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Monday, October 29, 2018

Vision to Action: Towards a Cellular-Resolution Atlas of the Zebrafish Visual and Visuomotor System

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | October 29 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Herwig Baier, Department Genes – Circuits – Behavior, Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology, 82152 Martinsried, Germany

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Understanding brain-wide neuronal dynamics and behavior requires a detailed map of the underlying circuit architecture. We built an interactive cellular-resolution atlas of the zebrafish brain, with a focus on the visual and visuomotor system, and generated from our dataset an inter-areal wiring diagram, which serves as ground truth for synapse-scale, electron microscopic reconstructions. We have...   More >

Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Opportunities and challenges of high-field fMRI for neuroscience applications

Colloquium | October 31 | 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West


Kendrick Kay, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


In this talk, Dr. Kendrick Kay will describe two recent projects that exploit functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at ultra-high magnetic field strength (7 Tesla). The first project consisted of whole-brain fMRI retinotopic mapping in 181 healthy adults, as part of the Human Connectome Project (T2*-weighted gradient-echo EPI, 1.6-mm isotropic resolution, 1-s TR, 85 slices, multiband...   More >



Opportunities and challenges of high-field fMRI for neuroscience applications

Seminar: ICBS Seminar | October 31 | 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West


Kendrick Kay, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


In this talk, I will describe two recent projects that exploit functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at ultra-high magnetic field strength (7 Tesla). The first project consisted of whole-brain fMRI retinotopic mapping in 181 healthy adults, as part of the Human Connectome Project (T2*-weighted gradient-echo EPI, 1.6-mm isotropic resolution, 1-s TR, 85 slices, multiband acceleration 5,...   More >

Thursday, November 1, 2018

Information Storage in Memory Engrams

Seminar | November 1 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Tomas Ryan, Trinity College Dublin, School of Biochemistry and Immunology,

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Adversarial Examples that Fool both Computer Vision and Time-Limited Humans

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | November 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Gamaleldin Elsayed, Google Brain

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Machine learning models are vulnerable to adversarial examples: small changes to images can cause computer vision models to make mistakes such as identifying a school bus as an ostrich. However, it is still an open question whether humans are prone to similar mistakes. Here, we address this question by leveraging recent techniques that transfer adversarial examples from computer vision models...   More >

Friday, November 9, 2018

Attentional Episodes and Cognitive Control

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | November 9 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West


John Duncan, MRC Cognition & Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract: Human fMRI studies show a tightly-localised set of “multiple-demand” or MD regions, involved in solution of many different cognitive challenges, widely separated yet strongly functionally connected, and linked to standard measures of fluid intelligence. Multiple-demand regions are generally associated with “cognitive control”, but how should control be conceived? Using data from...   More >

Thursday, November 15, 2018

How do Astrocytes Sculpt Synaptic Circuits?

Seminar: HWNI/MCB Seminar | November 15 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Li Ka Shing Center


Cagla Eroglu, Duke University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


How are synaptic networks formed during development and remodeled during learning and disease? This is the main question that drives our research. In particular, we investigate the roles of glial cells called astrocytes in the development, remodeling and function of synaptic circuits. In my talk, I will share findings from my lab on two distinct molecular mechanisms through which astrocytes...   More >

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Division of Immunology and Pathogenesis

Seminar | November 27 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Jun R. Huh, Harvard University

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Thursday, November 29, 2018

Convergent circuitry for thermoregulation

Seminar | November 29 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Lily Jan, University of California, San Francisco

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Thursday, December 6, 2018

Division of Neurobiology and H.Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | December 6 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


James Trimmer, University of California, Davis, Department of Pharmacology

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH