<< March 2018 >>

Thursday, March 1, 2018

Robert Louis Stevenson in Samoa

Lecture | March 1 | 4-6:30 p.m. | 306 Wheeler Hall

 Joseph Farrell

 Department of English, C. 19 & Beyond British Cultural Studies Working Group

The C.19 & Beyond British Cultural Studies Working Group is pleased to invite you all to hear our guest speaker Joe Farrell present work from his forthcoming book, "Robert Louis Stevenson in Samoa," which analyzes the author's final years in Samoa and his relationship to British Colonialism.

What You Lose When You Lose Your Job: The Lasting Impacts of Unemployment

Lecture | March 1 | 4-6 p.m. |  2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment)

 Jennie Brand, Professor of Sociology, UCLA

 Danny Yagan, Professor of Economics, UC Berkeley

 Sandra Smith, Director, Institute for Research on Labor and Employment

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment, Center for the Study of Law and Society, Department of Economics, Berkeley Population Center

As the US economy improves, the unemployment rate continues to fall. But job loss has far-reaching and long-lasting consequences, and many Americans are still dealing with the economic, social, and psychological effects of layoffs. Professor Brand will explore the complex ways that the shock of job loss impacts workers’ career achievement, economic outcomes, and wellbeing, and how these effects...   More >

  RSVP online

Mosse-Lecture: Can Architecture Be Democratic?: 2nd Annual Mosse-Lecture

Lecture | March 1 | 4:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Jan-Werner Mueller, Professor, Political Science, Princeton University

 Martin Jay, Professor, History, UC Berkeley

 Department of German, The Mosse Foundation

Many people have an intuitive sense that the built environment is bound up with politics. The lecture poses the question how we might think more systematically (and normatively) about the relationship between democracy and architecture as well as public spaces as a particular form of the built environment.

Leaving Religion and Losing Culture: Secular Conversion among Hispanic Freethinkers, Black Atheists, and Ex-Muslims: Joseph Blankholm

Lecture | March 1 | 5 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities, Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Relying on years of ethnographic research among avowedly secular people, Blankholm argues that becoming secular is a transformative process akin to conversion, and that secular Americans who are not white or who convert from non-Christian religions face unique challenges that lead to new forms of secularism.

HTNM: "The Software Arts" with Warren Sacks

Lecture | March 1 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 470 Stephens Hall

 Warren Sacks, UCSC

 Center for New Media

Sacks argues computing grew out of the arts. This argument will be a provocation for some, especially for those who see a bright line dividing the “two cultures” of the arts and the sciences. For others, the argument will not seem provocative at all.

Ferdinand de Saussure and the Phonic Harmony of Archaic Latin Poetry: Sather Lecture #4

Lecture | March 1 | 5:30 p.m. |  Alumni House | Note change in time and location

 Maurizio Bettini, Università degli Studi di Siena

 Department of Classics

SOLD OUT - The Science of Cannabis: Cannabis as Medicine

Lecture | March 1 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

What are the potential therapeutic benefits of Cannabis to ameliorate physical and psychological illnesses? Because of the constraints on conducting medical research on Cannabis and related products, much available information is empirical and has not been subjected to the rigors of the scientific method.

$30 / $25 UCBG Members / $15 Current students

 SOLD OUT.

Pioneering Tech Journalist and Author Kara Swisher

Lecture | March 1 | 6:15-7:45 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 Graduate School of Journalism, Taube Philanthropies

Seating is first come, first served. Advance registration does not guarantee seating.

About Kara Swisher
Kara Swisher is one of the country's most influential journalists covering Silicon Valley, the focus of her reporting for over two decades. She is the executive editor of Recode, host of the Recode Decode podcast and co-executive producer of the high-profile Code Conference. Swisher...   More >

  RSVP online by February 26.

Friday, March 2, 2018

Espalier and Pollarding Techniques

Lecture | March 2 | 10-11:30 a.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

Join UCBG's landscape horticulturist, Mathew McMillan for a talk on the history, advantages, and techniques to espalier and pollard trees.

$20 / $15 UCBG Member

  Register online

Beyond Insiders and Outsiders: Rethinking Nationalism and the Politics of “Othering” in the Modern Balkans

Lecture | March 2 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Edin Hajdarpasic, Associate Professor of History, Loyola University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

During the nineteenth century, Serbian and Croatian national movements defined themselves against the specter of “the Turk.” Yet even as they explicitly named “the Turks” as sworn enemies, many Serbian-Croatian nationalists simultaneously described Bosnian Turks or Muslims as their “brothers,” pointing to their shared language, traditions, and ancestry. As one leading South Slavic nationalist...   More >

The Killing Season: A History of the Indonesian Massacres, 1965-66

Lecture | March 2 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Geoffrey Robinson, Professor of History, UCLA

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

Prof. Robinson will discuss his new book, which examines the shocking anti-leftist purge that gripped Indonesia in 1965–66, leaving some 500,000 people dead and more than one million others in detention. The book will be available for sale at the end of the lecture.

Geoff Robinson

Jacobs Design Conversations: Allison Arieff

Lecture | March 2 | 12-1 p.m. | 310 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Allison Arieff, editorial director of SPUR and contributing opinion writer for the New York Times, will speak on “Solving All the Wrong Problems” as part of the Jacobs Design Conversations series.

