Skip to main content.
Advanced search >
Print

Spring 2015

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

How to Write a Research/Grant Proposal

Workshop | January 14 | 10:30-11:30 a.m. | 9 Durant Hall


Dr. Wendy Muse Sinek, Office of Undergraduate Research

Office of Undergraduate Research


This workshop will cover the basics of writing a research proposal. To get the most out of the workshop, come with an idea for a research project in mind.


Faculty, Students - Graduate, Students - Undergraduate

Faculty, Students - Graduate, Students - Prospective, Students - Undergraduate

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

CANCELED - PChem Seminar

Seminar | January 20 | 4-5 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall | Canceled


Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of Georgia

Department of Chemistry


Coffee and Refreshments served at the "Coffee Lab" B38 Hildebrand - available @ 3:50pm

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Professional Email Communication: (or: how to email your professor so you get a favorable response!)

Workshop | January 21 | 4-5 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall


Dr. Wendy Muse Sinek, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

Office of Undergraduate Research


This workshop will teach you how to present yourself professionally over email to faculty and other professionals so that you make a great first impression.

Friday, January 23, 2015

Multi-Scale Biofabrication Strategies for Tissue Engineering and Cell Biology: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | January 23 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building


Prof. Deok-Ho Kim, Univ. of Washington, Bioengineering

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


Living tissues are intricate ensembles of multiple cell types embedded in a complex, well-defined extracellular environment. In this talk, I will present our multi-scale biofabrication strategies directed towards better understanding of physical influences of the extracellular environment on cellular and multi-cellular form and function.

Inspired by ultrastructural analysis of native tissue...   More >

Monday, January 26, 2015

Reconstitution of T Cell Signaling

Seminar | January 26 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall


Professor Ronald D. Vale, Deptartment of Cellular & Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco

Department of Chemistry


Coffee & Refreshments served on lower level Stanley Hall @3:50pm-4:10pm

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Molecular Semiconductors: Management of Charge and Spin

Seminar | January 27 | 4-5 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall


Professor Sir Richard Friend, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge

Department of Chemistry


Coffee and Refreshments served at the "Coffee Lab" B38 Hildebrand - available @ 3:50pm

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

How to Write a Research/Grant Proposal

Workshop | January 28 | 4-5 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall


Dr. Wendy Muse Sinek, Office of Undergraduate Research

Office of Undergraduate Research


This workshop will cover the basics of writing a research proposal. To get the most out of the workshop, come with an idea for a research project in mind.


Faculty, Students - Graduate, Students - Undergraduate

Faculty, Students - Graduate, Students - Prospective, Students - Undergraduate

Thursday, January 29, 2015

Computational Biology Seminar: Dr. Chris Cotsapas, "Combining Genetics and Genomics to Gain Biological Insights"

Seminar | January 29 | 1-2 p.m. | 177 Stanley Hall


Dr. Chris Cotsapas, Department of Neurology, Yale School of Medicine

Center for Computational Biology


As genetic and genomic studies become routine, new approaches are required to wrest biological insights from these data. These approaches must address the multifactorial nature of complex traits, the gene regulatory effects likely driving much of that architecture, and recognize that mechanisms can be used in multiple cell types across many contexts.

Friday, January 30, 2015

Synthetic Biology to New Chemistry: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | January 30 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building


Prof. Michelle C. Chang, UC Berkeley, Chemistry Department

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


Living systems have evolved the capacity to carry out many chemical transformations of interest to synthetic chemistry -- if they could be redesigned for targeted purposes.

One particularly interesting behavior observed in nature is the ability of directional-sensing bacteria to construct chains of magnetite nanocrystals using a specialized organelle. Our group is interested in studying and...   More >

Monday, February 2, 2015

Professional Email Communication: (or: how to email your professor so you get a favorable response!)

Workshop | February 2 | 3-4 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall


Dr. Wendy Muse Sinek, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

Office of Undergraduate Research


This workshop will teach you how to present yourself professionally over email to faculty and other professionals so that you make a great first impression.

