<< April 2018 >>

Monday, April 2, 2018

Prithvi Datta Chandra Shobhi | Are Lingayats Hindus?

Lecture | April 2 | 12-2 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Prithvi Datta Chandra Shobhi, Professor of History at the Karnataka State Open University, Mysore

 Vasudha Paramasivan, Assistant Professor of Hindi Literature, Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by Prithvi Datta Chandra Shobhi, a social historian, who taught humanities and South Asian cultures at San Francisco State University.

Imagining the City: Magnesia and Brasilia

Lecture | April 2 | 4-6 p.m. | 308A Doe Library

 Gábor Betegh, University of Cambridge

 Department of Classics

The Pasts and Futures of Queer Marxism

Lecture | April 2 | 4-6 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Petrus Liu, Associate Professor of Chinese and Comparative Literature, and Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies, Boston University

 Department of English, Department of Comparative Literature, Department of East Asian Languages & Cultures

As the neoliberal crisis has brought about new conditions of vulnerability, precarity, and disposability, there is a resurgence of critical interest in the meeting points between queer theory and Marxism, two intellectual traditions that have previously been characterized as analytically distinct, historically successive, and even politically incompatible. While intellectual projects aimed at...   More >

A talk by Timothy Harrison

Lecture | April 2 | 5-7 p.m. | 306 Wheeler Hall

 Timothy Harrison, Assistant Professor, University of Chicago, Department of English Language and Literature

 Department of English, Medieval and Early Modern Coloquium

Public Radio in the Digital Age

Lecture | April 2 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 125 Morrison Hall

 John Boland, KQED

 The Berkeley Forum

As journalism becomes increasingly digital, KQED has engaged in a reinvention of public media to serve the rapidly changing needs of the American public. At KQED, John Boland has led a strategic transformation from a traditional public broadcasting service to a twenty-first century public media organization that combines mobile, social and online media with robust digital radio and television...   More >

Free

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ARCH Lecture: Carme Pinós

Lecture | April 2 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (2155 Center St)

 College of Environmental Design

MON, APR 2, 6:30pm. Please join us for a Berkeley Architecture / Arts + Design joint lecture with the 2018 Berkeley-Rupp Professor about her award-winning work. Located at the BAMPFA Osher Theater. Doors open at 6pm. Free and open to the public!

Carme Pinós, recent works

Lecture | April 2 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Carme Pinos, Principal of Estudio Carme Pinos

 Arts + Design

For over 20 years, the studio founded and led by Carme Pinós has undertaken outstanding national and international projects, working on creations within very diverse contexts, frameworks, programs and scales in countries such as Mexico, Austria and France. Currently, it is one of Spain’s most prolific award-winning architecture firms.

Estudio Carme Pinós works on a wide range of typologies -...   More >

Tuesday, April 3, 2018

What’s the problem with populism? Defining Contemporary Populism’s Challenge to Liberal Democracy

Lecture | April 3 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Ludvig Norman, Swedish Institute of International Affairs in Stockholm

 Institute of European Studies

It is commonly argued, in academic and popular debate alike, that contemporary populism presents liberal democracy with a set of challenges. However, the definitional confusion over populism has made the study of this phenomenon difficult and has prevented a clear discussion on what, if anything, is the problem with populism. This talk offers a way to rethink contemporary populism with a view to...   More >

Ernest S. Kuh Distinguished Lecture: Creating Materials that do not Exist in Nature

Lecture | April 3 | 12-1 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium, 3rd floor

 Xiang Zhang, Ph.D. 96' ME, Professor of Mechanical Engineering

 College of Engineering

Youth Civic Culture, Inequality, and Education in the ex-Communist Countries

Lecture | April 3 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Gabriel Badescu, Professor of Political Science, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj, Romania

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

The health of a democracy depends on the support for key political values such as civil rights, as well as the active participation of an informed citizenry. Less than two decades ago, young people in the ex-communist countries were more enthusiastic than the older generations about protecting norms and institutions that have traditionally been regarded as necessary ingredients for democratic...   More >

Jonathan Haidt Presents: 'The three worst ideas in the world, and how they shape American education'

Lecture | April 3 | 4:15 p.m. | 310 Sutardja Dai Hall

 Jonathan Haidt, New York University Stern School of Business

 Department of Political Science & The Baxter Liberty Initiative

Jonathan Haidt is a social psychologist at New York University Stern School of Business and the director of Heterodox Academy. He is the coauthor of the forthcoming book, 'The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting up a Generation for Failure'.

A Papyrological Pioneer: Investigations into the Life and Career of Josiah Gilbart Smyly: CTP Distinguished Lecture

Lecture | April 3 | 5:30 p.m. | 101 Doe Library

 Brian McGing, Regius Professor of Greek, Trinity College Dublin

 Center for the Tebtunis Papyri

J. Gilbart Smyly (1867-1948), friend and collaborator of Tebtunis excavators Bernard Grenfell and Arthur Hunt, was one of the pioneers of papyrology and responsible for deciphering and interpreting numerous papyri from the Berkeley collection and elsewhere. But he was a reclusive figure, little appreciated at his own institution, Trinity College Dublin, where he worked in the shadow of the...   More >

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

A Talk with Gregory Sholette

Lecture | April 4 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Gregory Sholette, Associate Professor, Queens College CUNY

 Arts + Design

Gregory Sholette is an artist, activist and author. He is the author of Dark Matter: Art and Politics in the Age of Enterprise Culture (Pluto, 2010) and Delirium and Resistance: Activist Art and the Crisis of Capitalism (Pluto 2017) He writes on the histories of Political Art, Artists collectives and social practice. He co-founded two artists' collectives: Political Art Documentation and...   More >

“Institutional Nightmare”: The Visual Culture of Mass Incarceration

Lecture | April 4 | 12-2 p.m. | 602 Barrows Hall

 Nicole R. Fleetwood, Associate Professor in the Department of American Studies, Rutgers University

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Center for Race and Gender, Department of African American Studies

In her lecture, Professor Fleetwood explores various aesthetic practices of incarcerated artists and activists to produce art about the U.S. prison regime and how prison shapes life-world possibilities of people impacted. The talk examines how furtive planning and artistic tactics of appropriating items owned by the state and claiming state resources and spaces are maneuvered.