Managing Transportation in a New Era of Innovation

Lecture | March 2 | 4 p.m. | 502 Davis Hall

 Jeff Morales, ITS Senior Fellow

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: A combination of forces is affecting the development and delivery of infrastructure and transportation services and presenting the industry with new challenges. Forces such as politics, budgetary constraints, organizational and workforce issues, and technology continue to change and require innovative approaches and solutions. With a new and different level of engagement by the private...   More >

Monday, March 5, 2018

LAEP LECTURE: Joan Iverson Nassauer

Lecture | March 5 | 5:30-7 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

MON, MARCH 5, 6:00PM - Wurster Auditorium

The Perennial Mindset in the Era of Ageless

Lecture | March 5 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Gina Pell, Content Chief, The What; Susan Hoffman, Director, Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, UC Berkeley

 Arts + Design

While the world argues about who, or which generation, is relevant ... Gina Pell, tech entrepreneur and Berkeley alum, offers has coined the term Perennials to describe an ever-blooming group of people of ALL ages, stripes, and types who transcend stereotypes and make connections with each other and the world around them. Perennials don't let age define their interests, tastes, social behavior,...   More >

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

Storm Clouds Over The Western Pacific: Challenges To American Strategy In East Asia

Lecture | March 6 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall | Canceled

 Admiral Dennis C. Blair, Former Director of National Intelligence

 Institute of International Studies

Admiral Dennis Blair currently serves as a director and advisor to National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR), Sasakawa Peace Foundation, the Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property, the Energy Security Leadership Council of Securing America’s Future Energy, and Freedom House. Admiral Blair has also served on the Institute for Defense Analyses, a federally funded research and...   More >

Air Around Us: Science, Technology, and Health: CEE Spring Distinguished Lecture

Lecture | March 6 | 5-6 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 William Nazaroff, Daniel Tellep Distinguished Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering Dept., UC Berkeley

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

This lecture features three vignettes that illustrate recent advances in knowledge about the air we breathe. The advanced analytical capability combined with deep domain knowledge is yielding surprising new insights about the composition of the air around us.

Library Lecture: Joseph Slusky

Lecture | March 6 | 7-8:30 p.m. | 210 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

Joseph Slusky, an artist, sculptor and faculty member in the College of Environmental Design for more than thirty years will discuss his sculpture and two-dimensional work spanning a period of over fifty years.

Joseph Slusky - Steel Dreams: Dialogs in Two and Three Dimensions

Lecture | March 6 | 7-8:30 p.m. | Wurster Hall, 210 - Environmental Design Library Atrium

 Joseph Slusky

 Library

Joseph Slusky, an artist, sculptor and faculty member in the College of Environmental Design for over thirty years will discuss his sculpture and two-dimensional work spanning a period of over fifty years. Five of his sculptures are on permanent display in the Environmental Design Library. Professor Slusky will trace the historic roots of his work and the journey of subconscious exploration.

Joseph Slusky

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Townsend Center Berkeley Book Chat: Robert Hass: A Little Book on Form: An Exploration into the Formal Imagination of Poetry

Lecture | March 7 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Professor of English and former US poet laureate Robert Hass reveals the role of instinct and imagination within poetic form, demonstrating his formidable gifts as both a poet and a critic.

Pre-Industrial Iron-Working in Central India: a New Perspective

Lecture | March 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Tathagata Neogi, Ph.D., Founder, Heritage Walk Calcutta

 Archaeological Research Facility, Institute for South Asia Studies

The research revealed a complex set of decisions involved in the organization and spread of metal production in the landscape that provided an explanation for the location of archaeological sites.

The Afterlife of Gender: Transgender Deaths and Familial, Religious and Political Belonging in Contemporary Turkey

Lecture | March 7 | 12-2 p.m. | 602 Barrows Hall

 Asli Zengin, Research Associate and Visiting Professor in the Women’s Studies in Religion Program, Harvard Divinity School

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Center for Race and Gender

Associations between death, sovereignty, and gendered belonging have received little scholarly attention in social sciences and humanities. Professor Zengin's talk explores this intricate and intimate relationship by focusing on Sunni Muslim transgender people’s deaths, their funeral ceremonies and burial and mourning practices in Turkey.

Self-Disclosure and Response Behaviors in Socially Stigmatized Contexts on Social Media

Lecture | March 7 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Nazanin Andalibi

 Information, School of

How can social media platforms better foster well-being when people experience distress and stigma?

Catharsis as Free Rein

Lecture | March 7 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Pierre Destrée, University of Louvain, Institute of Philosophy

 Department of Classics, Department of Philosophy

Chester W. Nimitz Memorial Lecture: Storm Clouds Over the Western Pacific: Challenges to American Strategy in East Asia

Lecture | March 7 | 7-9 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Admiral Dennis C. Blair, Former U.S. Director of National Intelligence

 Military Sciences Program (ROTC)

This year, NROTC UC Berkeley is proud to present Admiral Dennis C. Blair at the annual Nimitz Lecture Series. Admiral Blair currently serves as a director and advisors to National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR), Sasakawa Peace Foundation, the Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property, the Energy Security Leadership Council of Securing America’s Future Energy, and Freedom House....   More >

ARCH Lecture: Johnston Marklee

Lecture | March 7 | 7:30-9 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, MAR 7, 7:30pm. Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee, founding partners of an award-winning architecture firm and Artistic Directors for the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial, will talk about their work. Co-sponsored by AIA East Bay. Open to the public!

