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Wednesday, September 26, 2018

A New Benchmark and Progress Toward Improved Weakly Supervised Learning

Seminar: Redwood Seminar | September 26 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall


Russ Webb, Apple

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


A primary goal of this work is to give a clear example of the limits of current, deep-learning techniques and suggest how progress can be made. The presentation will include a discussion of open questions, unpublished experiments, suggestions on how to make progress. This work is founded on the paper Knowledge Matters: Importance of Prior Information for Optimization by Gulcehre et. al., which...   More >



Repairing the brain after stroke: a biomaterials strategy

Seminar | September 26 | 12-1 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall


Tatiana Segura, Duke University

Bioengineering (BioE)


Stroke is the leading cause of disability due to the brain’s limited capacity to regenerate damaged tissue. After stroke, an increased inflammatory and immune response coupled with severely limited angiogenesis and neuronal growth results in a stroke cavity devoid of normal brain tissue. However, stroke also induces the formation of a pro-repair/plastic region in the area adjacent to the stroke...   More >

Friday, September 28, 2018

Monday, October 1, 2018

(Computer) Vision without Sight: Finding, Reading, and Magnifying Text

Seminar: Oxyopia Seminar | October 1 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall


Roberto Manduchi, Professor of Computer Engineering, UC Santa Cruz

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Reading is a pervasive activity in our daily life. We read text printed on books and documents, shown on directional signs and advertisement, and displayed on computer and smartphone screens. People who are blind can read text using OCR on their smartphone; those with low vision may magnify onscreen content. But these tasks are not always easy. Reading a document with OCR requires taking a...   More >

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Berkeley ACM A.M. Turing Laureate Lecture: Towards a Conscious AI: A Computer Architecture Inspired by Neuroscience

Colloquium | October 17 | 4-5 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium


Manuel Blum, UC Berkeley

Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)


Thanks to major advances in neuroscience, we are on the brink of a scientific understanding of how the brain achieves consciousness. This talk will describe neuroscientist Bernard Baars' Global Workspace Model (GWM) of the brain, its implications for understanding consciousness, and a novel computer architecture that it inspires. The Model gives insight for the design of machines that truly...   More >

Thursday, October 18, 2018

Division of Neurobiology and H. Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | October 18 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Adam Kepecs

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Monday, October 29, 2018

Vision to Action: Towards a Cellular-Resolution Atlas of the Zebrafish Visual and Visuomotor System

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | October 29 | 4-5 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center


Herwig Baier, Department Genes – Circuits – Behavior, Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology, 82152 Martinsried, Germany

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Understanding brain-wide neuronal dynamics and behavior requires a detailed map of the underlying circuit architecture. We built an interactive cellular-resolution atlas of the zebrafish brain, with a focus on the visual and visuomotor system, and generated from our dataset an inter-areal wiring diagram, which serves as ground truth for synapse-scale, electron microscopic reconstructions. We have...   More >

Thursday, November 1, 2018

Information Storage in Memory Engrams

Seminar | November 1 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Tomas Ryan, Trinity College Dublin, School of Biochemistry and Immunology,

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Friday, November 9, 2018

Attentional Episodes and Cognitive Control

Seminar: Neuroscience Seminar | November 9 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West


John Duncan, MRC Cognition & Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


Abstract: Human fMRI studies show a tightly-localised set of “multiple-demand” or MD regions, involved in solution of many different cognitive challenges, widely separated yet strongly functionally connected, and linked to standard measures of fluid intelligence. Multiple-demand regions are generally associated with “cognitive control”, but how should control be conceived? Using data from...   More >

Thursday, November 15, 2018

How do Astrocytes Sculpt Synaptic Circuits?

Seminar: HWNI/MCB Seminar | November 15 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 177 Li Ka Shing Center


Cagla Eroglu, Duke University

Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills


How are synaptic networks formed during development and remodeled during learning and disease? This is the main question that drives our research. In particular, we investigate the roles of glial cells called astrocytes in the development, remodeling and function of synaptic circuits. In my talk, I will share findings from my lab on two distinct molecular mechanisms through which astrocytes...   More >

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Division of Immunology and Pathogenesis

Seminar | November 27 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Jun R. Huh, Harvard University

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Thursday, November 29, 2018

Convergent circuitry for thermoregulation

Seminar | November 29 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


Lily Jan, University of California, San Francisco

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Thursday, December 6, 2018

Division of Neurobiology and H.Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | December 6 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition


James Trimmer, University of California, Davis, Department of Pharmacology

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology


This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH