tools for optical observation and intervention of neuronal activity, and development of tissue clearing...   More >

Thursday, February 18, 2016

Cognition Colloquium: Disentangling multiple contributions to human learning

Colloquium | February 18 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Warner Brown Room, 3201


Anne Collins, Assistant Professor, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Professor Anne Collins will present a talk titled,"Disentangling multiple contributions to human learning"

Friday, February 19, 2016

What have we learned about the pathophysiology and regulation of common inflammatory disorders of the cornea and ocular surface?

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | February 19 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Reza Dana, Harvard Medical School

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


This talk will provide an overview of some of the key pathophysiologic mechanisms of corneal inflammation, angiogenesis, and transplant immunity. Cornea-specific regulatory mechanisms, such as those expressed by the corneal epithelium and resident immune cells, which maintain immune homeostasis will be emphasized. We will then provide survey of how chronic T cell-mediated autoimmunity and dry eye...   More >



Dan Feldman on Santiago Ramón y Cajal’s Drawings of Brain Structures: Perspectives on the Architecture of Life: Lunchtime Talks

Lecture | February 19 | 12:15 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Dan Feldman

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Dan Feldman, of UC Berkeley's Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, UC Berkeley neuroscientist, explores Spanish neuroscientist Ramón y Cajal’s pioneering drawings of neural networks.


$12 General Admission, $10 non-UC Berkeley students, 65+, disabled persons, Free BAMPFA members; UC Berkeley Students, Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; 18 & under + guardian

Lectures are included with Gallery Admission. Buy tickets online.

Monday, February 22, 2016

Viral Vector-mediated Gene Therapy for Retinal Degeneration

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | February 22 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Leah Byrne, Postdoc (Schaffer Lab @ UC Berkeley & Beltran Lab @ UPenn)

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Recent clinical trials using adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene delivery have shown great promise for the treatment of inherited retinal degenerative disease. However, current available gene therapy strategies are not appropriate for the majority of conditions. Advances in gene therapy approaches, including creation of advanced vectors for more efficient delivery to the retina, more...   More >

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience Colloquium: Cory Miller

Colloquium | February 23 | 4:10 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 5101 Tolman


Cory Miller, University of California, San Diego

Department of Psychology


Host: Frederic Theunissen

Primates are social animals.  We are perhaps most distinguished from other species by our sophisticated societies and the manner in which individuals navigate the nuances of these dynamic systems. The myriad of social interactions inherent to primate societies are governed by social rules and mitigated by a suite of social signals.  In this talk, I will present...   More >

Thursday, February 25, 2016

Cognition Colloquium: Cognition in the wild and in silico

Colloquium | February 25 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Warner Brown Room, 3201


Mikel Delgado, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Mikel Delgado will be presenting her original research "Cognition in the wild and in silico."

Saturday, February 27, 2016

My Love Affair With the Brain: The Life and Science of Dr. Marian Diamond

Special Event | February 27 | 1 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, Luna Productions, BAMPFA, Department of Integrative Biology, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Cal Alumni Association, Center for Research and Education on Aging, Division of Biological Sciences, Department of Psychology, Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS)


A celebration of Dr. Marian Diamond and her pioneering contributions to modern neuroscience, including a pre-release screening of the documentary, My Love Affair with the Brain.


Alumni, Faculty, Friends of the University, General Public, Students - Graduate, Students - Undergraduate

All Audiences

Monday, February 29, 2016

When and Why does Crowding Occur?

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | February 29 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Peter Bex, Northeastern University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Outside the fovea, highly visible objects that are easily identified in isolation can be rendered unrecognizable by nearby features, an effect known as crowding. Given that the vast majority of the visual field is extra-foveal and that natural scenes are usually packed with features, our vision is dominated not by contrast sensitivity or acuity, but by crowding. Competing theories posit that...   More >



Earclub: “Why rapid adaptive processes are essential for listening in realistic auditory environments”

Colloquium | February 29 | 4-6 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3105 (Beach Room)


Shihab Shamma, Institute of Systems Research; Electrical & Computer Engineering University of Maryland, College Park, MD.

Department of Psychology


Humans can attend to one of multiple sounds, and follow it selectively over time. The neural underpinnings of this perceptual feat are the object of extensive investigations. I will review the fundamentals of sound representation in the auditory cortex. I will then explain how source segregation depends primarily on the rapid plasticity in auditory cortical responses that can track the temporally...   More >

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience Colloquium: Yaoda Xu

Colloquium | March 1 | 4:10 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 5101 Tolman


Yaoda Xu, Harvard University

Department of Psychology


Host: David Whitney

Yaoda Xu will be giving a talk about "Multi-level and Dynamic Visual Object Representations in the Human Brain."

Thursday, March 3, 2016

Cognition Colloquium

Colloquium | March 3 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Warner Brown Room, 3201


Zach Pardos, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Zach Pardos will be presenting his original research.



The emergence of circuit model of addiction

Seminar | March 3 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Christian Luscher, University of Geneva

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience Colloquium: Tim Verstynen

Colloquium | March 8 | 4:10 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 5101 Tolman


Tim Verstynen, Carnegie Mellon University

Department of Psychology


Humans and other mammals exhibit a high degree of control when selecting actions in noisy contexts and can quickly adapt to unexpected outcomes in order to better resolve uncertainty in the future. This capacity depends heavily on cortico-basal ganglia circuits. In contrast with the canonical parallel and independent pathways model, emerging evidence suggests that basal ganglia pathways...   More >

Wednesday, March 9, 2016

BioE-HWNI Seminar: “Linking neural variability to behavior”

Seminar | March 9 | 12-1 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building


Tatiana Engel, Stanford University

Bioengineering (BioE)


Spring 2016 Seminar Series

Wednesday, March 9
12noon - 1:00pm
290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building
please note new room location

“Linking neural variability to behavior”

Tatiana Engel
Research Specialist
Stanford University

Neural responses are variable: the same external events usually trigger different patterns of neural activity. These activity fluctuations have been...   More >

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Cognition Colloquium

Colloquium | March 10 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Warner Brown Room, 3201


Mike Pacer, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Mike Pacer will be presenting his original research.

Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Thursday, March 17, 2016

Earclub: Working memory capacity, the brain, and childhood development

Colloquium | March 17 | 3:30-5:30 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3201 (Warner Brown Room)


Nelson Cowan, Department of Psychological Sciences University of Missouri

Department of Psychology


You need to keep in mind multiple things at once to understand language, solve problems, or plan your day's activities. I will describe what cognitive experiments and brain research seem to tell us about humans’ working memory, our ability to keep things in mind. There are some situations that make it difficult to keep more than a few simple items in working memory, and other situations that...   More >



Cognition Colloquium: "Working memory capacity, the brain, and childhood development”

Colloquium | March 17 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Warner Brown Room, 3201


Nelson Cowan, Professor, University of Missouri

Department of Psychology


Professor Nelson Cowan from the University of Missouri will present a talk titled,"Working memory capacity, the brain, and childhood development.”



Molecular and neural sensing of social cues

Seminar | March 17 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Catherine DuLac, Harvard University

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Monday, March 28, 2016

Earclub: Developing efficient measures of Central Hearing Ability

Colloquium | March 28 | 4-6 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3105 (Beach Room)


Erick Gallun, National Center. for Rehabilitative Auditory Research VA Portland Health Care System and Oregon health and Science Univ.

Department of Psychology


One of the most important challenges that faces clinical audiology is the need to develop efficient measures of hearing ability that specifically and reliably assess the integrity of the entire auditory system. While this goal still lies in the distant future, this talk will describe a set of candidate measures that have been shown to provide diagnostic information for patients unable to...   More >

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience Colloquium: Feng-Kuei

Colloquium | March 29 | 4:10 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 5101 Tolman


Whitney Lab Blitz

Department of Psychology


Whitney Lab Blitz: Feng-Kuei

Thursday, March 31, 2016

Cognition Colloquium: "Statistical models of learning and using semantic representations”

Colloquium | March 31 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Warner Brown Room, 3201


Josh Abbott

Department of Psychology


Josh Abbott will present his exit talk titled,"Statistical models of learning and using semantic representations.”

Monday, April 4, 2016

Earclub: “Hidden Hearing Loss: Synaptopathy in noise-induced and age-related cochlear damage”

Colloquium | April 4 | 4-6 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3105 (Beach Room)


M. Charles Liberman, Dept. of Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School and Eaton-Peabody Laboratories, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.

Department of Psychology


The classic view of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is that the “primary” targets are hair cells, and that cochlear-nerve loss is “secondary” to hair cell degeneration. Our recent work in mouse and guinea pig has challenged that view. In noise-induced hearing loss, exposures causing only reversible threshold shifts (and no hair cell loss) nevertheless cause permanent loss of >50% of...   More >

Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Thursday, April 7, 2016

Cognition Colloquium: Identifying stereotype threat in an online math tutor through behavioral classification.

Colloquium | April 7 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Warner Brown Room, 3201


Rachel Jenson, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Rachel Jenson will be presenting her original research "Identifying stereotype threat in an online math tutor through behavioral classification."

Monday, April 11, 2016

Earclub: What's Different about Perceptually Organized Stimuli?

Colloquium | April 11 | 4-6 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Beach Room, 3105


Dennis McFadden, University of Texas Ashbel Smith Professor Emeritus in Experimental Psychology

Department of Psychology


Logic, intuition, and anecdote suggest that commonly encountered stimuli are processed differently from less commonly encountered stimuli. The processing becomes more rapid, more efficient. The implication is that the brain develops short-cuts in the processing of familiar, commonly encountered stimuli. For convenience, let us call these short-cuts templates and let us assume that over the course...   More >

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience Colloquium: Sasha Kauffman

Colloquium | April 12 | 4:10 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 5101 Tolman


Sasha Kauffman, University of California, San Diego

Department of Psychology


Host: Lance Kriegsfeld

Sasha Kauffman will be giving a talk on "Unraveling the neural mechanisms controlling ovulation: insight from rodent models."

Thursday, April 14, 2016

Cognition Colloquium

Colloquium | April 14 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Warner Brown Room, 3201


Mariel Goddu, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Mariel Goddu will be presenting her original research.



Neural circuits controlling sleep

Seminar | April 14 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Yang Dan, University of California, Berkeley

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience Colloquium: Lisa Johnson and Vinitha Rangarajan

Colloquium | April 19 | 4:10 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 5101 Tolman


Lisa Johnson; Vinitha Rangarajan

Department of Psychology


Knight Lab Blitz

Thursday, April 21, 2016

Cognition Colloquium

Colloquium | April 21 | 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Warner Brown Room, 3201


Alex Carstensen, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Alex Carstensen will present her original research.

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience Colloquium: Anne Collins

Colloquium | April 26 | 4:10 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 5101 Tolman


Anne Collins, University of California, Berkeley

Department of Psychology

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Cognition Colloquium: Priming structural forms across domains with property induction

Colloquium | April 28 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Warner Brown Room, 3201


Sophia Sanborn, UC Berkeley

Department of Psychology


Sophia Sanborn will be presenting her original research "Priming structural forms across domains with property induction."



Thursday, May 5, 2016

Thursday, May 19, 2016