Flintknapping: Merging Mind and Body

Lecture | April 4 | 12-1 p.m. |  2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Felicia De Pena, University of California, Berkeley Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

My work is focused on situating the transmission of flintknapping knowledge between mobile Epipaleolithic hunter-gatherer peoples of the Levant through chaîne opératoire. By refitting bladelet cores at Kharaneh IV, I strive to identify how individuals learned to flintknap, from raw material acquisition through the production of the final tool. I view the knowledge transmission process as a proxy...   More >

Eastern Prussia 2.0: Persistent Regions, Rising Nations

Lecture | April 4 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Maria Polugodina, Freie Universitaet Berlin

 Institute of European Studies

There is much literature stressing border persistence. Especially research focusing on economic, political and social legacies of the pre-WWI empires in their successor states has gained momentum in the past decade, and there is numerous evidence for persistence of differences once a border is removed. What influence, however, will imposition of a border and, respectively, different cultural and...   More >

Atiqul Islam | Higher Education in the Private Sector in South Asia: Trends and Challenges

Lecture | April 4 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Atiqul Islam, Vice Chancellor, North South University, Bangladesh.

 Sanchita Saxena, Director, Subir and Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies; Executive Director, Institute for South Asia Studies

 The Subir & Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

Talk by Prof. Atiqul Islam, Vice Chancellor, North South University, Bangladesh.

DH Faire Keynote: David Bamman: The Long Rise of Word Vectors in the Digital Humanities

Lecture | April 4 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, Academic Innovation Studio, 117 Dwinelle

 David Bamman

 Digital Humanities at Berkeley

In the keynote address to the 2018 DH Faire, Professor David Bamman will outline the history of distributed representations of words and unpack what's new about contemporary (neural) methods of learning such representations compared to previous approaches. http://dh.berkeley.edu/dh-faire-2018

Art against Housework: The Gruppo Immagine and the Wages against Housework Campaign

Lecture | April 4 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 308A Doe Library

 Arts Research Center

Jacopo Galimberti on Art against Housework | The Gruppo Immagine and the Wages against Housework Campaign

2018 Martin Meyerson Faculty Research Lectures

Lecture | April 4 | 4-5 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Victoria Kahn, Professor of Comparative Literature and Katharine Bixby Hotchkis Professor of English

 Department of English, Department of Comparative Literature

Victoria Kahn is Professor of Comparative Literature and Katharine Bixby Hotchkis Professor of English at Berkeley. Her areas of specialization are Renaissance literature and early modern political theory. She received her Ph.D. in comparative literature from Yale University. Before coming to Berkeley, she taught at Bennington College, Johns Hopkins University, UC Irvine, and Princeton University.

Faculty Research Lecture: The Trouble with Literature

Lecture | April 4 | 4-5 p.m. |  Chevron Auditorium, International House

 2299 Piedmont Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94720

 Victoria Kahn, Professor of Comparative Literature and Katharine Bixby Hotchkis Professor of English, UC Berkeley

 Academic Senate

Victoria Kahn is Professor of Comparative Literature and Katharine Bixby Hotchkis Professor of English at Berkeley. Her areas of specialization are Renaissance literature and early modern political theory. She received her Ph.D. in comparative literature from Yale University. Before coming to Berkeley, she taught at Bennington College, Johns Hopkins University, UC Irvine, and Princeton University.

Taming the Sun: A Conversation with Clean Energy Expert Varun Sivaram

Lecture | April 4 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 159 Mulford Hall

 Varun Sivaram, Council on Foreign Relations

 The Berkeley Forum

Solar energy, the cheapest and fastest-growing power source on earth, has nearly unlimited potential. However, energy expert Varun Sivaram warns that the world is not yet equipped to harness erratic sunshine to meet most of its energy needs. Yet, Sivaram believes innovation can brighten these prospects. Financial innovation is already enticing deep-pocketed investors to fund solar projects around...   More >

Free

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Thursday, April 5, 2018

Fire Ecology in California with David Ackerly

Lecture | April 5 | 10-11:30 a.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

The UC Botanical Garden is pleased to host David Ackerly, PI of the Ackerly Lab at UC Berkeley and a leader of the Berkeley Initiative in Global Change Biology for a talk on fire ecology in California and the Bay Area. As our climate changes and we face more extreme fires, what are the impacts on biodiversity and the native flora of California? This talk will look at recent fires and the long...   More >

$20 / $15 UCBG Member / Free for UCB staff, students, and faculty

  Register online

Istanbul: Living with Difference in a Global City

Lecture | April 5 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Nora Fisher-Onar; E. Fuat Keyman

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Panelists will discuss their new volume Istanbul: Living with Difference in a Global City (Rutgers University Press, 2018) which asks: What does Istanbul teach us, for better or for worse, about living with the Other? The interdisciplinary group of contributors hail from politics, international studies, area studies, urban studies, sociology, anthropology, and geography. Chapters examine...   More >

The Imperial Landscape of Assyria, from the Ground and Above

Lecture | April 5 | 5-7 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Jason Ur, Professor, Harvard University

 Archaeological Research Facility, Near Eastern Studies, Badè Museum

This presentation describes project’s methods and preliminary results, with a particular focus on its use of historical remote sensing sources: declassified intelligence aerial photographs (U2) and satellite imagery (CORONA and HEXAGON) and drone-based aerial imagery.

Bastora Dam

Arthur Dudney | Testing the Limits of Comparatism: The Quarrel of the Ancients and Moderns in Persian and Urdu Literary Culture

Lecture | April 5 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Arthur Dudney, Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Cambridge University

 Gregory Maxwell Bruce, Lecturer - Urdu, Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, The Berkeley Urdu Initiative

A talk by Dr Arthur Dudney, scholar of the history of early modern Persian literary education and lexicography in India.

Buddhist and Muslim Perspectives on the Contemporary Crisis in Myanmar

Lecture | April 5 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 John Clifford Holt, Bowdoin College

 Center for Buddhist Studies

Voices from each of the major communities (Arakanese, Burmese and Rohingya) articulate narratives of siege when explaining how the current con icts between Buddhists and Muslims have unfolded recently in Myanmar. Why are respective understandings of belonging and exclusion so seriously contested? How do ethno-religious perspectives and contemporary geo-political realities complicate these...   More >

ERG Annual Lecture: John Harte: The Quest for Simplicity on the Other Side of Complexity

Lecture | April 5 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 John Harte, Professor of the Graduate School

 Energy and Resources Group

John Harte investigates the effects of human actions on, and the linkages among, biogeochemical processes, ecosystem structure and function, biodiversity, and climate.

Astronomy Night at UC Berkeley

Lecture | April 5 | 7:30-10 p.m. | 131 Campbell Hall

 Department of Astronomy

Astronomy Night @ UC Berkeley is back for the 2018 season!

Come join us at Campbell Hall on the UC Berkeley campus on the first Thursday of every month for a FREE public astronomy lecture and stargazing on the roof with our fleet of telescopes. Our full season is available now on our website.

We kick off on April 5th and hope to see you there!

When: Thursday, April 5th
Talk:...   More >

Friday, April 6, 2018

Flying Under the Radar: Privacy, Airport Surveillance, and Transgender Politics

Lecture | April 6 | 12-2 p.m. | 602 Barrows Hall

 Toby Beauchamp, Assistant Professor in Gender and Women's Studies, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

 Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society

Please join us for a HIFIS Transgender Studies faculty job talk:

This talk positions the various medicalized technologies central to airport security screenings in a broader political and cultural context to show how efforts to objectively distinguish between bodies that are worthy of care and bodies that are inherently harmful displace the violence of state policies and practices onto...   More >

Jacobs Design Conversations: Alan Eustace

Lecture | April 6 | 12-1 p.m. | 310 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Alan Eustace, Google’s former Senior Vice President of Knowledge who set skydiving records after planning and completing a jump from the stratosphere, will speak at Jacobs Hall.

The Age of Questions

Lecture | April 6 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Holly Case, Associate Professor of History, Brown University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

The nineteenth century saw the proliferation of questions: the Eastern, social, Jewish, Polish, worker and many other questions were discussed in representative bodies, at treaty negotiations, and in the daily press. Over the course of the next century, questions would be conglomerated into still bigger ones—the European, nationality, social, and agrarian questions—even as they fractured into...   More >

ITS Roundtable: How Do We Finance Transportation Infrastructure

Lecture | April 6 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Tilly Chang, Executive Director San Francisco County Transportation Authority; Matthew A. Coogan, Transportation Consultant; Therese McMillian, Chief Planning Officer Los Angeles Metro

 Susan Shaheen, UC Berkeley, Civil & Environmental Engineering

 Institute of Transportation Studies

ITS Roundtable
How Do We Finance Transportation Infrastructure
Friday April 6, 3:30 - 5:00 pm
Reception to follow
Banatao Auditorium, 310 Sutardja Dai Hall

Tilly Chang: Executive Director San Francisco County Transportation Authority
Matthew A. Coogan: Transportation Consultant
Therese McMillan: Chief Planning Officer Los Angeles Metro
Moderator: Professor Susan Shaheen: UC Berkeley,...   More >

The Old and New Materialisms of Athenian Tragedy

Lecture | April 6 | 5 p.m. | 308A Doe Library | Canceled

 Edith Hall, King's College London

 Department of Classics

Monday, April 9, 2018

Trans Memoir/Memory: Migrations and Territories of Racial Gender Becoming

Lecture | April 9 | 12-2 p.m. | 602 Barrows Hall

 Jian Chen, Assistant Professor of English, The Ohio State University

 Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society

Janet Mock’s coming-of-age stories as a Black and Native Hawaiian trans woman in Redefining Realness (2014) create points of transmission between cis-heterosexual civil society and emergent transgender, especially trans of color, communities in the second decade of the twenty-first century.

Rani D. Mullen | China and India in Afghanistan: A long-term strategic loss for Afghanistan or a win-win for all?

Lecture | April 9 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conference Room)

 Rani D. Mullen, Associate Professor of Government at the College of William and Mary

 Lowell Dittmer, Professor of Political Science, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Department of Political Science, Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Dr. Rani D. Mullen, Associate Professor of Government at the College of William and Mary

Mapping the History of Aesthetic Concepts

Lecture | April 9 | 2-5 p.m. | Doe Library, Visual REsource Center

 Pete de Bolla, Professor of Cultural History and Aesthetics, University of Cambridge, the Faculty of English

 Ewan Jones, University Lecturer in the Nineteenth Century, University of Cambridge, the Faculty of English

 Department of English, Townsend Center for the Humanities

A presentation and discussion of the Concept Lab‘s work on the structure and data of social/intellectual “concepts.”

The Concept Lab studies the architectures of conceptual forms. It is committed to the view that concepts are not equivalent to the meanings of the words which express them. The Lab considers conceptual architectures as generating structured environments for sensing that one has...   More >

Tracking the Concept of Government, 1700-1800: University of Cambridge Concept Lab

Lecture | April 9 | 3-5 p.m. | Doe Library, Doe 308A, Visual Resource Center

 Digital Humanities at Berkeley

In the final event for the 2018 DH Faire, Peter de Bolla and Ewan Jones from the University of Cambridge Concept Lab will showcase a range of techniques that build upon and refine procedures common to corpus linguistics, such as pointwise mutual information. We will also chart a number of specific case studies, using the large dataset of Eighteenth Century Collections Online so as to demonstrate...   More >

Complicity and Dissent: Literature in the Cold War

Lecture | April 9 | 4-6 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Duncan White, Lecturer on History and Literature, Harvard University

 Department of English, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

At the outbreak of the Second World War Vladimir Nabokov stood on the brink of losing everything all over again. The reputation he had built as the pre-eminent Russian novelist in exile was imperilled. In Nabokov and his Books, Duncan White shows how Nabokov went to America and not only reinvented himself as an American writer but also used the success of Lolita to rescue those Russian books that...   More >

Scheiber Lecture: What Lies Ahead for the Ocean

Lecture | April 9 | 4-6 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Room 100

 Ronán Long, World Maritime University

 Law of the Sea Institute

Please join us for the first annual Harry and Jane Scheiber Lecture in Ocean Law and Policy. Professor Ronán Long, Director of the WMU-Sasakawa Global Ocean Institute at the World Maritime University, will provide the inaugural lecture and explore the future of global ocean governance amidst increasing ecological and political challenges.

Towards a Subaltern History of the Crusades?

Lecture | April 9 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Christopher J. Tyerman, Oxford University Professor of the History of the Crusades

 Department of History, Medieval Studies Program, Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Christopher J. Tyerman is Professor of the History of the Crusades at Oxford University. His research considers the cultural, religious, political and social phenomenon of crusading in medieval Western Europe between the eleventh and sixteenth centuries. He has published widely on various aspects of the crusades and on crusade historiography from the Middle Ages to the present day. Recent books...   More >

Imagining The Future Of War

Lecture | April 9 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Sir Lawrence Freedman, Emeritus Professor of War Studies, King's College London

 Institute of International Studies

Professor Sir Lawrence Freedman was Professor of War Studies at King's College London from 1982 to 2014 and Vice-Principal from 2003 to 2013. He was educated at Whitley Bay Grammar School and the Universities of Manchester, York and Oxford. Before joining King's, he held research appointments at Nuffield College Oxford, IISS and the Royal Institute of International Affairs. Elected a Fellow of...   More >

LAEP Lecture: Christophe Girot

Lecture | April 9 | 6-7 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

MON, APRIL, 6:00PM - Christophe Girot is Professor and Chair of Landscape Architecture at the Architecture Department of the ETH (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) in Zürich since 2001.

Smart City of Edinburgh: Routing Enlightenment, 1660-1750

Lecture | April 9 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Murray Pittock, Professor, University of Glasgow, School of Critical Studies

 Florence Green Bixby Chair in English

Using data, evidence and the models provided by modern innovation and urban studies theory, “Smart City of Edinburgh” identifies the particular features of Edinburgh which made the Enlightenment possible. Focused on culture, society, education and cosmopolitan networks rather than people and ideas, it identifies the special qualities of ‘Enlightenment’ as a term rather than the controversial...   More >

Proud to be "Tribeless": Cato Institute President Peter Goettler at the Berkeley Forum

Lecture | April 9 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 125 Morrison Hall

 Peter Goettler, Cato Institute

 The Berkeley Forum

In our lifetimes, we’ve never seen a more divisive period in American politics. According to the Pew Research Center, the partisan gap on political values is now the widest it has been in decades. But is this divide based on actual principles, or merely on differentiating ourselves from the other political “tribe”? Peter Goettler, president of the Cato Institute, will make the case that tribalism...   More >

Free

  Buy tickets online

Proud to be "Tribeless" - Cato Institute President Peter Goettler at the Berkeley Forum

Lecture | April 9 | 6-7 p.m. | 125 Morrison Hall

 Peter Goettler, Cato Institute

 The Berkeley Forum

In our lifetimes, we’ve never seen a more divisive period in American politics. According to the Pew Research Center, the partisan gap on political values is now the widest it has been in decades. But is this divide based on actual principles, or merely on differentiating ourselves from the other political “tribe”? Peter Goettler, president of the Cato Institute, will make the case that tribalism...   More >

  Buy tickets online

new art, flag art, good art, portal art

Lecture | April 9 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Ian Cheng, Artist

 Arts + Design

Ian Cheng’s work explores the nature of mutation and the capacity of humans to relate to change. Drawing on principles of video game design, improvisation, and cognitive science, Cheng has developed “live simulations”, living virtual ecosystems that begin with basic programmed properties, but are left to self-evolve without authorial intent or end. His simulations model the dynamics of often...   More >

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

A Farewell to Arms: Broken Hopes and Total Departure from the Homeland, in The Heroic Battle of Aintab

Lecture | April 10 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Umit Kurt, Polonsky Fellow, The Van Leer Jerusalem Institute

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program

Umit Kurt earned his PhD in history at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Clark University in 2016. He is Polonsky Fellow in the Van Leer Institute in Jerusalem. Dr. Kurt is engaged in his work with examining transfer of Armenian wealth, transformation of space, elite-making process, ordinary perpetrators, collective violence, microhistories, inter-ethnic conflicts, Armenian...   More >

Analyzing European Foreign Policy in a Post-Western World: Operationalizing the Decentring Agenda

Lecture | April 10 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Stephan Keukeleire, University of Leuven, Belgium

 Institute of European Studies

Building on Chakrabarty’s “Provincializing Europe” (2000) and Fisher Onar and Nicolaïdis’ “Decentring Agenda” (2013), Stephan Keukeleire presents an analytical framework to operationalize the decentring agenda and support scholars in analysing European foreign policy in an increasingly non-European and post-Western World. The framework consists of six partially overlapping decentring categories...   More >

Reimagining Morocco's Cultural Heritage for the 21st Century

Lecture | April 10 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Ashley Miller, Visiting Scholar, Center for Middle Eastern Studies

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

In July of 2011, King Mohammed VI of Morocco (r.1999-present) endorsed a constitutional referendum that acknowledged his country’s plural identities and histories in an unprecedented way, describing a Moroccan national identity “forged through the convergence of its Arab-Islamic, Amazigh, and Saharan-Hassanic components, nourished and enriched by its African, Andalusian, Hebraic, and...   More >

Managing Marginalization: Poverty Politics in Post-Unification Germany

Lecture | April 10 | 4-5 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Alexander Graser, University of Regensburg.

 Institute of European Studies

Poverty has become an issue in Germany. Whereas the phenomenon has been present for quite a while, public attention has grown only recently. The talk will review and contextualize poverty-related legislation since the early nineties, highlight trends, identify seeming paradoxies, and discuss potential explanations: Among the candidates are exogenous ones like the fashions of policy diffusion or...   More >

The Persistent Geography of the indio bárbaro: Racial Representation, Racism, and the Mexican Migrant: María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo

Lecture | April 10 | 5:30-8 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Multicultural Community Center

 Center for Race and Gender

The Persistent Geography of the indio bárbaro: Racial Representation, Racism, and the Mexican Migrant

MARÍA JOSEFINA SALDAÑA-PORTILLO
Visiting Professor, English, UC Berkeley
Professor of Social & Cultural Analysis, New York University

Introduction by Prof. Susan Schweik, Department of English

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

SOLD OUT - Practical Garden Design for the Home Gardener

Lecture | April 11 | 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Spend the morning turning your garden dreams into a reality! Join horticulturist for the Garden's Australasian and California collections, Clare Al-Witri, for a perennial garden design workshop. Come with a garden design project in mind and receive advice on steps you can take to create the garden you desire.

$20 / $15 UCBG Member

 SOLD OUT.

Europe. America. Trump.

Lecture | April 11 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 John Peterson, University of Edinburgh

 Institute of European Studies, Institute of Governmental Studies

The election of Donald Trump in 2016 sent shock waves across political classes globally and prompted debates about whether his ‘America first’ agenda threatened the liberal international order generally and the transatlantic alliance specifically. During his first year in office, Trump seemed determined to undermine the hallmarks of the international order: democracy, liberal economics and...   More >

Townsend Center Berkeley Book Chat: Amanda Jo Goldstein: Sweet Science: Romantic Materialism and the New Logics of Life

Lecture | April 11 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Today we do not expect poems to carry scientifically valid information — but this was not always the case. Sweet Science explores how Romantic poetry served as an important tool for scientific inquiry.

Telling Time by the Stars in Mesopotamia: Between Observational and Schematic Astronomy

Lecture | April 11 | 12-1 p.m. | 254 Barrows Hall

 Gil Breger, PhD Candidate (Cuneiform Studies), Department of Near Eastern Studies, UCB

 Near Eastern Studies

Astronomers in Mesopotamia used a group of stars, called ziqpu, in order to indicate and measure time at night. How exactly this was accomplished is unknown. Were they directly observed in the night sky as part of this time-telling practice, or did they belong to some kind of theoretical scheme that allowed astronomers to describe time? The talk will explore the evidence for both these...   More >

The Bureaucratization of Islam in Southeast Asia: Islamic Discourse in the Context of State Power

Lecture | April 11 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Dominik Muller, Head of Research Group, Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

Drawing on debates in the anthropology of the state, Dr. Müller will empirically illustrate and theoretically explain “family resemblances” and differences of bureaucratized Islam in Southeast Asia, mainly drawing upon his own ethnographic work in Brunei and Singapore.

Dominik Muller

Wealth and Poverty of African states

Lecture | April 11 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Morten Jerven, Chair of Africa and International Development, Edinburgh University

 Center for African Studies

Professor Jerven will speak on the topic, Wealth and Poverty of African states - on his forthcoming book on material change (growth, taxes, wages) in African states in the 20th century.

More details to follow.

Morten Jerven

What is "Populism"?: From Zombie Neoliberalism to Racial Nationalism in Global Right Organizing

Lecture | April 11 | 5-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Center for Race and Gender, Department of Gender and Women's Studies

A talk by Lisa Duggan, Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis, New York University

A Sacred Space is Never Empty: A History of Soviet Atheism

Lecture | April 11 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Victoria Smolkin, Assistant Professor of History, Wesleyan University

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion, Department of History

When the Bolsheviks set out to build a new world in the wake of the Russian Revolution, they expected religion to die off. Soviet power used a variety of tools — from education to propaganda to terror — to turn its vision of a Communist world without religion into reality. Yet even with its monopoly on ideology and power, the Soviet Communist Party never succeeded in overcoming religion and...   More >

Feminist Curatorial Practices: A roundtable convening

Lecture | April 11 | 5:30-7 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maude Fife Room, 3rd Floor

 Arts Research Center

Join the Arts Research Center and Apsara DiQuinzio, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art and Phyllis C. Wattis Matrix Curator at BAMPFA for a roundtable conversation about Feminist Curatorial Practices.

ARCH Lecture: Chat Chuenrudeemol

Lecture | April 11 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, APR 11, 6:30pm. The Director of CHAT architects (a CED alumnus) will talk about the relationship between Bangkoks street vernacular and the citys built and theoretical designs, both of which are referred to as Bangkok Bastards. Open to the public!

Thursday, April 12, 2018

State of Emergency and State of Lawlessness: Turkey’s Contemporary Political Predicament

Lecture | April 12 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Hüseyin Levent Köker

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

A substantially significant aspect of constitutionalism is to limit state power even under states of emergencies. Accordingly, “emergency rule” under constitutionalism is not “exceptional”, “extralegal”, therefore “unlimited” form of rule. Turkey, with its relatively long albeit troubled tradition of constitutional government is no exception. Thus, according to the Turkish Constitution (1982),...   More >

Politics at Work: How Employers Use Their Workers to Change US Politics and Policy

Lecture | April 12 | 4-6 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), IRLE Director's Room

 Alexander Hertel-Fernandez, Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University

 Kim Voss, Professor of Sociology, UC Berkeley; Ann Ravel, Lecturer, Berkeley Law

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment, Department of Political Science, UC Berkeley Labor Center

In 2010, the landmark Citizens United Supreme Court decision upheld corporations’ right to participate in politics, declaring that limits to their political spending would infringe on freedom of speech. But money is not the only political resource that corporations can use. Private companies have access to – and control over – powerful human capital in the form of their employees. Professor...   More >

  RSVP online

Vivek Bald | Documenting the Undocumented: Bengali Muslim Migrants In and Beyond 20th Century U.S. Archives

Lecture | April 12 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Vivek Bald, scholar, writer, documentary filmmaker and Associate Professor of Writing and Digital Media at MIT

 Sanchita B. Saxena, Director, Subir and Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies; Executive Director, Institute for South Asia Studies

 The Subir and Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies, Institute of International Studies, Center for British Studies, Asha For Education, Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies, Ethnic Studies Library, Center for Race and Gender

An evening with scholar, writer, documentary filmmaker and Associate Professor of Writing and Digital Media at MIT, Vivek Bald.

Buddhist Painting, Painters and Performance

Lecture | April 12 | 5-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Ronald M. Davidson, Fairfield University

 Center for Buddhist Studies

From the Gupta-Vākāṭaka period forward, Buddhist rituals featured painting on cloth and other media as part of their increasingly elaborate ritual program. The paintings from Ajanta, Bedsa and other sites in India exemplify in some measure the importance of painting systems for Indian Buddhists. In Buddhist usage, both the painter and paintings were sanctified with ritual systems...   More >

DCRP Lecture: KEEANGA-YAMAHTTA TAYLOR

Lecture | April 12 | 5:30-7 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

Dr. Taylor is currently working on a manuscript titled Race for Profit: Black Housing and the Urban Crisis of the 1970s, which looks at the federal governments promotion of single-family homeownership in Black communities after the urban rebellions of th

When Black Lives Matter: Racial Differences in Police Use of Force, and What to do About It: The 23rd Annual Aaron Wildavsky Forum for Public Policy

Lecture | April 12 | 7:30-9 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Room 100

 Roland G. Fryer, Jr., Henry Lee Professor of Economics, Harvard University, Dept. of Economics & Education Innovation Laboratory

 Goldman School of Public Policy

A discussion of policing in modern America, and how racial differences affect use of force and our perception of it; from a policy perspective, how do we go forward? How can we do better for our communities and people of color?

