<< February 2019 >>

Friday, February 1, 2019

SOLD OUT - Gallery Talk: Joseph Banks and the Golden Age of Botanical Exploration

Lecture | February 1 | 10-11:30 a.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Sir Joseph Banks (1743 – 1820) was an English naturalist and botanist who accompanied Captain James Cook on his first voyage to the Pacific. During the expedition, 30,000 plants were collected and The Banks Florilegium was created but not published until 1989. Banks is credited for introducing the genera Acacia, Banksia and Eucalyptus to the Western world. Approximately 80 species of plants were...   More >

$12, $10 members (Price includes Garden Admission)

 SOLD OUT.

Pathways to STEM: with Dr. Gentry Patrick

Lecture | February 1 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 245 Li Ka Shing Center

 Professor Gentry Patrick, UC San Diego

 College of Letters & Science

How does one take a kid from Compton on a life journey and academic career path to Professor in Neurobiology at UC San Diego by way of UC Berkeley (B.A.), Harvard University (Ph.D.), and postdoctoral studies at California Institute of Technology?

The answer is simple: Access, Mentorship and Advocacy!

Professor Patrick is dedicated to driving the overall vision for the PATHS Program, a pilot...   More >

The Devil Really is in the Details: Why Specificity Matters in Understanding the Global Radical Right

Lecture | February 1 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues), Wildavsky Conference Room

 Brian Porter-Szűcs, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of History, University of Michigan

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Center for Right-Wing Studies

There are obvious similarities between Vladimir Putin, Viktor Orbán, Recep Erdoğan, Jair Bolsonaro, Jarosław Kaczyński, Rodrigo Duterte, Donald Trump, and all the other politicians we have come to call ‘populists.’ Not only is that label misleading, but analyzing them as part of a single ideological movement can lead to confusion. This presentation will use the example of Poland to...   More >

Tainted Garments: The Exploitation of Women and Girls in India’s Home-based Garment Sector: Research Launch Event

Lecture | February 1 | 12-1:30 p.m. | B100 Blum Hall

 Siddharth Kara, The Blum Center for Developing Economies

 Blum Center for Developing Economies, Institute for South Asia Studies

The Blum Center for Developing Economies & Institute of South Asia Studies invites you to the launch of the report "Tainted Garments: The Exploitation of Women and Girls in India’s Home-based Garment Sector" by Blum Center Research Fellow and renowned anti-trafficking expert Siddharth Kara. Lunch will be provided (RSVP required).

Kara's report offers the most comprehensive investigation yet...   More >

Women's Activism in Cold War Pakistan: A Transnational History

Lecture | February 1 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 602 Barrows Hall

 Elora Shehabuddin, Associate Professor of Humanities and Political Science, Rice University

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies, The Subir & Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies

My current project traces the history of successive generations of urban Muslim Bengali women activists over the second half of the twentieth century. This allows me to examine how they have negotiated their identities—as Bengali, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, Third World, secular, religious, and Muslim—at different moments and how transnational interactions and international interventions have shaped...   More >

Saturday, February 2, 2019

Career Clinic: Finding a New Career Direction: Steps to Finding Work You Love

Lecture | February 2 | 9 a.m.-3 p.m. | UC Berkeley Extension (SF Campus at 160 Spear St.), Room 613

 Rebecca Andersen, Career Services at the UC Berkeley Information School; RuthAnn Haffke, UC Berkeley School of Public Health

 UC Berkeley Extension

Do you feel like you are in a rut in your career and long to do something that feels more fulfilling, even if you have no idea what that might be? Do you know you're in the wrong job but feel stuck by fear or self-doubt when you think about trying to make a change?

This workshop is tailored to help you find direction and outline steps to find (and achieve!) work you love.

In advance of the...   More >

$50 $50 plus Strengthfinder Assessment

  Register online

Monday, February 4, 2019

Design Field Notes: August de los Reyes

Lecture | February 4 | 4-5 p.m. | 220 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

August de los Reyes works as a Design Director at Google where he leads a team dedicated to harnessing technologies in the service of human well-being. Prior to joining Google, August led design at Pinterest and at Xbox for Microsoft. August is an active champion of Inclusive Design in the tech arena, as well as a pioneer in the Natural User Interface.

The Cutting Edge: Theory and the Avant-Garde in Ljubljana

Lecture | February 4 | 4-6 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Kaitlyn Tucker, Humanities Teaching Fellow, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Chicago

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

This talk examines the historical relationship between the Ljubljana School and the avant-garde. Beginning in 1967 with Slavoj Zizek’s and Rastko Mocnik’s first forays into concrete poetry and concluding with the School’s involvement in the Neue Slowenische Kunst movement during the 1980s, the talk analyzes the Ljubljana School's engagement with avant-garde aesthetics, and ultimately...   More >

New York Times Deputy Editor Julie Bloom at the Berkeley Forum

Lecture | February 4 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 125 Morrison Hall

 Julie Bloom, New York Times

 The Berkeley Forum

In the first half of the twentieth century, the average New York Times editor might never see California, the average New York Times reader might not have either. Much has changed since then. The Times now has more than two dozen journalists based up and down the state and more readers in the state than anywhere else in the country, including New York. Ms. Bloom will talk about the evolution of...   More >

$0

  Buy tickets online

The Paris Review: Women at Work

Lecture | February 4 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Emily Nemens

 Arts + Design, Department of English, Art of Writing Program at the Townsend Center for the Humanities, Journalism School, Bay Area Book Festival

What does it mean to be a woman at work in the creative arts in 2019? The Paris Review's new editor, Emily Nemens, reflects on this question through the lens of the storied literary quarterly's Writers at Work interview series, the work of contemporary contributors, and her own creative practice as a writer and illustrator.