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Kenneth S. Ptizer lecture: Molecular Pumps and Motors in Biology

Seminar | February 3 | 4-5 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall


Professor Gerhard Hummer, Department of Theorectical Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics

Department of Chemistry


Coffee and Refreshments served at the "Coffee Lab" B38 Hildebrand - available @ 3:50pm

Friday, February 6, 2015

Recent Progress in the Study of Single Molecule Chemistry at the Nanometer Length Scale and Picosecond Time Scale: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | February 6 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building | Note change in date


Prof. Richard P. Van Duyne, Northwestern University, Chemistry / BioE / Physics

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


During the last few years, there has been an explosion of interest and activity in the field of plasmonics. The goal of plasmonics is to control and manipulate light on the nanometer length scale using the properties of the collective electronic excitations in noble metal films or nanoparticles, known as surface plasmons. An improved understanding of the interactions between adsorbed molecules...   More >

Monday, February 9, 2015

Choosing a Research Topic

Workshop | February 9 | 4-5 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall


Dr. Wendy Muse Sinek, Office of Undergraduate Research

Office of Undergraduate Research


This workshop is designed to help you turn a general area of interest into a focused, feasible, and interesting research topic. Over the course of an hour, you will identify your academic interests and learn techniques to help you select among them.


Students - Undergraduate

Faculty, Students - Graduate, Students - Prospective, Students - Undergraduate



CRISPR Biology: From Foundational Research to Translational Technology

Seminar | February 9 | 4-5 p.m. | tba Stanley Hall


Professor Jennifer Doudna, Departments of Molecular & Cell Biology & Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley

Department of Chemistry


Coffee & Refreshments served on lower level Stanley Hall @3:50pm-4:10pm

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Nanocrystal Assemblies: a Modular Approach to Materials Design

Seminar | February 10 | 4-5 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall


Professor Dmitri V. Talapin, Department of Chemistry

Department of Chemistry


Coffee and Refreshments served at the "Coffee Lab" B38 Hildebrand - available @ 3:50pm



Friday, February 13, 2015

Nanoscale Science’s Role in Translational Medicine: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | February 13 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building


Prof. Kevin Healy, UC Berkeley, MSE and BioE

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


My group is primarily interested in the biophysics and dynamics of bioinspired stem cell microenvironments and molecular therapeutics to control stem cell lineage specification and self-organization into microtissues or organs.

Our work focuses on cell-materials interactions that are controlled by bimolecular engagement and substrate modulus, and subsequent signaling events. Accordingly, our...   More >



Annual Chinese New Year's Banquet: Center for Chinese Studies

Social Event | February 13 | 6-9 p.m. |  King Tsin Restaurant (厚德福)


1699 Solano Avenue, Berkeley (Albany), CA 94707

Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)


Happy Lunar New Year! Please join the Center for Chinese Studies for our annual celebration of Chinese New Year.

$30 faculty and community, $15 students and UC staff. RSVP and prepayment required. Contact Angel Ryono at ccs-vs@berkeley.edu or 510-643-6322.


All Audiences

All Audiences

We will continue to post updates on this event announcement page: a) the price of the dinner banquet, b) complete menu for Feb 13th, c) public transportation directions, etc. If you have questions, please do not hesitate to send an email to cc-vs@berkeley

You will need to make advanced payment to secure your seats at the dinner banquet. RSVP by February 9 by calling Angel Ryono at 510-643-3622, or by emailing Angel Ryono at ccs-vs@berkeley.edu.

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Atmospheric Peroxy Radical Chemistry of Isoprene: Impact on Oxidant Formation

Seminar | February 17 | 4-5 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall


Professor Paul O. Wennberg, Atmospheric Chemistry & Environmental Engineering, California Institute of Technology

Department of Chemistry


Coffee and Refreshments served at the "Coffee Lab" B38 Hildebrand - available @ 3:50pm

Friday, February 20, 2015

On-Demand Bioadhesives by Carbene Precursors: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | February 20 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building


Prof. Terry Steele, Nanyang Tech Univ., Singapore -- Materials Science

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


A significant need exists for bioadhesives that allow for clinical manipulation and subsequent adhesive activation on wet tissue surfaces. Ideally, the design should allow for incorporation into catheter-based laparoscopic and key hole surgeries to replace current methods of mechanical fixation. The existing methods for tissue adhesion and fixation employ century-old techniques from the sewing...   More >



Femtosecond Excited-state Dynamics of First-row Transition Metal Complexes: Challenges and Opportunities in Solar Energy Conversion

Seminar | February 20 | 4-5 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall


Professor James McCusker, Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University

Department of Chemistry


Coffee and Refreshments served at the "Coffee Lab" B38 Hildebrand - available @ 3:50pm

Monday, February 23, 2015

Professional Email Communication: (or: how to email your professor so you get a favorable response!)

Workshop | February 23 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 9 Durant Hall


Dr. Wendy Muse Sinek, Office of Undergraduate Research and Scholarships

Office of Undergraduate Research


This workshop will teach you how to present yourself professionally over email to faculty and other professionals so that you make a great first impression.