Prof. Roland G. Fryer, Jr.

Friday, April 13, 2018

Overcoming Zero-Sum Games to Sustain Growth and Globalization

Lecture | April 13 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Antonio de Lecea, European Commission

 Institute of European Studies

Some in the West argue that the emerging countries have prospered from globalisation at the expense of low- and middle-income classes in advanced countries by abusing open trade. Others in the East counter that the problem is the unfair distribution in Western countries of the benefits derived from global integration. Antonio de Lecea argues that Europe's stance on globalisation – a combination...   More >

American Empire: A Global History

Lecture | April 13 | 12-2 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 A.G. (Tony) Hopkins, Emeritus Smuts Professor of Commonwealth History, University of Cambridge

 Department of History, African History Working Group

Challenging conventional accounts of the place of the United States in the international order during the last three centuries, this talk will show that the U. S. was part of a Western imperial order throughout this period. After 1898, it ruled a now forgotten empire in the Pacific and Caribbean. It brought formal colonial control to an end after 1945, when other Western powers also abandoned...   More >

Can Canada claim climate leadership? Can the Paris Accord succeed in avoiding the worst of the climate crisis?: Thomas Garden Barnes Lecture

Lecture | April 13 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 109 Moses Hall

 Elizabeth May MP OC, Green Party of Canada

 Canadian Studies Program (CAN)), Institute of Governmental Studies

What role can Canada play to advance global climate goals, especially in 2018 as chair of the G7? As politics and governments change, Canada and the US have changed places, relatively speaking, on climate change. In Canada, global climate saboteur, former Prime Minister Stephen Harper, has been replaced by self-avowed climate champion, current Prime Minister Justin Trudeau; in the US, Barack...   More >

$0

  Registration opens March 26. Register online by April 11.

Understanding, Utilizing, and Predicting Human Mobility Data


Lecture | April 13 | 4 p.m. | 502 Davis Hall

 Jessie Li, Penn State

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: Large scale human mobility data can be collected from mobile phones, car navigation systems, location-based applications, social media, Wi-Fi, and traffic cameras. Turning such raw data into knowledge can provide insights in social science, urban problems, and prevention health, and can also benefit applications in transportation, advertisement targeting, and urban planning. In this...   More >

Working Group in Ancient Philosophy: Aristotle's Concept of Right Action

Lecture | April 13 | 5-7 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Mi-Kyoung Lee, University of Colorado, Boulder

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Monday, April 16, 2018

Sideways Selves: on the decolonizing geographies of trans* justice across the Américas

Lecture | April 16 | 12-2 p.m. | 602 Barrows Hall

 Pedro Javier DiPietro, Assistant Professor in Women's and Gender Studies, Syracuse University

 Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society

Please join us for a HIFIS Transgender Studies faculty job talk:

This talk examines trans* of color geographies as they speak to the hemispheric projects of Latinx, indigenous, and decolonial trans*feminisms. It focuses on trans spaces as responses to the coloniality of gender and its shaping of trans dispossession and rehabilitation.

Network dynamics of fixed and flexible passenger transport under operational and behavioural uncertainty

Lecture | April 16 | 1-2 p.m. | 212 O'Brien Hall

 Oded Cats, Delft University of Technology

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract:
The metropolitan passenger transport landscape is shifting due to a combination of technological and social developments which enable both service providers and service users to become increasingly adaptive. Service providers can manage their resources to better cater for prevailing demand patterns, while service users can adjust their behaviour in response to real-time information. In...   More >

Aleshire Lecture: Writing the Laws of Late Classical and Hellenistic Crete (Paula Perlman)

Lecture | April 16 | 4-6:30 p.m. | 308A Doe Library

 Paula Perlman, Professor of Classics, University of Texas (Austin)

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in , Aleshire Center for the Study of Greek Epigraphy

2017/2018 Aleshire Lecture

Non-Authoritarian Authority: A Critical Theory of Politics for Our Times

Lecture | April 16 | 5-7 p.m. | 3401 Dwinelle Hall

 Maeve Cooke, Professor of Philosophy, University College Dublin

 The Program in Critical Theory

What makes a political theory a critical theory of politics? What critical theory of politics responds best to the particular challenges of our times? Drawing on a conception of critical theory indebted to the Frankfurt School tradition of theorizing, but integrating new impulses from outside it, I identify the salient features of a critical theory of politics. Using this general account as a...   More >

The Aesir and the Anthropocene: Ecology and Catastrophe in Norse Mythology: A talk by Professor Chris Abram

Lecture | April 16 | 5-7 p.m. | UC Berkeley Campus, Geballe Room at the Townsend Center

 Chris Abram

 Medieval Studies Program

“The Aesir and the Anthropocene: Ecology and Catastrophe in Norse Mythology.”

Chris Abram, Associate Professor of English, University of Notre Dame

Monday, April 16, 2018 at 5:00 pm in the Geballe Room of the Townsend Center.

False Comfort: Sex, Prayer and Modernism in Eimear McBride's 'A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing'

Lecture | April 16 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Institute of European Studies

Join the Irish Studies Program for a lecture by Professor Paige Reynolds (College of the Holy Cross) on acclaimed Irish novelist Eimear McBride.


Paige Reynolds, Professor of English at College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA, has published widely on the subjects of modernism, drama and performance, and modern and contemporary Irish literature. She is the author of Modernism, Drama, and the...   More >

Challenges for Democracy in Brazil

Lecture | April 16 | 6 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Dilma Rousseff

 Center for Latin American Studies

Dilma Rousseff (President of Brazil 2011-16) on the challenges for democracy in Brazil.

Tickets are not currently available. At the event there will be a stand-by line. Any open seats will be released shortly before the start of the event. Please arrive early.

Angela Davis: Abolition Feminisms

Lecture | April 16 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Angela Davis, Distinguished Professor Emerita of History of Consciousness, University of California, Santa Cruz

 Arts + Design

Through her activism and scholarship over many decades, Angela Davis has been deeply involved in movements for social justice around the world. Her work as an educator – both at the university level and in the larger public sphere – has always emphasized the importance of building communities of struggle for economic, racial, and gender justice.