Emily Nemens joined The Paris Review as editor in 2018. Stories...   More >

Tuesday, February 5, 2019

"We want bread and roses!": Trade union feminism across borders: a comparative perspective on 1970s Italian and French experiences

Lecture | February 5 | 12 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Anna Frisone, Visiting Scholar and Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of History, UC Berkeley

 Institute of European Studies, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Department of History

Second-wave feminism is internationally known for its choice of refusing any engagement with gender-mixed political organizations, in favor of a deep commitment into women-only collectives. However, some women stubbornly decided to introduce a feminist approach within male-dominated organizations such as the trade unions, interrogating their allegedly neutral but on the contrary deeply gendered...   More >

Experiencing Language, Language Education and Social Justice in Times of Violence and Resistance

Lecture | February 5 | 3-5 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, B-4 (Classroom side)

 Robert Train, Sonoma State University

 Berkeley Language Center

Attacking education has long been a staple food in the conservative political regimen of the “culture wars” in the US. However, the assault on higher education takes an increasingly troubling and openly violent texture in the Trump era, particularly for immigrants and Latinos. In this talk, I will examine impacts of Trumpian discourse on how we language educators may address structural and...   More >

Political Economy of Reforms in Europe’s Neighborhood

Lecture | February 5 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220

 Sergei Guriev, Chief Economist, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Continuing economic convergence in Europe’s neighborhood requires further structural reforms. We will discuss the political economy of reforms in specific transition countries including Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Uzbekistan.

The Assault on Empathy: The Promise of a Friction-Free Life: Charles M. and Martha Hitchcock Lectures by Sherry Turkle

Lecture | February 5 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Sherry Turkle, Professor of the Social Studies of Science and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 Graduate Division

Sherry Turkle will present the Hitchcock lectures on February 5 and February 6, 2019. The first lecture is titled "The Assault on Empathy: The Promise of a Friction-Free Life" and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Food Politics 2019: Food Policy in the Trump Era with Marion Nestle

Lecture | February 5 | 6-8 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center | Note change in location

 Graduate School of Journalism, Berkeley Food Institute, UC Berkeley-11th Hour Food and Farming Journalism Fellowship

Please join us for a special lecture series with celebrated author and scholar Marion Nestle. "Food Politics 2019: Food Policy in the Trump Era" What’s happening under the Trump administration to policies aimed at solving problems of undernutrition, obesity, and the effects of food production on the environment?

  RSVP online

Photo: Bill Hayes

Wednesday, February 6, 2019

GPR and Gradiometry in the Hyper-Arid Atacama: Assessing Features Among Fossil Channels, Paleosols, and Lithic Dispersions at Quebrada Mani 35, Chile

Lecture | February 6 | 12-1 p.m. |  2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Nicholas Tripcevich, Lab Manager, Archaeological Research Facility; Scott Byram, Owner, Feature Survey, Inc; José M. Capriles, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, The Pennsylvania State University; Calogero M. Santoro, Professor of Archaeology, Instituto de Alta Investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Chile

 Archaeological Research Facility

In the hyper-arid core of the Atacama Desert in northern Chile dozens of Terminal Pleistocene archaeological sites have been located in an area that previously held seasonal surface water channels and a riparian landscape. We present preliminary results from recent geophysical research at the site of Quebrada Mani 35.

Labor Regimes of Indenture – A Global Overview of Migrant Domestic Work

Lecture | February 6 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 554 Barrows Hall

 Rhacel Parreñas, University of Southern California

 Department of Ethnic Studies, Center for Race and Gender, Institute for Labor Relations and Employment

Across the globe, migrant domestic workers are unfree workers whose legal residency is contingent on their continued employment as a live-in worker with a designated sponsor. This talk examines the politics of their indenture. Providing a macro and micro perspective, it begins with a global overview of the incorporation of migrant domestic workers as indentured workers in key host countries in...   More >

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat with Michael Nylan: The Chinese Pleasure Book

Lecture | February 6 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Nylan explores the concept of “pleasure”—including both short-term delight and longer-term satisfaction—as understood by major thinkers of ancient China.

The Color of Law

Lecture | February 6 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison St, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Richard Rothstein, Haas Institute

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

A forgotten history of how our government segregated America.

When Scientists Write for the Public: Objective Consideration of Contemporary Phenomena

Lecture | February 6 | 2-3 p.m. | Calvin Laboratory (Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing), Calvin Lab auditorium

 Konstantin Kakaes, The Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing

 Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing

Science is complicated. So too are mathematics and engineering. (This talk will speak of these subjects as “science”, despite the imprecision in doing so, without loss of generality.) Most people do not understand most things—even scientists working in any given discipline often understand little about the work of their colleagues across campus.

Some popular writing by scientists is...   More >

How Artificial Intelligence Is Reshaping Repression: With Prof. Steven Feldstein, Frank and Bethine Church Chair of Public Affairs at Boise State University and fellow, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace’s Democracy and Rule of Law Program.

Lecture | February 6 | 2:15-3:30 p.m. | 10 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Steven Feldstein, Boise State University

 Human Rights Center

Repressive regimes are implementing AI systems, accelerating the global resurgence of authoritarianism and a new era of surveillance and control. To counter both the spread of high-tech repression abroad and potential abuses at home, policy makers in democratic states must think seriously.

  RSVP online

Towards an Equitable Data-Driven Urbanism: Transforming Urban Theory and Practice via Data Science

Lecture | February 6 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Karen Chapple

 Information, School of

The availability of new forms of data on different aspects of everyday life, analyzed and shared via new data analytics, has created an opportunity to depart from the old routines of data collection, cleaning, variable construction, and regression analysis. Working with fine-grained, real-time data has inspired a new generation of researchers eager to design smarter cities (despite the cautions...   More >

Towards an Equitable Data-Driven Urbanism: Transforming Urban Theory and Practice via Data Science

Lecture | February 6 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Karen Chapple

 Data Sciences

In this talk, Professor Karen Chapel uses the lens of my Urban Displacement Project to explore how new sources of data, such as geotagged Twitter data, upend our traditional understandings of neighborhood change, while also facilitating new forms of participatory action research and global comparative case studies.