Thursday, March 8, 2018

Seeing the FSA: Photogrammar Remixes the Documentary Photography of the Great Depression

Lecture | March 8 | 4:30-5:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Laura Wexler, Yale University, American Studies Program

 American Studies, Department of History of Art, Department of English, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Phi Beta Kappa Berkeley Chapter

The Photogrammar Project is a web-based platform for organizing, searching and visualizing the 170,000 photographs from 1935 to 1945 created by the United States Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI). Its development, supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Council of Learned Societies, is a vivid example of contemporary image-based...   More >

Seeing the FSA: Photogrammar Remixes the Documentary Photography of the Great Depression

Lecture | March 8 | 4:30-6 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Laura Wexler, Professor, Yale University

 Department of English, American Studies, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Berkeley Art History Department, Phi Beta Kappa Berkeley Chapter, The National Phi Beta Kappa Society

The Photogrammar Project is a web-based platform for organizing, searching and visualizing the 170,000 photographs from 1935 to 1945 created by the United States Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI). Its development, supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Council of Learned Societies, is a vivid example of contemporary image-based ...   More >

Owners of the Map: Motorcycle Taxi Drivers, Mobility, and Politics in Bangkok

Lecture | March 8 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 106 Wurster Hall

 Claudio Sopranzetti, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, All Souls College, University of Oxford

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Institute of Transportation Studies, Center of Global Metropolitan Studies

Based on research conducted during politically charged protests in Bangkok in 2010, this talk presents an ethnographic study of motorcycle taxi drivers in the city that focuses not on the sturdiness of hegemony or the ubiquity of everyday resistance but on its potential fragility and the work needed for its maintenance.

Claudio Sopranzetti

Migrants, Monks, and Monasteries: Toward a History of South China Sea Buddhism

Lecture | March 8 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Jack Meng-Tat Chia, UC Berkeley/National University of Singapore

 Tang Center for Silk Road Studies

Chinese migration since the nineteenth century have led to the spread of Buddhism to maritime Southeast Asia. Recently, scholars of Buddhism and historians of Chinese religions have begun to consider the connected history of Buddhism in China and Southeast Asia, using Buddhist records, epigraphic sources, as well as oral history interviews. In this talk, Jack Chia explores the transregional...   More >

Teena Purohit | The “Protestant” Impulse in Modern Islamic Thought

Lecture | March 8 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Teena Purohit, Associate Professor of Religion at Boston University

 Abhishek Kaicker, Assistant Professor, Department of History, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies

A talk by Teena Purohit, Associate Professor of Religion at Boston University

Friday, March 9, 2018

Frederick Douglass: On Photography

Lecture | March 9 | 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. | 308A Doe Library

 Laura Wexler, Professor, Yale University

 Department of English, American Studies, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Berkeley Art History Department, Phi Beta Kappa Berkeley Chapter, The National Phi Beta Kappa Society

In the 1860s, Frederick Douglass gave several public lectures about the importance of the thennew
invention of photography. In “Pictures and Progress” he shared his vision of the role he hoped
photography would play in fostering a more democratic society after the Civil War. Douglass thus
became one of the first major American theorists of the medium. This presentation and discussion...   More >

Diverting Water, Diverting the Nation: Water Infrastructure Controversies and the Oyu Tolgoi Copper-Gold Mine in South Gobi Province, Mongolia

Lecture | March 9 | 12 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Franck Bille, Program Director, Tang Center for Silk Road Studies

 Sara L. Jackson, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Metropolitan State University of Denver

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative

The Oyu Tolgoi copper-gold mine has become a symbol of the promise of mining to revive Mongolia’s struggling economy and to propel the nation into a new era of prosperity. Water resources are vital to the operation of Oyu Tolgoi, which is expected to be in operation for at least thirty years. However, local residents, particularly nomadic herders, have raised concerns about the redirection of...   More >

A Drive for Better Air Service: How air service imbalances across megaregions integrate air and highway demands

Lecture | March 9 | 4 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Megan Smirti Ryerson, University of Pennsylvania

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: Between 2000 and 2010, newly merged U.S. airlines decreased service to airports in small and mid-sized metropolitan regions, opting to consolidate their operations at high-value airport hubs (passenger transfer points). At this point travelers living in small and mid-sized regions likely began leaking, or abandoning their local airport to take flights from hub airports offering more...   More >

Monday, March 12, 2018

Gabrielle Kruks-Wisner | Claiming the State: Active Citizenship and Social Welfare in Rural India

Lecture | March 12 | 3-5 p.m. | 119 Moses Hall

 Gabrielle Kruks-Wisner, University of Virginia

 Institute of International Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

Gabrielle Kruks-Wisner will discuss her book, Active Citizenship: Claim-Making and the Pursuit of Social Welfare in Rural India. This book explores the everyday practices through which poor citizens of the world’s largest democracy make claims on the state for social welfare. Drawing on an original survey of 2210 households as well as 500 in-depth interviews in 105 villages of Rajasthan, she...   More >

Are Atheists Tolerable? American Nonbelievers and Irreligious Freedom

Lecture | March 12 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Leigh Eric Schmidt, Edward C. Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor in the Humanities, Washington University in St. Louis

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Leigh Eric Schmidt is the Edward C. Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor in the Humanities at Washington University in St. Louis. He joined Washington’s John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics in 2011.

