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Spring 2015

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Physical Chemistry Seminar: Laser Spectroscopy of Reactive Intermediates in Helium Nanodroplets

Seminar | January 20 | 4-5 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall


Professor Gary Douberly, Department of Chemistry, University of Georgia

Department of Chemistry


Coffee and Refreshments served at the "Coffee Lab" B38 Hildebrand - available @ 3:50pm

Monday, January 26, 2015

Reconstitution of T Cell Signaling

Seminar | January 26 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall


Professor Ronald D. Vale, Deptartment of Cellular & Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco

Department of Chemistry


Coffee & Refreshments served on lower level Stanley Hall @3:50pm-4:10pm

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Physical Chemistry Seminar

Seminar | January 27 | 4-5 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall


Professor Sir Richard Friend, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge

Department of Chemistry


Coffee and Refreshments served at the "Coffee Lab" B38 Hildebrand - available @ 3:50pm

Friday, January 30, 2015

Synthetic Biology to New Chemistry: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | January 30 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building


Prof. Michelle C. Chang, UC Berkeley, Chemistry Department

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


Living systems have evolved the capacity to carry out many chemical transformations of interest to synthetic chemistry -- if they could be redesigned for targeted purposes.

One particularly interesting behavior observed in nature is the ability of directional-sensing bacteria to construct chains of magnetite nanocrystals using a specialized organelle. Our group is interested in studying and...   More >

Friday, February 6, 2015

Recent Progress in the Study of Single Molecule Chemistry at the Nanometer Length Scale and Picosecond Time Scale: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | February 6 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building | Note change in date


Prof. Richard P. Van Duyne, Northwestern University, Chemistry / BioE / Physics

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


During the last few years, there has been an explosion of interest and activity in the field of plasmonics. The goal of plasmonics is to control and manipulate light on the nanometer length scale using the properties of the collective electronic excitations in noble metal films or nanoparticles, known as surface plasmons. An improved understanding of the interactions between adsorbed molecules...   More >

Friday, February 20, 2015

Femtosecond Excited-state Dynamics of First-row Transition Metal Complexes: Challenges and Opportunities in Solar Energy Conversion

Seminar | February 20 | 4-5 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall


Professor James McCusker, Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University

Department of Chemistry


Coffee and Refreshments served at the "Coffee Lab" B38 Hildebrand - available @ 3:50pm

Friday, March 6, 2015

Glenn T. Seaborg Lecture (1 of 2): Actinide and Uranyl Redox Chemistry in Constrained Macrocyclic Environments

Seminar | March 6 | 4-5 p.m. |  Pitzer Auditorium, 120 Latimer Hall


Professor Polly L. Arnold, School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh

Department of Chemistry


Coffee and Refreshments served at the "Coffee Lab" B38 Hildebrand - available @ 3:50pm

Monday, March 30, 2015

Student Hosted Seminar in Structural and Quantitative Biology: Machines of Protein Destruction

Seminar | March 30 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall


Professor Robert T. Sauer, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Department of Chemistry


Coffee & Refreshments served on lower level Stanley Hall @3:50pm-4:10pm

Friday, April 24, 2015

Continuous, Real-Time Detection of Biomolecules in Live Animals: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | April 24 | 2-3 p.m. | 390 Hearst Memorial Mining Building


Prof. H. Tom Soh, UC Santa Barbara, Chemical Engineering / CNSI

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute


A biosensor capable of continuously measuring specific molecules in the bloodstream in vivo would give clinicians a valuable window into patients’ health and their response to therapeutics. Unfortunately, continuous, real-time measurement is currently only possible for a handful of targets (i.e. glucose, lactose, and oxygen) and existing platforms for continuous measurement are not generalizable...   More >