The Assault on Empathy: The Promise of Artificial Intimacy: Charles M. and Martha Hitchcock Lectures by Sherry Turkle

Lecture | February 6 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Sherry Turkle, Professor of the Social Studies of Science and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 Graduate Division

Sherry Turkle will present the Hitchcock lectures on February 5 and February 6, 2019. The second lecture is titled "The Assault on Empathy: The Promise of Artificial Intimacy" and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Thursday, February 7, 2019

Peach Blossom Land: A Film by Stan Lai

Lecture | February 7 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Stan Lai

 Arts + Design

Written and directed by A+D Thursdays series co-curator Stan Lai, The Peach Blossom Land (1992) is the award winning film adaption of his groundbreaking 1986 play Secret Love in Peach Blossom Land. The film radically challenged the principles of filmed theater, featuring remarkable innovations in staging, the use of song and dialogue, and the convention of the "fourth wall." Two theater companies...   More >

Sustainable Vikings - A Talk by Dr. Robert Strand

Lecture | February 7 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Dr. Robert Strand, Center for Responsible Business at Berkeley Haas

 Institute of European Studies, Center for Responsible Business, Nordic Studies Program

How have the Nordics come to dominate virtually all measurements of sustainability? From the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to the Dow Jones Sustainability Index (DJSI), Nordic countries and companies always command the top - or very near the top - of sustainability measurements. Join Robert Strand as he shares lessons he has drawn from over 15 years of inquiry in the Nordic region and...   More >

Dr. Robert Strand

Shoroon Bumbagar: Tombs with Mounds in Central Mongolia

Lecture | February 7 | 4 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Nancy S. Steinhardt 
, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Pennsylvania

 Patricia Berger, History of Art, UC Berkeley, Emerita

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative

The talk begins with a tomb often known as Shoroon Bumbagar that was excavated in Bayannuur, Bulgan province, Mongolia, in 2011. Covered with murals but without an inscription or other information about its date, the tomb is studied alongside the better known tombs such as Pugu Yitu’s (d. 678), only five kms away, and tombs of Tang China and Sogdiana. Before drawing conclusions, the talk turns...   More >

The Crooked, Windy, Pothole-Filled Road To Success

Lecture | February 7 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Dr. Geetha Murali, Room to Read

 Institute of International Studies

Scripted career paths are over-rated, according to Dr. Geetha Murali, CEO of global nonprofit Room to Read. Instead of following an overly scripted career path, Murali advises you to assess opportunities as you go and identify where you can add the most value based on your skill set or an acquirable skill set. Then contribute effectively towards organizational priorities and beyond to become a...   More >

Chinese Animal Gods

Lecture | February 7 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Meir Shahar, Tel Aviv University

 Center for Buddhist Studies

Our ancestors depended upon beasts of burden for a living. In the Chinese case this dependence was reflected in the religious sphere. Chinese religion featured deities responsible for the wellbeing of draft animals. The two principal ones were the Horse King (divine protector of equines) and the Ox King (tutelary deity of bovines). This lecture will examine the ecological background and...   More >

The Politics of Truth: A Way Forward: Arlie Hochschild and Thomas Laqueur in Conversation

Lecture | February 7 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities, Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, Department of History, Department of Sociology

Arlie Hochschild and Thomas Laqueur discuss the contributions that academic scholars can make to the public understanding of truth and its relation to politics.

Settlement, Culture, Identity in the Pale of Pylos: Sather Lecture Series: A Bronze Age Greek State in Formation

Lecture | February 7 | 8 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maud Fife Room (315 Wheeler Hall)

 Jack L. Davis, Blegen Professor of Greek Archaeology, University of Cincinnati

 Department of Classics

Internationally recognized scholar of Bronze Age Greece offers a series of lectures showing how the archaeological record sheds light on culture and communal life of early Greece.

Friday, February 8, 2019

The Ethnobotany of Eden: The Colonial Quest for Green Gold in the Humid Tropics with Robert A. Voeks

Lecture | February 8 | 10-11:30 a.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

The colonial era witnessed a fevered quest for the healing flora of the equatorial latitudes. Subscribing to ancient Eden notions of plant-people relations, European physicians and scientists were motivated by the belief that God had planted botanical cures for diseases in their places of origin. While many colonial bioprospectors subscribed to the biblical Doctrine of Signatures, they discovered...   More >

$12, $10 members (Price includes Garden Admission)

  Register online

Minner Distinguished Lecture: Engineering Ethics in Action: Experiences from the Medical Device Industry

Lecture | February 8 | 12-1 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium, 3rd floor

 Tim Guertin, EECS ‘72, Vice-Chairman of the Board of Directors, Varian Medical Systems

 College of Engineering, Bioengineering Honor Society

Adapting to climate change: Generating new science-based design typologies

Lecture | February 8 | 12-1 p.m. | 534 Davis Hall

 Dr. Kristina Hill, Associate professor, Department of landscape architecture & environmental planning and urban design, UC Berkeley

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

Queer Expectations: a genealogy of jewish women's poetry

Lecture | February 8 | 12 p.m. |  Maude Fife Room Wheeler Hall

 Zohar Weiman-Kelman

 Center for the Study of Sexual Culture

Zohar Weiman-Kelman will be discussing their recently published book, Queer Expectations: a Genealogy of Jewish Women’s Poetry (SUNY Press, 2018). Bringing together Jewish women’s poetry in English, Yiddish, and Hebrew from late nineteenth century through the 1970s, this talk will explore how Jewish women writers turned to poetry to write new histories.

Sarah Pinto | The Doctor and Mrs. A.: Ethics and Counter-Ethics in an Indian Dream Analysis

Lecture | February 8 | 2-4 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conference Room)

 Sarah Pinto, Professor of Anthropology, Tufts University

 Lawrence Cohen, Professor in Anthropology and South and Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Townsend Center Working Group on Form and Formalism, Townsend Center for the Humanities Lecture Grant, The Berkeley South Asia Art Initiative

A talk by Professor Sarah Pinto, Professor of Anthropology at Tufts University.

Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science: A Planet-Scale Playground for Data Scientists – Google Maps: Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science

Lecture | February 8 | 2-3 p.m. | Doe Library, 190 Doe Library

 Data Sciences

Are there good soba noodle places nearby? How do I get to JFK by train? In this talk, Google Vice President of Engineering Luiz André Barroso and Google Earth Engine Co-founder Matt Hancher will describe the technical complexity of creating models that reflect the real world for tools such as Google Maps, Search and Google Earth.