A talk by Marc Redfield: Shibboleth: From Judges to Celan and Derrida

Lecture | March 12 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Marc Redfield, Professor, Brown University

 Department of English, 18th Century and Romanticism Colloquium

Defining the Medieval Mediterranean Economy: Sources and Questions: A talk by Chris Wickham, March 12th 2018

Lecture | March 12 | 5 p.m. |  Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union

 Chris Wickham, Oxford University

 Medieval Studies Program

"Defining the Medieval Mediterranean Economy: Sources and Questions."

Chris Wickham, Chichele Professor of Medieval History emeritus at Oxford University and Fellow of All Souls College

12 March 2018
5:00 pm in Pauley Ballroom East, MLK Center.

Judith Butler and Zeynep Gambetti in conversation on Public Happiness

Lecture | March 12 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor, Comparative Literature, UC Berkeley; Zeynep Gambetti, Political Theory, Boğazici University

 Arts + Design

Join UC Berkeley Professor Judith Butler as she talks with Turkish political philosopher Zeynep Gambetti on the idea of public happiness in the wake of public resistance, using the 2013 Gezi Park protests in Istanbul as a springboard.

Judith Butler is a Maxine Elliot Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley. Her work has been influential...   More >

Annette Yoshiko Reed: Forgetting: the Jewish Past between Rupture and Renewal

Lecture | March 12 | 7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Annette Yoshiko Reed, Professor, New York University

 Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Chair in Jewish Studies, GTU Center for Jewish Studies, Lehrhaus Judaica, Jewish Studies Program at UC Davis, Taube Center for Jewish Studies at Stanford University

2018 Taubman Lecture Series

Lecture 1: Monday, March 12, 7 pm: What Was Lost with the Dead Sea Scrolls

  RSVP online

Planet Vision: Why we first need to build a shared, positive vision of the future to address our environmental challenges

Lecture | March 12 | 7-8:30 p.m. |  Anna Head Alumnae Hall (2537 Haste St.)

 Dr. Jonathan Foley, California Academy of Sciences

 College of Natural Resources

A world-renowned scientist, Dr. Foley's work focuses on the sustainability of our planet and the ecosystems and natural resources we depend on. Throughout his career, he has made major contributions to our understanding of worldwide changes in ecosystems, land use and climate, and global food security.

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

The Princess and the Prayer Scroll.: A talk by Leslie Brubaker

Lecture | March 13 | 308A Doe Library

 Leslie Brubaker, University of Birmingham

 Medieval Studies Program

"The Princess and the Prayer Scroll."

Leslie Brubaker, Professor of Byzantine Art emerita & Director of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies at the University of Birmingham.

13 March 2018
5:00 pm in Doe Library 308A

Tripodi Lecture with Dr. Ange-Marie Hancock Alfaro: Understanding Asylum Intersectionally: The Case for Domestic Violence as a Transnational Health Issue

Lecture | March 13 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Haviland Hall, Haviland Commons

 Social Welfare, School of

Comparatively few intersectional studies attempt to incorporate the principles of intersectionality into their research design and data analysis protocols. This project tests a specific design and data analysis strategy to consider domestic violence’s transnational impact on asylum requests in the United States.

Ange-Marie Hancock Alfaro, PhD
Professor and Chair, Gender Studies
Professor,...   More >

Regulating the Human Supply Chain

Lecture | March 13 | 4-6 p.m. | 2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment), IRLE Director's Room

 Jennifer Gordon, Professor of Law, Fordham University

 Irene Bloemraad, Professor of Sociology, UC Berkeley; Chris Zepeda-Millan, Professor of Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Research on Labor & Employment, Department of Ethnic Studies, Berkeley Interdisciplinary Migration Initiative

It’s no secret that recruiting guest workers can be a shady business. Often, the fraud and extortion that guest workers face are blamed on a few bad apple recruiters, who are targeted by criminal regulation that almost never works. But the problems are bigger than bad apples. Structural forces encourage abuse, from the subcontracting common in guest worker recruitment schemes to cost pressures...   More >

  RSVP online

Shobna Nijhawan | Gender, Genre and Visuality in the Creation of a Literary 'Canon': Hindi Publishing in Colonial Lucknow

Lecture | March 13 | 5-7:30 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Shobna Nijhawan, Associate Professor of Hindi at the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, York University, Toronto

 Vasudha Paramasivan, Assistant Professor of Hindi Literature, Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies

A talk by Dr. Shobna Nijhawan, Associate Professor of Hindi at the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, York University, Toronto.

Transboundary Natures: The Consequences of the Iron Curtain for Landscape

Lecture | March 13 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Astrid M. Eckert, Emory University

 Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies, GHI West. The Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC

This talk investigates the ecological footprint of the Iron Curtain and the consequences of the border regime for landscape and wildlife. It moves beyond the quotidian claim that the Iron Curtain divided ecosystems and landscapes by arguing that the fortifications and all activities that kept them functional became causal – in direct or in mitigated fashion – to changes in the natural environment...   More >

A talk by Michelle Karnes: Telling Stories about Medieval Marvels

Lecture | March 13 | 5-7 p.m. | 330 Wheeler Hall

 Michelle Karnes, Associate Professor, Notre Dame Department of English

 Department of English, Medieval and Early Modern Coloquium

The Rise of Extractive Logics

Lecture | March 13 | 5-7 p.m. | 220 Stephens Hall

 Saskia Sassen, Columbia University

 The Program in Critical Theory, International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs, Global Urban Humanities

Among the strong patterns of the post-1980s period in “Western” societies is a mix of economic and political vectors marked by extractive logics. We can find such extractive logics in entities as diverse as mining and Facebook. The rise of such extractive logics is partial, but sufficiently powerful to have altered key features of our economies and societies. For instance, when mass consumption...   More >

Saskia Sassen

Senator Kevin de León: Dispatch from the Resistance

Lecture | March 13 | 5:30 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Senator Kevin de León

 Goldman School of Public Policy

5:30pm - Public Reception | 6:00pm - Public Lecture

About the Lecture and Speaker
Join the Goldman School of Policy, the Berkeley Forum, and California State Senate President Pro Tempore Kevin de León for a discussion on California’s climate policy leadership and its broader efforts to protect the state’s progressive policies, economy, and people from federal overreach.

As President...   More >

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

A Talk with Jon Leidecker, aka Wobbly

Lecture | March 14 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Jon Leidecker, aka Wobbly, Musician & Composer

 Arts + Design

Jon Leidecker aka Wobbly is a San Francisco–based musician/composer of experimental electronic music Member of the multimedia collective Negativland.

Jon Leidecker has been engaged with the medium of electronic music since the mid 1980's, performing in collaboration with others and appearing solo under the unchosen pseudonym 'Wobbly', with an emphasis on live performance and improvisation....   More >

Found Life: Poems, Stories, Comics, a Play, and an Interview

Lecture | March 14 | 4-6 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Stephens Lounge

 Linor Goralik, Author

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

One of the first Russian writers to make a name for herself on the Internet, Linor Goralik writes conversational short works that conjure the absurd in all its forms, reflecting post-Soviet life and daily universals. Her mastery of the minimal, including a wide range of experiments in different forms of micro-prose, is on full display in this collection of poems, stories, comics, a play, and an...   More >

Meditation and Nonconceptual Awareness: Perspectives from Buddhist Philosophy and Cognitive Science

Lecture | March 14 | 5-7 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Evan Thompson, University of British Columbia

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

Mindfulness meditation practices are often traditionally said to induce “nonconceptual” forms of awareness, and scientists and clinicians often repeat such descriptions. But what does “nonconceptual” mean? Clearly, without a precise specification of what a concept or conceptual cognition is, the notion of nonconceptuality is equally ill-defined. I present an account of concepts, concept...   More >

Covering Trump’s Presidency: Uncharted Waters: Please join us for a special evening event featuring top DC reporters from the Chicago Sun-Times, New York Times, Politico, Vanity Fair and the Washington Post.

Lecture | March 14 | 6-7:30 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center

 Maureen Orth, Vanity Fair; Carl Hulse, New York Times

 Jake Sherman, Politico

 Graduate School of Journalism

Special Invitation: Top DC Reporters talk Covering Trump's Presidency March 14 -- RSVP

  RSVP online by March 4.

ARCH Lecture: Peggy Deamer

Lecture | March 14 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, MAR 14, 6:30pm. Please join us for a talk with Peggy Deamer, Professor of Architecture at Yale University. This talk will focus on the positive implications and social and economic importance of understanding the nature of architectural work as WORK.

Annette Yoshiko Reed: Forgetting: the Jewish Past between Rupture and Renewal

Lecture | March 14 | 7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Annette Yoshiko Reed, Professor, New York University

 Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Chair in Jewish Studies, GTU Center for Jewish Studies, Lehrhaus Judaica, Jewish Studies Program at UC Davis, Taube Center for Jewish Studies at Stanford University

2018 Taubman Lecture Series

Lecture 2: Wednesday, March 14, 7 pm: How the Jewishness of Christianity was Forgotten

  RSVP online

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Bancroft Library Roundtable: California's Place in Anti-Slavery Litigation on the Eve of the Civil War

Lecture | March 15 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room

 Alexandra Havrylyshyn, J.D. and Ph.D. candidate, Jurisprudence and Social Policy, and Bancroft Library Study Award recipient, UC Berkeley

 Bancroft Library

New Orleans trial judge John McHenry ruled in favor of nearly twenty enslaved petitioners who sought freedom on the basis of having touched free soil, contravening Louisiana legislation. Havrylyshyn will explore the political identification of McHenry, who later resided in California, and the ways that anti-slavery litigation influenced California before the start of the Civil War.

Desert Borderland: The Making of Modern Egypt and Libya

Lecture | March 15 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Matthew H. Ellis, Sarah Lawrence College

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

How should we think about the emergence of territorial nationalism in the modern Middle East? Historians have typically emphasized cartography and border demarcation as necessary determinants of nation and state formation in the modern era. In this talk—based on his forthcoming book, Desert Borderland: The Making of Modern Egypt and Libya (Stanford UP, March 2018)—Matthew H. Ellis adopts a...   More >

Art in a State of Siege: Bosch in Retrospect: Joseph Leo Koerner, Art Historian

Lecture | March 15 | 5 p.m. | Doe Library, Morrison Reading Room, 101 Doe

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Koerner examines Hieronymus Bosch’s Garden of Delights—approaching the painting as a representation of a world without history and without law. The discussion emerges from a larger project in which Koerner explores the relationship between art and freedom under a range of emergency “states of siege,” including apartheid South Africa and Nazi Germany.