"How do cells make the final cut? Surprising Insights into Cell Division from Near-Atomic Resolution CryoEM

Seminar | February 23 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall


Professor Adam Frost, Department of Biochemistry & Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco

Department of Chemistry


Coffee & Refreshments served on lower level Stanley Hall @3:50pm-4:10pm

Friday, February 27, 2015

Microfluidic System for Simultaneous Analyses of RNA and DNA in Single Cells: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | February 27 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building


Prof. Hirofumi Shintaku, Kyoto University, Micro Engineering

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


Single cell analyses have become powerful tools in the study of heterogeneous cell populations such as tumors and developing embryos. Isolation of RNA and DNA from the same single cell is crucial to create an opportunity for correlating mutation with gene expression at the single cell level.

However, it still remains challenging as RNA and DNA samples potentially cross-contaminate each other...   More >

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Life inside the cell: STORM, CRISPR and Imagenomics

Seminar | March 3 | 4-5 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall


Professor Bo Huang, Depts of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Biochemistry & Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco

Department of Chemistry


Coffee and Refreshments served at the "Coffee Lab" B38 Hildebrand - available @ 3:50pm

Friday, March 6, 2015

Bioinspired Design of Nanomaterials for Dynamic and Self-Healing Properties: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | March 6 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building


Prof. Zhibin Guan, UC Irvine, Chemistry

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


One research goal of my group is attempting to merge supramolecular chemistry and material chemistry for the design of advanced polymeric materials with dynamic properties.

Many natural biopolymers not only have advanced mechanical properties such as high modulus, toughness, and elasticity, but also exhibit dynamic properties. Inspired by Nature, we have designed a series of biomimetic...   More >



Glenn T. Seaborg Lecture (1 of 2): Actinide and Uranyl Redox Chemistry in Constrained Macrocyclic Environments

Seminar | March 6 | 4-5 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall


Professor Polly L. Arnold, School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh

Department of Chemistry


Coffee and Refreshments served at the "Coffee Lab" B38 Hildebrand - available @ 3:50pm

Friday, March 13, 2015

How Structure Matters in Thin Film Photovoltaic Materials: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | March 13 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building


Dr. Michael Toney, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


Due to the sheer abundance of available sunlight, solar energy will play a large part in developing carbon-free energy sources. To be truly scalable, solar cell materials must be Earth-abundant and require small energy input for manufacturing (i.e., sustainability), which drives the discovery and development of new solar materials.

In this talk, I will describe research done at SSRL on...   More >

Friday, March 20, 2015

MEMS Enabled Characterization of Nano Junctions and Biomolecular Motors: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | March 20 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building


Prof. Hiroyuki Fujita, Univ. of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


My research group has investigated MEMS fabrication and microactuators since 1986. Now those devices are applied to nano and bio technologies; this enables precise measurement of the mechanical, electrical, and chemical properties of nano/bio objects with simultaneous observation by optical or electron microscopy.

MEMS devices are inserted and operated in the specimen chamber of the...   More >

Monday, March 30, 2015

Student Hosted Seminar in Structural and Quantitative Biology: Machines of Protein Destruction

Seminar | March 30 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall


Professor Robert T. Sauer, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Department of Chemistry


Coffee & Refreshments served on lower level Stanley Hall @3:50pm-4:10pm

Friday, April 3, 2015

Hot Electron-mediated Chemical and Solar Energy Conversion on Metal-Oxide Nanostructures: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | April 3 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building


Prof. Jeong Young Park (박정영), Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology (KAIST), EEWS

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


It is known that a pulse of high kinetic energy electrons (1-3 eV) in metals can be generated after surface exposure to external energy, such as in the absorption of light or in exothermic chemical processes. These energetic electrons are not at thermal equilibrium with the metal atoms and are called “hot electrons”. The detection of hot electrons and understanding the correlation between hot...   More >

Friday, April 24, 2015

Continuous, Real-Time Detection of Biomolecules in Live Animals: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | April 24 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building


Prof. H. Tom Soh, UC Santa Barbara, Chemical Engineering / CNSI

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


A biosensor capable of continuously measuring specific molecules in the bloodstream in vivo would give clinicians a valuable window into patients’ health and their response to therapeutics. Unfortunately, continuous, real-time measurement is currently only possible for a handful of targets (i.e. glucose, lactose, and oxygen) and existing platforms for continuous measurement are not generalizable...   More >