A planet-scale playground for data scientists - Google Maps: Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science

Lecture | February 8 | 2:10-3 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Luiz André Barroso, VP of Engineering, Google

 Matt Hancher, Co-founder, Google Earth Engine, Google

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

Are there good soba noodle places nearby? How do I get to JFK by train? When does this park close? Show me Stonehenge! Helping people explore and get things done in the real world is the task our team has taken on, and it is a rather challenging one. In this talk I will describe the technical complexity of creating models that reflect the real world for tools such as Google Maps, Search and...   More >

Monday, February 11, 2019

Seismic Performance of Existing Tall Steel Framed Buildings

Lecture | February 11 | 12-1 p.m. | 502 Davis Hall

 Robert Pekelnicky, SE, Principal, Degenkolb Engineers

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

AHMA Colloquium - Structured space, structured time, structured things: making digital research data reusable

Lecture | February 11 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 308A Doe Library

 Adam Rabinowitz, University of Texas at Austin

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

This paper is part of a larger lecture series entitled "Digital Humanities and the Ancient World." The series is co-sponsored by the Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology (AHMA) Colloquium and the Townsend Center for the Humanities.

Berkeley Lectures in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering presented by The Dow Chemical Company: Traditional Fluid Flow Configurations: Unexpected Responses

Lecture | February 11 | 4-6 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Howard Stone, Professor, Princeton University

 Department of Chemical Engineering

The flows of complex fluids link fundamental research questions to potential applications, both in industry and for understanding natural phenomena. In this talk I discuss two research questions that we have studied recently: (1) Although flows at modest Reynolds numbers at a T-shaped junction is a geometry where one should expect everything is known, nevertheless we uncover previously...   More >

Beyond heteronormativity: Queer archaeology in Japan

Lecture | February 11 | 4-6 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Jun Mitsumoto, Associate Professor of Archaeology and Museum Studies, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, and Center for Research on the Dynamics of Civilizations, Okayama University, Japan

 Archaeological Research Facility, Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Department of Anthropology

This presentation focuses on issues of heteronormativity in Japanese archaeology, using case studies regarding same-sex relationships and cross-dressing in prehistoric and protohistoric Japan to explore how such practical studies can oppose heteronormative interpretations, and what new information and perspectives can be gained through a reconstruction of the past.

Beyond heteronormativity: Queer archaeology in Japan

Lecture | February 11 | 4-6 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Jun Mitsumoto, Associate Professor of Archaeology and Museum Studies, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, and Center for Research on the Dynamics of Civilizations, Okayama University, Japan

 Archaeological Research Facility, Department of Anthropology

This presentation focuses on issues of heteronormativity in Japanese archaeology, using case studies regarding same-sex relationships and cross-dressing in prehistoric and protohistoric Japan to explore how such practical studies can oppose heteronormative interpretations, and what new information and perspectives can be gained through a reconstruction of the past.

Design Field Notes: Karen Nakamura

Lecture | February 11 | 4:30-5:30 p.m. | 220 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Karen Nakamura is a cultural and visual anthropologist who researches disability in contemporary Japan at the University of California, Berkeley. Her first project was on sign language, identity, and deaf social movements and resulted in a monograph and edited volume. After that, her second project was on schizophrenia and community-based recovery in Japan and this resulted in a book, its...   More >

News of the Future and the Future of News

Lecture | February 11 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Osher Theater, BAMPFA

 Kevin Delaney, Quartz

 Berkeley Center for New Media, Graduate School of Journalism

Kevin J. Delaney is editor in chief and co-CEO of Quartz, the global business news site at qz.com. Kevin cofounded Quartz in 2012 and has led its pioneering approach to journalism, which has won many awards and attracted a readership around the world. Prior to Quartz, Kevin was a Wall Street Journal reporter for a decade, with postings in Paris and San Francisco. He was managing editor of...   More >

News of the Future and the Future of News

Lecture | February 11 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Kevin Delaney

 Berkeley Center for New Media, Graduate School of Journalism

Berkeley Center for New Media

Kevin J. Delaney is editor in chief and co-CEO of Quartz, the global business news site at qz.com. Kevin cofounded Quartz in 2012 and has led its pioneering approach to journalism, which has won many awards and attracted a readership around the world. Prior to Quartz, Kevin was a Wall Street Journal reporter for a decade, with postings in Paris and San Francisco....   More >

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Plants and People Lunchtime Lectures: The Ethnobotany of a Medicinal Moss

Lecture | February 12 | 12-1 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

As a part of our "Year of Ethnobotany" celebrations, the Garden will be hosting monthly lunch time lectures featuring the research of UC Berkeley graduate students, post-docs, and faculty.

In February join, Eric Harris to learn all about mosses and their use in human life.

Free with Garden Admission

  Register online or by calling 510-664-7606

Sustainability – Why and How? The Nordic Way

Lecture | February 12 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Ambassador Ove Ullerup, Royal Danish Embassy in Sweden

 Institute of European Studies, Center for Responsible Business, Nordic Studies Program

In his talk, the Danish ambassador to Sweden, Ove Ullerup, will focus on the relationship and cooperation between the public and private sector on the sustainability agenda in the Nordic countries.
The ambassador discusses challenges in changing concepts and how the Nordic countries will face these in the future. What role will the UN Sustainable Development Goals play and have they changed our...   More >

Ove Ullerup

Restraining Great Powers: Soft Balancing From Empires To The Global Era

Lecture | February 12 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 T.V. Paul, McGill University

 Institute of International Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Institute for South Asia Studies

This presentation is based on the book with the same title (Yale University Press, 2018) which examines a crucial element of state behavior -- the use of international institutions, informal alignments and economic instruments such as sanctions -- to constrain the power and threatening behavior of dominant actors. Much of International Relations scholarship fails to capture the use of these...   More >

Sincerity out, Authenticity in: Poetry on the Quest for Trust in the times of Post-Truth

Lecture | February 12 | 5:30-7 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Stanislav Lvovsky, Auhtor

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Back then in the first half of 1990s new generation of Russian poets, — or its considerable part — found itself facing the challenge of inventing a new way to speak straightforwardly: readily available poetics either weren’t quite fit for the job or themselves were part of the problem to be resolved. Poetry optics, which has emerged at the time in the capacity of the solution, was the “new...   More >

Discovery and Diversity: Critical Factors in Tomorrow's Health Care: Dean of the Stanford School of Medicine Lloyd B. Minor

Lecture | February 12 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 125 Morrison Hall

 Lloyd B. Minor, Stanford University School of Medicine

 The Berkeley Forum

How are medical schools adapting to today's greatest challenges? Join the Dean of Stanford University School of Medicine, Lloyd B. Minor M.D., for a discussion on the ways in which medical education is changing and responding to unique social demands. Dean Minor will specifically discuss the challenges in biomedical discovery and the vital importance of diversity in science, while showcasing how...   More >

$0

  Buy tickets online

Food Politics 2019: Nutrition Science Under Siege with Marion Nestle

Lecture | February 12 | 6-8 p.m. | North Gate Hall, Logan Multimedia Center (Room 142)

 Graduate School of Journalism, Berkeley Food Institute, UC Berkeley-11th Hour Food and Farming Journalism Fellowship

Please join us for a special lecture series with celebrated author and scholar Marion Nestle. "Food Politics 2019: Nutrition Science Under Siege." Nutrition science is under attack from statisticians and the food industry. Who stands to gain and what might be lost?