Pantheist Monstrosities: On Race, Gender, Divinity, and Dirt

Lecture | March 15 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Mary-Jane Rubenstein, Professor of Religion and Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Wesleyan University

 Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Lecture details forthcoming.

Mary-Jane Rubenstein is Professor of Religion at Wesleyan University; core faculty in the Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program; and affiliated faculty in the Science and Society Program.

Spring 2018 Del Chiaro Lecture: Characteristically Etruscan Italic And Etruscan Bronze Production In Context

Lecture | March 15 | 5:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Greg Warden, President and Professor of Archaeology, Franklin University, Switzerland

 The Mario A. Del Chiaro Center for the Ancient Italian Studies

Poster for Spring 2018 Del Chiaro Lecture

The Korean Challenge To US Foreign Policy

Lecture | March 15 | 5:30-7 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Ambassador Kathleen Stephens, William J. Perry Fellow, Korea Program, Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center

 Institute of International Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

Kathleen Stephens, a former U.S. ambassador to the Republic of Korea, is the William J. Perry Fellow in the Korea Program at the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (APARC). She has four decades of experience in Korean affairs, first as a Peace Corps volunteer in rural Korea in the 1970s, and in ensuing decades as a diplomat and as U.S. ambassador in Seoul.

Stephens came to...   More >

Annette Yoshiko Reed: Forgetting: the Jewish Past between Rupture and Renewal

Lecture | March 15 | 5:30 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Annette Yoshiko Reed, Professor, New York University

 Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Chair in Jewish Studies, GTU Center for Jewish Studies, Lehrhaus Judaica, Jewish Studies Program at UC Davis, Taube Center for Jewish Studies at Stanford University

2018 Taubman Lecture Series

Lecture 1: Monday, March 12, 7 pm: What Was Lost with the Dead Sea Scrolls

Lecture 2: Wednesday, March 14, 7 pm: How the Jewishness of Christianity was Forgotten

Lecture 3: Thursday, March 15, 5:30 pm: Forgetting and Remembering Second Temple Judaism
Lecture followed by reception with unforgettable delectables.

  RSVP online

Characteristically Etruscan: Etruscan and Italic Bronze Production in Context: The Annual Del Chiaro Lecture

Lecture | March 15 | 5:30-8:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Greg Warden, President, Franklin University, Switzerland

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

Love on the Line: 1947 revisited through theatre, dance, music, and conversation

Lecture | March 15 | 6-8 p.m. | Bechtel Engineering Center, Sibley Auditorium

 Abhishek Kaicker, Assistant Professor of History, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, EnActe Arts, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A theatrical production in which the loss of love, both human and idealogical, is explored through real, lived survivor stories of those who crossed the line of Partition in 1947.

Smart Cities: The future of urban infrastructure 2018 Martin Wachs Lecture

Lecture | March 15 | 6:10 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 Ryan Russo, Director, Oakland Department of Transportation; Tom Maguire, Director, Sustainable Streets at San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA); Maria Mehranian, Managing Partner and Chief Financial Officer, Cordoba Corporation; Susan Shaheen, Co-Director, Transportation Sustainability Research Center

 Jeff Morales, ITS Senior Fellow, ITS Berkelery

 Institute of Transportation Studies, College of Environmental Design, Center of Global Metropolitan Studies, Martin Wachs Distinguished Lecture in Transportation Fund, University of California Transportation Center, Berkeley Infrastructure Initiative of UC Berkeley's Social Science Matrix

Join us for the Smart Cities: The future of urban infrastructure 2018 Martin Wachs Lecture. The panel this year features former students, post docs and colleagues of Martin Wachs and will focus on the discussion of Smart Cities and the role that urban infrastructure and transportation will have.

Each year the annual Wachs Lecture draws innovative thinkers to the University of California to...   More >

Friday, March 16, 2018

Van/Vaspurakan: From Renaissance, to Resistance and Genocide

Lecture | March 16 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall

 Yektan Türkyılmaz, Henry S. Khanzadian Kazan Visiting Professor in Armenian Studies, Fresno State

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Armenian Studies Program

Through a brief overview of the turbulent nineteenth and especially the early twentieth centuries of Van/Vaspurakan Armenians this lecture will underscore the ways in which exploring this particular location challenges the conventional understandings regarding Armenian modernization, inter and intra-communal relations in the late Ottoman period and, particularly the Genocide.