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett on Theatre of History: Presenting the Past in American Jewish Museums

Lecture | April 16 | 6:30-9 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

What is “the problem with Jewish museums”? Whereas there were only two major Jewish museums in the United States before the Second World War, there has been a proliferation of Jewish museums and Holocaust museums since. What stories do they tell? Who are they for? And, is there something about the American Jewish experience that distinguishes Jewish museums from those devoted to the history of...   More >

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Why are Labour’s Progressives Ineffective?

Lecture | April 17 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Matt Beech, University of Hull, England

 Institute of European Studies

The public lecture will examine the travails of the progressive wing of the British Labour Party. These right-wing Labour MPs, peers and activists were once in the ascendant of UK politics and it is arguable that they were the dominant force for over a decade (1997-2010). ‘New Labour’, ‘Blairites’, ‘Brownites’, ‘moderates’ are labels applied to this wing of the Labour Party. The designation...   More >

Czechoslovak Exile After 1948: Activities, Problems, and International Cooperation

Lecture | April 17 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Martin Nekola, Research Director, Democracy 21

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

The exile after the coup in 1948 and the fate of Czechs abroad, who sought the return of freedom and democracy to their homeland, enslaved by the Communists, are an integral part of our modern history. However, this phenomenon is still neglected and the general public has only fragmentary information about it. Researchers are still unable to agree on the intensities of individual waves of...   More >

Foerster Lectures on the Immortality of the Soul featuring Marilyn Strathern: Souls in Other Selves, and the Immortality of the Body

Lecture | April 17 | 4:10 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Marilyn Strathern, Former William Wyse Professor of Social Anthropology, University of Cambridge

 Graduate Division

Marilyn Strathern will present the Foerster lecture on Tuesday, April 17, 2018 titled "Souls in Other Selves, and the Immortality of the Body." The lecture is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Marilyn Strathern

Milan Vaishnav | When Crime Pays: Money and Muscle in Indian Politics

Lecture | April 17 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Milan Vaishnav, Senior Fellow, South Asia Program, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

 Gareth Nellis, The Evidence in Governance and Politics (EGAP) Post-doctoral Fellow, University of California, Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Institute of International Studies, Clausen Center for International Business and Policy

A talk by political economist, Dr. Milan Vaishnav on his new book, "When Crime Pays: Money and Muscle in Indian Politics."

A White Stone for Belfast: One Take on Religious Politics

Lecture | April 17 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Robert Orsi, Professor of Religious Studies and History and Grace Craddock Nagle Chair in Catholic Studies, Northwestern University

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

This lecture asks what “religious” politics might be given the deconstruction of the concept of “religion” that has taken place over the past several decades, which has uncovered its implicit social, legal, and political agendas from early modernity forward. It takes as its starting point an experience Anglican sisters had in Belfast at the height of the troubles, when they attempted to carve out...   More >

Post-Nazi Germany and the Myth of American Influence

Lecture | April 17 | 5-7 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Noah B. Strote, North Carolina State University

 Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies, GHI West - Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC

Drawing on the author's recent book, Lions and Lambs: Conflict in Weimar and the Creation of Post-Nazi Germany (2017), this talk will challenge older explanations of postwar German liberal democratic reconstruction and offer a new interpretation rooted in under-explored sources from the Hitler era.

Noah B. Strote is an Associate Professor of European History at North Carolina State University....   More >

Why the Status of Women Matters for National Progress: Rachel Vogelstein at the Berkeley Forum

Lecture | April 17 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 125 Morrison Hall

 Rachel Vogelstein, Council on Foreign Relations

 The Berkeley Forum

With the resurgence of women's rights movement, thanks to the #MeToo campaign and the Women's March on Washington, the status of women has risen to the top of the national and global dialogue. Rachel Vogelstein has spent her career working to elevate the status of women both at home and abroad, as an official at the State Department, the White House Council for Women and Girls, and as a senior...   More >

Free

  Buy tickets online

The Gayley Lecture: Unfixed: How the Women of Glenwood Changed American IQ, and Why We Don't Know It

Lecture | April 17 | 8-9:30 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maude Fife Room, 315 Wheeler Hall

 Susan Schweik, Professor, Berkeley English

 Department of English

The talk is free and open to the public. The venue is wheelchair accessible. CART transcription and ASL interpretation can be provided with advance request to Susan Schweik (sschweik@berkeley.edu). Please refrain from wearing scented products.

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

A Question of Design: Gender in Hawaiian Kauhale

Lecture | April 18 | 12-1 p.m. |  2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Kirsten Vacca

 Archaeological Research Facility

This talk reviews the results of a research project conducted in Nu‘u, Kaupō, Maui. The focus of this project was an examination of the kauhale (house complex) construction phenomena researchers in Hawaiian archaeology postulate reflect a gender-segregated use of space and gender-segregated activities. Previous work in Hawaiian archaeology has relied on late 19th and early 20th century...   More >

A Talk with Porpentine Charity Heartscape

Lecture | April 18 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Porpentine Charity Heartscape, Writer and Game Designer

 Arts + Design

Porpentine Charity Heartscape is an Oakland based new media artist, video game designer, writer and curator primarily a developer of hypertext games and interactive fiction mainly built using Twine. She will be in conversation with artist Elisa Giardina Papa.

Porpentine Charity Heartscape is a writer, game designer, and dead swamp milf in Oakland. Her work includes xenofemme scifi/fantasy,...   More >

Townsend Center Berkeley Book Chat: Tom McEnaney: Acoustic Properties: Radio, Narrative, and the New Neighborhood of the Americas

Lecture | April 18 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

In his study of the coevolution of radio and the novel in Argentina, Cuba, and the United States, McEnaney explores how novelists in the radio age transformed realism as they struggled to channel and shape popular power.