  RSVP online

Surprising Evidence:: Revealing Vanished Landscapes Through Nontraditional Moving Images

Lecture | February 12 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Wurster Hall, Wurster Auditorium, RM 112

 Rick Prelinger, University of California, Santa Cruz

 Environmental Design Archives

Join us for our second Gallery Talk!

Tuesday, February 12, 2019
Wurster Auditorium, Room 112

6:30 to 7pm - Light Refreshments
7 to 8pm - Lecture

Free to UC Berkeley Students, Staff, Faculty, and Friends of the EDA

Suggested $10 donation for those outside UC Berkeley


Historians, architects and planners often look to feature films as records of extinct environments. But few know...   More >

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

“Bringing the War Home”: Visual Aftermaths and Domestic Disturbances in the Era of Modern Warfare

Lecture | February 13 | 12-2 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Caren Kaplan, Professor of American Studies, University of California, Davis

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies

At the close of the First Gulf War, feminist architectural historian Beatriz Colomina wrote that “war today speaks about the difficulty of establishing the limits of domestic space.” That conflict of 1990-91 is most often cited as the first to pull the waging of war fully into the digital age and therefore into a blurring of boundaries of all kinds.

The Exeter Anthology: Codicological Grace and Integrative Poetics

Lecture | February 13 | 12 p.m. | 306 Wheeler Hall

 John Niles, Professor Emeritus, UC Berkeley

 Department of English

A brown-bag presentation by John Niles on his most recent book *God's Exiles and English Verse: On the Exeter Anthology of Old English Poetry.*

HearstCAVE: Immersive Visualization and Student Discovery Experiences

Lecture | February 13 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Chris Hoffman, Associate Director, Research IT

 Archaeological Research Facility

This talk explores the role that visualization walls, photogrammetry, and virtual reality can play in research, scholarship, and student engagement, highlighting a series of projects led by Research IT and the Hearst Museum of Anthropology with a growing set of partners on campus and beyond.

Reimagining Labor Law

Lecture | February 13 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison St, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Catherine Fisk, Berkeley Law

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

Transformation of work through the gig economy and through the decline of unions presents unprecedented challenges for regulating work for the common good. But it also presents opportunities for a fresh start. This lecture will examine some of the recent radical changes in the law of the workplace in California and nationwide.

Berkeley Lectures in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering presented by The Dow Chemical Company: Seeking Intersections Between Disciplines: “Boundaries” in Multiphase Flows

Lecture | February 13 | 4-6 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Howard Stone, Professor, Princeton University

 Department of Chemical Engineering

Fluid dynamics is a discipline with a long history, and has a distinctive feature that it links engineering, mathematics and physics, and provides many avenues for intersections with biology. In this talk I will provide one view of the ways that mechanics, and in particular fluid dynamics, yields insights into a wide variety of "multiphase" flow problems. The talk will begin with brief examples...   More >

Howison Lectures in Philosophy Presented by Philip Kitcher: Progress in the Sciences and in the Arts

Lecture | February 13 | 4:10 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Philip Kitcher, John Dewey Professor of Philosophy, Columbia University

 Graduate Division

Philip Kitcher will present the Howison Lecture on February 13, 2019. The lecture is titled "Progress in the Sciences and in the Arts," and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Total Medicine: An Approach to the Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Medical Texts

Lecture | February 13 | 5 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 John Niles, Professor Emeritus, Berkeley English

 Medieval Studies Program

When we enter the realm of Anglo-Saxon medicine we find ourselves in a landscape of total war, with all the curative plants of the earth and all beneficent animal extracts aligned with the physician, angels, archangels, and the almighty God against the attacks of wyrms, elves, witches, and flying venoms. We are also in a pre-Scholastic environment of experimental science where the curative...   More >

Reetika Khera | Dissent on Aadhaar: Big Data Meets Big Brother

Lecture | February 13 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conference Room)

 Reetika Khera, Associate Professor, Economics and Public Systems Group, the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad

 Lawrence Cohen, Professor in Anthropology and South and Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by Walter Hakala, Associate Professor in the Asian Studies Program and Department of English at the University at Buffalo, SUNY, and author of Negotiating Languages: Urdu, Hindi, and the Definition of Modern South Asia, published by Columbia University Press.

Docent Lecture: Berkeley Rep's "Paradise Square"

Lecture | February 13 | 5-5:45 p.m. | 330 Wheeler Hall

 Dee Kursh, Berkeley Repertory Theatre

 Berkeley Repertory Theatre

Come hear more about Berkeley Repertory Theatre's new musical, "Paradise Square: A New Musical."

It’s 1863 and in a 20-block area of Manhattan known as the Five Points, Black and Irish Americans live side by side, work together, marry, and for a brief period realize racial harmony. However, the intensifying Civil War soon results in the first-ever Federal draft, leading to riots as whites are...   More >

JOINT ARCHITECTURE + AIA EAST BAY LECTURE: ALICE KIMM | JOHN FRIEDMAN ALICE KIMM ARCHITECTS

Lecture | February 13 | 7:30-9 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, FEB 13, 7:30pm. Please join us for a talk with the co-founder and principal of JFAK, an internationally recognized firm based in Los Angeles. Co-sponsored by AIA East Bay. Open to all!