The nineteenth...   More >

Habsburg Peacemaking and the Making of the Revolt in the Netherlands

Lecture | March 16 | 4-6 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Violet Soen, Rubens Chair for the History and Culture of the Low Countries, UC Berkeley; Professor of History, Leuven University

 Department of History, Dutch Studies, Rubens Chair for the History and Culture of the Low Countries

The Habsburg strategy for the pacification of the Dutch Revolt went beyond the mere military strategy uncovered by Geoffrey Parker, as it equally entailed the alternative of diplomacy. Unlike the Black Legend of the Spanish struggle for undisputed world dominion, Habsburg strategy did not renounce the possibility of finding a mediated middle ground. From the outset of the civil and religious...   More >

Hans Vredeman de Vries, Allegory on the surrender of Antwerp, 1585

The Child in Medieval Scandinavia: Challenging the Ariés Thesis

Lecture | March 16 | 4-6 p.m. | 3205 Dwinelle Hall

 Eva Österberg, Professor Emerita, Lund University

 Paula S. Fass, Margaret S. Byrne Professor Emerita, UC Berkeley

 Department of History, Department of Scandinavian

Eva Österberg is a scholar of the middle ages, and the early modern period, but her works also include the 19th and 20th centuries. She is particularly interested in Norbert Elias' concept of a civilizing process, Aron Gurevitj's ideas about medieval mentality, Philippe Ariès on childhood, and William Reddy and Barbara Rosenwein on emotions.

Monday, March 19, 2018

Politics of Religion in Post-Coup Turkey

Lecture | March 19 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 340 Stephens Hall

 Yunus Doğan Telliel, City University of New York

 Center for Middle Eastern Studies

While there remain many unanswered questions regarding the July 2016 coup attempt, most Turkish citizens seem to agree with the government that putschists were linked to Fethullah Gülen and the Hizmet movement. Although the government was decisive about what some call ‘de-Gülenification’ in state and private sectors, the possibility of a coup organized by a group of devout Muslims has puzzled...   More >

Extending the Cross-Straits Cold War into the Third World: Taiwanese International Development in Asia and Africa

Lecture | March 19 | 4 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 James Lin, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Strait Talk, UC Berkeley, Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

In 1959 in the face of Communist insurgency in north Vietnam, the Republic of Vietnam regime forwarded a request to Taiwan for twenty to thirty agricultural technicians to assist their rural development program and win the hearts and minds of Vietnamese villages. In response to this formed the inaugural Taiwanese international development mission that eventually was subsumed into Taiwan’s...   More >

A talk by Kirill Chepurin: Romantic Bliss: Wordsworth and Schelling

Lecture | March 19 | 5-6:30 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Kirill Chepuin, Senior Lecturer, Higher School of Economics

 Department of English, Eighteenth-Century and Romanticism Colloquium

ARCH Lecture: Nader Tehrani

Lecture | March 19 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

MON, MAR 19, 6:30pm. Please join us for a talk with Nader Tehrani, Dean of the Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture of the Cooper Union and Principal of NADAAA.

Yugoexport is the Name of this Oral Corporation

Lecture | March 19 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Irene Haiduk

 Arts + Design

The import-export business of making history demands an equivalence, a loyalty, and a familial solidarity between people and things. Such skills are best honed in conditions of blindness, where we cannot immediately tell what is in the room with us and whether it is alive or dead, person or thing, male or female.

Blind and non-aligned, the oral corporation extends its incorporation...   More >

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Freedom in the Colombian Rainforests: Bay Area Latin America Forum

Lecture | March 20 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2334 Bowditch (Center for Latin American Studies), Conference Room

 Center for Latin American Studies

The transition from slavery to freedom in the largest region in Spanish America inhabited mostly by black people has been aided by the geography of Colombia’s western rainforests. Access to a diverse environment – the jungle, soils and subsoils, rivers and the ocean – contributed to free people’s subsistence and allowed them to make commodities from nature.

Fishermen cast their nets in Chocó, western Colombia. (Photo by Quimbaya.)

AHMA Colloquium - The Theatrical Guild and Rome

Lecture | March 20 | 4 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall

 Kent Rigsby, Duke University

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

The AHMA Colloquium is a series of informal papers presented in the afternoon in 7205 Dwinelle Hall. It is hosted and organized by graduate students from the Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology Graduate Group.

Environmental Care and the Infrastructure of Indifference: Tanner Lectures on Human Values by Michael Warner

Lecture | March 20 | 4:10-6:15 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Michael Warner, Seymour H. Knox Professor of English, University of California, Los Angeles

 University of California, Berkeley

Michael Warner will present a three-day lecture series with commentary by Anahid Nersissian, Dale Jamieson, and Jedediah Purdy on March 20, 21, & 22, 2018. The first day's lecture is titled "On the Grid." The second day's lecture is titled "Infrastructure as Ethics." There will be a seminar and discussion on the third day. All days' events are free and open to the public. No tickets required.

Michael Warner

Mark Turin | Collaborations in Language: Revitalization and Resurgence in Himalayan South Asia

Lecture | March 20 | 5-6 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Mark Turin, Chair of the First Nations Languages Program and Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia

 Alexander von Rospatt, Professor, Buddhist and South Asian Studies; Acting Chair, South and Southeast Asian Studies; and Director, Himalayan Studies Initiative

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Himalayan Studies Program

Join us for two Nepal-related talks by anthropologists and scholars of Nepal, Prof. Mark Turin and Prof. Sara Shneiderman.

Magic Spells: A Research Workshop on Hebrew Amulets: With Magnes curators Shir Gal Kochavi, Zoe Lewin, and Francesco Spagnolo

Lecture | March 20 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Join Magnes curators in discovering the elaborate texts and imagery, magic formulas, and kabbalistic sources in Hebrew amulets.