Dada and Futurism in Finland

Lecture | April 18 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Nikolai Sadik-Ogli

 Institute of European Studies, Nordic Studies Program

By the time that Finland achieved independence in 1917, the European art world had been shaken by a number of radically avant-garde movements. Among the most extreme of these were Futurism, which was founded in 1909 by Italian artists but also fostered many aesthetic connections with similar movements in Russia, and Dada, which was started in 1916 and adopted many of the multimedia and...   More >

Muslim Spaces, Jewish Pasts: Genealogies of the Split Arab / Jew Figure

Lecture | April 18 | 12-2 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Ella Shohat, Professor, Art & Public Policy and Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies, New York University

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Center for Race and Gender

This lecture will offer a genealogical reading of the gradual splitting of the formerly unified Orientalist Semitic figure into a separate “Arab” and “Jew” and the ramifications of this split for contemporary discourses about Jews and Muslims.

Pictures of a Gone City: Tech and the Dark Side of Prosperity in the Bay Area

Lecture | April 18 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison St, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

The San Francisco Bay Area is currently the jewel in the crown of capitalism—the tech capital of the world and one of the wealthiest cities in the world. But there is a dark side of success...   More >

Milan Vaishnav | Cost of Democracy: Political Finance in India

Lecture | April 18 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Milan Vaishnav, Director and Senior Fellow, South Asia Program, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

 Institute of International Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

One of the most troubling critiques of contemporary democracy is the inability of representative governments to regulate the deluge of money in politics. If it is impossible to conceive of democracies without elections, it is equally impractical to imagine elections without money. Political scientist Milan Vaishnav will preview the findings of a new edited volume, Costs of Democracy—an...   More >

2018 Lawson Lecture: The HayWired earthquake scenario

Lecture | April 18 | 4:30-6:30 p.m. | Memorial Stadium, University Club

 Ken Hudnut, Science Advisor for Risk Reduction, United State Geological Survey; Brad Aagaard, Research Geophysicist, United States Geological Survey; Anne Wein, Principle Investigator, United States Geological Survey; Keith Porter, Research Professor, University of Colorado at Boulder; Laurie Johnson, Principal and Founder, Laurie Johnson Consulting; Jennifer Strauss, Regional Coordinator for ShakeAlert, University of California at Berkeley; Naomi Kelly, City Administrator, City of San Francisco

 Berkeley Seismology Lab

This year the lecture will feature a welcome reception followed by a panel discussion. Join us to learn about the likely impacts from a large earthquake in the east bay and ask the HayWired team your questions.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Bancroft Library Roundtable: From Kitchen Tables to Laboratories: Nutritional Science at UC Berkeley, 1895-1930

Lecture | April 19 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Kimberly Killion, doctoral candidate, History, and Bancroft Library Study Award recipient, UC Berkeley

 Bancroft Library

During the late nineteenth century, scientists from various fields began conducting experiments that would change the way most Americans defined, chose, and related to food. Drawing from the collections of early professors of nutrition Myer Jaffa and Agnes Fay Morgan, Killion will discuss the development of nutritional science at UC Berkeley during a transformative period in American food history.

William Mazzarella | Mad Man of Bombay: A Tale of Magic Found and Lost

Lecture | April 19 | 3-5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room) | Note change in time

 Dr. William Mazzarella, The Neukom Family Professor and Chair of the Department of Anthropology at the University of Chicago

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by Dr. William Mazzarella, the Neukom Family Professor and Chair of the Department of Anthropology at the University of Chicago.

Reflections on the End of the Safety Net as We Know It

Lecture | April 19 | 4-6 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Sheldon Danziger, President, Russell Sage Foundation

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment, Goldman School of Public Policy, Institute for Governmental Studies, Berkeley Opportunity Lab, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, California Policy Lab

It’s been over fifty years since President Johnson declared war on poverty, and each year, our federal and state governments spend billions of dollars trying to alleviate it. So why are some 45.3 million Americans still living below the poverty line? Why is there still no consensus on what can be done to reduce poverty? And why does “poverty won the war” (Ronald Reagan, 1986) remain a political...   More >

  RSVP online

The Question of Judeo-Arabic: Nation, Partition, and the Linguistic Imaginary: CMES Distinguished Visitor Lecture

Lecture | April 19 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Ella Shohat, New York University

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Professor Ella Shohat, 2018 CMES Distinguished Visitor, teaches at the departments of Art & Public Policy and Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies at New York University. She has lectured and written extensively on issues having to do with post/colonial and transnational approaches to Cultural studies. Her writing has been translated into diverse languages, including: French, Hebrew, Arabic,...   More >

Facts and Other Metaphors of Enlightenment Science

Lecture | April 19 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, T. B. A.

 Tita Chico, Associate Professor, University of Maryland English

 The Eighteenth-Century and Romanticism Colloquium

A Conversation With Mr. Omar Abdullah: The Path Forward in Kashmir

Lecture | April 19 | 5-6:30 p.m. | Faculty Club, Great Hall

 Omar Abdullah, Indian Politician

 Institute of International Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

Charismatic, articulate, and an ardent fan of technology, Omar Abdullah is an Indian politician and the scion of one of the most prominent political families of Jammu and Kashmir, the Abdullah family. He served as the youngest Chief Minister of the State of Jammu and Kashmir from 2009-2014. He is currently the Leader of opposition in J&K legislative assembly.

As a former Chief Minister and one...   More >

DCRP / Davis Lecture: Confronting Youth and Family Homelessness

Lecture | April 19 | 5:30-7 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

Join us for the lecture/panel on homelessness on 4/19/2018 in 112 Wurster Auditorium.

Memento Mori: Lessons from a Decade Among the Dead

Lecture | April 19 | 6-8 p.m. | Latimer Hall, 120 Latimer Hall | Note change in location

 Dr. Paul Koudounaris

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

For over a decade, Dr. Paul Koudounaris has traveled the world documenting the display of human remains in religious practice. From the earliest Christian charnel houses to mummy festivals in modern day Indonesia, he found that the taboo we commonly associate with the dead body was anything but universal. In many cultures throughout history and many presently, a literal memento mori--a reminder...   More >

Leslie Scalapino Memorial Lecture in Innovative Poetics

Lecture | April 19 | 7-8:30 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife

 Emilie Clark

 Department of English

Please join us on April 19th at 7 pm for the 2017-18 Leslie Scalapino Lecture in Innovative Poetics. This year’s lecture will be given by New York-based visual artist Emilie Clark. Her talk,
"Toward an Ethnography of Earth’s Household" will be held in 315 Wheeler Hall and followed by a reception in the English Department Lounge (Wheeler 300). This event is free and open to the public.

Emilie...   More >