Thursday, February 14, 2019

The Undefeated Heart: Buddhism and Performance and Practice with Joe Goode

Lecture | February 14 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Joe Goode

 Arts + Design

Joe Goode will talk about how Buddhist philosophy has changed his working process from a preordained “vision” process to one of discovery. Goode is Artistic Director of Joe Goode Performance Group with whom he has performed in the U.S., Canada, Africa, South America, and the Middle East. His performance installations have been commissioned by the Krannert Art Museum, the M. H. DeYoung Museum,...   More >

The Globotics Upheaval: Globalization, Robotics, and the Future of Work

Lecture | February 14 | 3-4:30 p.m. | Haas School of Business, Spieker Forum, Chou Hall

 Richard Baldwin, Graduate Institute, Geneva

 Clausen Center for International Business and Policy

Automation and robotics are changing our lives quickly - everyone knows that. But digital disruption goes much further. In The Globotics Upheaval, Richard Baldwin, one of the world's leading globalisation experts, explains that exponential growth in computing, transmission and storage capacities is also creating a new form of "virtual" globalisation that could undermine the foundations of...   More >

Undocumented Lives: The Untold Story of Mexican Migration

Lecture | February 14 | 4 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Ana Raquel Minian

 Center for Latin American Studies

In this talk, Professor Minian explores circular migration, which reshaped communities in the United States and Mexico, and shares stories of Mexicans who have been used and abused by economic and political policies of both countries.
Ana Raquel Minian is Assistant Professor of History and of Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity at Stanford University.

A migrant farm worker in Virginia who returns to Mexico every year on a H2A visa. (Photo by Laura Elizabeth Pohl/Bread for the World.)

Optimization for Machine Learning

Lecture | February 14 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 210 South Hall

 Yifan Sun

 Information, School of

How good data models facilitate optimization and generalization in machine learning.

Modernism in Wartime: Avant-Gardes, Revolutions, Poetries

Lecture | February 14 | 5-7 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife

 Vincent Sherry, Howard Nemerov Professor of the Humanities, Washington University in St.Louis

 C. D. Blanton, Associate Professor, UC Berkeley Department of English; Catherine Flynn, Associate Professor, UC Berkeley Department of English; Donna Jones, Associate Professor, UC Berkeley Department of English

 Department of English, Institute of European Studies, Townsend Center for the Humanities

Vincent Sherry will speak about the experience of the First World War from the vantage of an international avant-garde, considering the alternate temporalities of the radical time of the prewar avant-garde event and the long and lengthening durée of the conflict. How does an avant-garde poetry respond to this difference, and what is the longer story of revolution it tells?

Farm and Field: Sather Lecture Series: A Bronze Age Greek State in Formation

Lecture | February 14 | 5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Jack L. Davis, Blegen Professor of Greek Archaeology, University of Cincinnati

 Department of Classics

Internationally recognized scholar of Bronze Age Greece offers a series of lectures showing how the archaeological record sheds light on culture and communal life of early Greece.

Friday, February 15, 2019

Outsiders: The History of Refugees in an Enlarged Europe

Lecture | February 15 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Philipp Ther, Professor of Central European History, University of Vienna

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Refugees have permeated European history and the receiving states and societies have almost always profited from taking them in. This talk analyzes the major causes of mass flight and the oft traumatic journeys en route. Tracing the paths of the refugees, the narrative crosses the Mediterranean and the Atlantic, and so provides a wider vision of European history that includes the United States....   More >

The key legal concepts that engineers face in environmental site remediation

Lecture | February 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 534 Davis Hall

 Dr. Morgan Gilhuly, Environmental attorney at Barg Coffin

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

There's the Rub: Making Art and Scholarship Bang: A Conversation between Xandra Ibarra and Juana María Rodríguez

Lecture | February 15 | 12-2 p.m. |  Durham Studio Theater (Dwinelle Hall)

 Xandra Ibarra; Juana María Rodríguez

 Center for the Study of Sexual Culture

Join us for a presentation of work by artist Xandra Ibarra and a dialogue between Ibarra and Professor Juana María Rodríguez about the nexus of art, performance and scholarship.

CANCELED Walter Hakala | Vernacular Literacy and the Urdu Public Text: Examples from Gujarat and the Deccan

Lecture | February 15 | 2-4 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conference Room) | Canceled

 Walter Hakala, Associate Professor, Asian Studies Program, Department of English, University at Buffalo, SUNY

 Gregory Maxwell Bruce, Lecturer in Urdu, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Urdu Initiative

A talk by Walter Hakala, Associate Professor in the Asian Studies Program and Department of English at the University at Buffalo, SUNY, and author of Negotiating Languages: Urdu, Hindi, and the Definition of Modern South Asia, published by Columbia University Press.

Can Social Media Be Used As a Teaching Tool?: A Conversation With Pierre Lévy on Twitter

Lecture | February 15 | 2:30-3:30 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Ana Elisa S. C. S. Ferreira, Visiting Scholar, Berkeley Language Center

 Berkeley Language Center

In Spring 2018, Ana Elisa S. C. S. Ferreira coordinated a project called #askplevy at Instituto Federal Campus Cubatão (Brazil). During 3 months, professors, students, and staff used Twitter to post questions about education and technology to professor and author Pierre Lévy.

Mapping Race, Gendering Place: African American Roots Tourism in Bahia, Brazil

Lecture | February 15 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Patricia Pinho

 Center for Latin American Studies

This talk will examine the major intersecting tropes that inform African American roots tourism in Brazil and demonstrate how the gendering of space, place, and time are tied to the geopolitics of the black diaspora.

Patricia de Santana Pinho is Associate Professor of Latin American and Latino Studies at UC Santa Cruz

(Mapping Diaspora: African American Roots Tourism in Brazil. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.)

Saturday, February 16, 2019

Science at Cal Lecture - Is anybody out there?

Lecture | February 16 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 131 Campbell Hall

 Dan Werthimer, Berkeley SETI Research Center

 Science@Cal

Are Fast Radio Bursts signals from ET? Or are they signals from magnetars? Is `Oumuamua an alien space ship? Or is it a rock from another solar system? Are we alone in the universe? Current and future SETI projects may provide an answer.Berkeley SETI Research Center chief scientist Dan Werthimer will describe the rationale for past and future searches and will show how new technologies are...   More >

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Ethnobotanical Insights into Biblical Life and Language

Lecture | February 19 | 10-11:30 a.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Metaphors drawn from nature and daily life helped the ancient Israelites to connect with the Bible, but modern readers often find them remote and difficult to understand. Why, for example, was Noah told to build an ark of “gopher wood”? There is no tree by that name. How did wormwood (Artemisia spp.) come to symbolize social corruption? What characteristics made olive trees the model of care for...   More >

$12, $10 UCBG members (Price includes Garden Admission)

  Register online

Investigation and Prosecution of Environmental Crime as a Crime Against Humanity with Flaviano Bianchini

Lecture | February 19 | 2:45-4 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Goldberg Room, 297 Simon Hall

 Flaviano Bianchini, Source International

 Human Rights Center

Flaviano Bianchini is the founder and director of
Source International, which works with communities
facing environmental pollution and health problems
principally caused by extractive industries. They
provide high-level technological and scientific
support free of charge to partner communities,
helping them to assess damage to resources and
promote restorative actions.
Bianchini’s...   More >

  RSVP online by February 19.

The Struggle for Cuba: Race and Empire in the 18th-century Atlantic World

Lecture | February 19 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Elena Schneider

 Center for Latin American Studies

In this talk, Elena Schneider will discuss her recent book The Occupation of Havana: War, Trade, and Slavery in the Atlantic World, as well as the broader theme of the relationship between Anglo-American imperialism and racial struggle in Cuba.

Elena Schneider is Assistant Professor in the Department of History at UC Berkeley.

(Image courtesy of UNC Press.)

Bowen Lectures: Lecture 1: Symmetries of polynomial equations

Lecture | February 19 | 4:10-5 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 James McKernan, UC San Diego

 Department of Mathematics

The symmetries of systems of polynomial equations can be be understood in terms of the geometry of the variety of zeroes (or solution set) of the polynomials. Roughly speaking, there are 3 kinds of geometries corresponding to positive, zero and negative curvature giving rise to 3 different kinds of symmetry groups. In this lecture, I will discuss recent advances in algebraic geometry that lead to...   More >

Faiz Ahmed | Afghanistan Rising: Islamic Law and Statecraft between the Ottoman and British Empires

Lecture | February 19 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Faiz Ahmed, Associate Professor of History, Brown University

 Wali Ahmadi, Associate Professor of Persian Literature, Dept. of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Urdu Initiative, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Center for British Studies

A talk by Assistant Professor of History at Brown University, Dr. Faiz Ahmed on his new book, Afghanistan Rising: Islamic Law and Statecraft between the Ottoman and British Empires.

“my petites madeleines are water canisters” : The Genres, Images, and Intertexts of Bosnia’s Remembered War

Lecture | February 19 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Antje Postema, Lecturer, Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian Language, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

In Bosnia and Hercegovina, wartime artistic patterns of genre, image, and intertextual reference have set the terms for postwar memory-making. These versatile, enduring patterns also illuminate the reciprocal influence of memory and art in Bosnia from the 1990s to the present.

While wartime authors like Semezdin Mehmedinovic and Ozren Kebo infused the practical, didactic genres of the map and...   More >

Food Politics 2019: An Agenda for the Food Movement with Marion Nestle

Lecture | February 19 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center | Note change in location

 Graduate School of Journalism, Berkeley Food Institute, UC Berkeley-11th Hour Food and Farming Journalism Fellowship

Please join us for a special lecture series with celebrated author and scholar Marion Nestle. "Food Politics 2019: An Agenda for the Food Movement." Recent government policy changes are eroding programs aimed at feeding the hungry, curbing obesity, and protecting the environment. What can consumers and citizens do?

 We are at capacity for the event on 2/12. RSVP online

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Making Space for the Invisible

Lecture | February 20 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Michael Chazan, Professor of Anthropology, University of Toronto

 Archaeological Research Facility

This talk will consider the role of the invisible in human engagement with artifacts. This discussion draws heavily on comparative psychology research on the capacity of chimpanzees for abstract though in both the social (sense of self) and physical realms, as well as on Tim Ingold’s critique of hylomorphy. The first context in which hominins drew on invisibles was in the use of fracture for...   More >

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat with Diego Pirillo: The Refugee-Diplomat: Venice, England, and the Reformation

Lecture | February 20 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Pirillo offers a new history of early modern diplomacy, centered on Italian religious refugees who left Italy in order to forge ties with English and northern European Protestants in the hope of inspiring an Italian Reformation.

Who Are You?: Racial Classification and the Census

Lecture | February 20 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison St, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Michael Omi, Berkeley Law

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

How are individuals and groups racially classified, what are the meanings attached to different racial categories, and what impact do these categories have on a range of policies and practices? Taking the U.S. Census as a site of racial classification, we'll examine shifting state definitions of race and how individuals and groups negotiate different racial categories and identities.

The Mechanisms of Direct and Indirect Rule: Colonialism and Economic Development in Africa

Lecture | February 20 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Natalie Letsa, University of Oklahoma

 Center for African Studies

A number of studies have found that British colonialism—specifically its policy of indirect rule—improved economic development relative to the French policy of direct rule. There is less consensus, however, as to why indirect rule would produce better economic outcomes. We argue that indirect rule produced better economic outcomes because it was more likely to decentralize decision-making, which...   More >

Neoliberal Assemblages of Economy, Body and Society: Politics of Microfinance and Disability Pensions in India

Lecture | February 20 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 116 Haviland Hall

 Dr. Vandana Chadhry

 Social Welfare, School of, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, Institute for South Asia Studies

Abstract: My research investigates the effects of neoliberal governance on disability and development policies in the context of postcolonial India. Through the ethnographic study of disability-oriented microfinance self-help group projects of the World Bank and digitally regulated state disability pension programs in rural districts of the South Indian state of Telangana, I analyze the changing...   More >

Bowen Lectures: Lecture 2: On the birational classification of algebraic varieties

Lecture | February 20 | 4:10-5 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Christopher Hacon, University of Utah

 Department of Mathematics

Algebraic varieties are geometric objects defined by polynomial equations. The minimal model program (MMP) is an ambitious program that aims to classify algebraic varieties. According to the MMP, there are 3 building blocks: Fano varieties, Calabi-Yau varieties and varieties of general type which are higher dimensional analogs of Riemann Surfaces of genus 0,1 or at least 2 respectively. In this...   More >

The Charisma Machine: The Life, Death, and Legacy of One Laptop per Child

Lecture | February 20 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Morgan G. Ames

 Information, School of

The One Laptop per Child project failed. So why do the same utopian visions that inspired it still motivate other projects to âdisruptâ education and development?

Artist and Curator: Silvia Gruner in conversation with Tarek Elhaik

Lecture | February 20 | 5:30-7:30 p.m. | Dwinelle Annex, Room 126

 Silvia Gruner

 Arts Research Center

Artist & Curator: Silvia Gruner in conversation with Tarek Elhaik
Wednesday, February 20, 2019
5:30-7:30pm
Dwinelle Annex, Room 126

Co-sponsors: Arts Research Center and UCHRI.

ARCHITECTURE LECTURE: JOE HALLIGAN | ASSEMBLE

Lecture | February 20 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, FEB 20, 6:30pm. Please join us for a talk with Joe Halligan of Assemble, a multi-disciplinary collective working across architecture, design and art. Presented by Room 1000. Open to all!

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Bancroft Library Roundtable: Migrants in the Making: Invisible Agricultural Child Labor and the Limits of Citizenship, 1938-1965

Lecture | February 21 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Ivón Padilla-Rodríguez, PhD candidate in History at Columbia University and Visiting Dissertation Research Scholar at the UC Berkeley Latinx Research Center

 Bancroft Library

Farm work is the most hazardous industry for young workers. Yet, despite the implementation of a national child labor ban in 1938, Latinx children continue to toil in fields nationwide with an estimated 200,000-500,000 agricultural child laborers employed each year. Ivón Padilla-Rodríguez has identified the child labor ban's agricultural exemption as the reason for this disjuncture.

 The Lewis-Latimer Room has a maximum capacity of 28 people. The doors will be shut and no more attendees may enter once the room is at capacity.

Emerging Scholar Lecture: Jaih Craddock, "Social Interactions as a Mechanism in HIV Prevention"

Lecture | February 21 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Haviland Hall, Commons/116

 Social Welfare, School of

Black women account for over 60% of all new HIV incidences among women in the United States. The highest rates of HIV acquisition occur among Black women aged 25 and over, thus examining factors that may be associated with HIV risk among young Black women aged 18 to 24 is critical for HIV prevention efforts.

Martha Graham Speaking to the Moment: Creative Invention in Dance with Marni Thomas Wood

Lecture | February 21 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Marni Thomas Wood

 Arts + Design

After graduating from Sarah Lawrence College in 1958, Marni Thomas Wood joined the Martha Graham Dance Company, toured and performed with the Company, taught at the Graham School, and was privileged to be part of the first generation of women to perform Ms. Graham’s own roles as Graham began choosing successors for her earlier repertory reconstructions. In 1968, with her husband/partner David...   More >

It’s not a NATURAL disaster: looking from past to future through archaeology

Lecture | February 21 | 4:30-6:30 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Margaret Nelson, Professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change and Distinguished Sustainability Scholar in the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability, Arizona State University

 Archaeological Research Facility

In this talk, Nelson looks at rare climate challenges and human-created vulnerabilities in the long-term history/prehistory of seven areas and evaluates the magnitude of changes to food security and social conditions following extreme climate events. Results of these analyses support the role of human-created vulnerabilities in the occurrence of “disasters” associated with climate extremes.

Future Reading: What Is Anglophone Fiction in the 21st Century?

Lecture | February 21 | 4:30-6:30 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife room

 Rebecca L. Walkowitz, Professor and Chair, Department of English, Rutgers English

 Grace Lavery, Assistant Professor, Berkeley English

 Colleen Lye, Associate Professor, Berkeley English

 Harsha Ram, Associate Professor, Slavic Languages and Literatures

 Department of English, Townsend Center for the Humanities, John F Hotchkis Chair in English

Mongol ‘Translations’ of a Nepalese Stupa: Architectural Replicas and the Cult of Bodnāthe Stūpa/Jarung khashar in Mongolia

Lecture | February 21 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Isabelle Charleux, CNRS, Paris

 Tang Center for Silk Road Studies, Mongolia Initiative, Center for Buddhist Studies

The cult of the Nepalese stupa of Bodnath (Tib. and Mo. Jarung Khashor) was very popular in 19th and early 20th century Mongolia and especially in Buryatia, as testifies the translation into Mongolian of a famous guidebook to Bodnath, a corpus of Mongolian oral narratives, the many thang-kas and amulets depicting the Bodnath Stupa along with a Tibetan prayer, and the existence of architectural...   More >

The Longue Durée of 1989. Regime Change and Everyday Life in East Germany

Lecture | February 21 | 5-6 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Kerstin Brückweh, Centre for Contemporary History, Potsdam (Germany)

 Institute of European Studies, GHI West - Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC, Center for German and European Studies

1989 is often considered a key caesura of the 20th century. By looking at the long-term developments surrounding this historic event Brückweh analyzes the social changes that paved the way for and shaped all three stages: the late phase of the German Democratic Republic, the peaceful revolution, and the transformation that followed. Property, especially real estate, serves as an example to examine...   More >

Kerstin Brückweh

Editing The Code Of Life: The Future Of Genome Editing

Lecture | February 21 | 5-6:30 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Dr. Jennifer Doudna

 Institute of International Studies

Our technological capacity to make changes to genomic data has expanded exponentially since the 2012 discovery of CRISPR-Cas9 as an RNA-programmable genome editing tool. Over the past seven years, this genome editing platform has been used to revolutionize research, develop new agricultural crops, and even promises to cure genetic diseases. However, ethical and societal concerns abound, requiring...   More >

A Truly Prehistoric Archaeology: Sather Lecture Series: A Bronze Age Greek State in Formation

Lecture | February 21 | 5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Jack L. Davis, Blegen Professor of Greek Archaeology, University of Cincinnati

 Department of Classics

Internationally recognized scholar of Bronze Age Greece offers a series of lectures showing how the archaeological record sheds light on culture and communal life of early Greece.

Robbins Collection Annual Lecture in Jewish Law, Thought, and Identity: Jewish Law and the #MeToo Movemement: A Feminist Perspective

Lecture | February 21 | 5:30-7:30 p.m. | 100 Boalt Hall, School of Law

 Rachel Adler

 Berkeley Institute for Jewish Law and Israel Studies, Robbins Collection

Rachel Adler is the David Ellenson Professor of Modern Jewish Thought at Hebrew Union College, Los Angeles. She pioneered in integrating feminist perspectives into interpreting Jewish texts and law. Her book Engendering Judaism (1998) is the first by a female theologian to win a National Jewish Book Award for Jewish Thought. Rabbi Adler has a PhD in Religion and Social Ethics from University of...   More >