Worn on one’s person or placed in homes, Jewish amulets are used at moments of vulnerability and transition, like childbirth, marriage, or illness. They feature texts including biblical verses, Psalms, divine names, and invocations of powerful figures like angels, and...   More >

Sara Shneiderman | Restructuring Life: Agencies and Infrastructures in Nepal’s Post-Conflict, Post-Disaster State of Transformation

Lecture | March 20 | 6-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Sara Shneiderman, Associate Professor in Anthropology and the Institute of Asian Research at the University of British Columbia

 Alexander von Rospatt, Professor, Buddhist and South Asian Studies; Acting Chair, South and Southeast Asian Studies; and Director, Himalayan Studies Initiative

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Himalayan Studies Program

Join us for two talks by anthropologists and scholars of Nepal, Prof. Sara Shneiderman and Prof. Mark Turin.

Gordon Douglas - Author Book Talk: The Help-Yourself City: Legitimacy and Inequality in DIY Urbanism

Lecture | March 20 | 7-8:30 p.m. | Wurster Hall, 210 - Environmental Design Library Atrium

 Gordon Douglas, San Jose State Unviersity

 Library

In The Help-Yourself City, Gordon Douglas looks closely at people who take urban planning into their own hands with homemade signs and benches, guerrilla bike lanes and more. Douglas explores the frustration, creativity, and technical expertise behind these interventions, but also the position of privilege from which they often come. The Help-Yourself City tells a street-level story of people's...   More >

The Help Yourself City

Author Book Talk: Gordon Douglas

Lecture | March 20 | 7-8:30 p.m. | 210 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

In The Help-Yourself City, Gordon Douglas looks closely at people who take urban planning into their own hands, exploring the frustration, creativity, and technical expertise behind these interventions

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Townsend Center Berkeley Book Chat: Elizabeth Honig with Svetlana Alpers: Jan Brueghel and the Senses of Scale

Lecture | March 21 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

In the first book-length study of Jan Brueghel, Pieter’s son, Professor of History of Art Elizabeth Honig reveals how the artist’s tiny detail-filled paintings questioned conceptions of distance, dimension, and style.

A Talk with Lynn Hershman Leeson

Lecture | March 21 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Lynn Hershman Leeson, Artist and Filmmaker, Professor Emeritus, University of California, Davis

 Arts + Design

Lynn Hershman Leeson is a Bay Area feminist artist, video/filmmaker and pioneering digital media artist.

Over the last four decades, artist and filmmaker Lynn Hershman Leeson has been internationally acclaimed for her art and films. One of the most influential media artists, Hershman Leeson is widely recognized for her innovative work investigating issues that are now recognized as key to the...   More >

Environmental Care and the Infrastructure of Indifference: Tanner Lectures on Human Values by Michael Warner

Lecture | March 21 | 4:10-6:15 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Michael Warner, Seymour H. Knox Professor of English, University of California, Los Angeles

 University of California, Berkeley

Michael Warner will present a three-day lecture series with commentary by Anahid Nersissian, Dale Jamieson, and Jedediah Purdy on March 20, 21, & 22, 2018. The first day's lecture is titled "On the Grid." The second day's lecture is titled "Infrastructure as Ethics." There will be a seminar and discussion on the third day. All days' events are free and open to the public. No tickets required.

The Politics and Metaphysics of Free Speech

Lecture | March 21 | 5:30-7 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310 Banatao Auditorium

 Harvey Mansfield, Harvard University

 Law, Boalt School of

March 21, 2018
5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
310 Banatao Auditorium, Sutardja Dai Hall, Berkeley

Harvey Mansfield: The Politics and Metaphysics of Free Speech
The purpose of free speech is making things intelligible to fellow human beings, as opposed to self-expression. Thus, the fundamental subject of free speech is justice, and our relationship with our fellows.

Thursday, March 22, 2018

Hungary’s Orbán Regime: Splitting the EU and Leading a New East European Bloc?

Lecture | March 22 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Paul Lendvai, Journalist

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Through a masterly and cynical manipulation of ethnic nationalism, and deep-rooted corruption, Prime Minister Orbán has exploited successive electoral victories to build a closely knit and super-rich oligarchy. More than any other EU leader, he wields undisputed power over his people.

Orbán’s ambitions are far-reaching. Hailed by governments and far-right politicians as the champion of a new...   More >

This Is Not My Mother’s Adobo!!!: The Cultural Politics of Philippine Cuisine in a Foodie World

Lecture | March 22 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Martin Manalansan IV, Associate Professor of Asian American Studies, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, Filipino & Philippine Studies Working Group

This talk examines recent declarations about Philippine Cuisine as the new exciting food trend in the culinary world. By interrogating notions of authenticity, appropriation, and commodification, the talk will attempt to "stir the pot" with issues of transnational culinary expertise and Filipino hiya (shame).

Martin Manalansan IV

Environmental Care and the Infrastructure of Indifference: Tanner Lectures on Human Values by Michael Warner

Lecture | March 22 | 4:10-6:15 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Michael Warner, Seymour H. Knox Professor of English, University of California, Los Angeles

 University of California, Berkeley

Michael Warner will present a three-day lecture series with commentary by Anahid Nersissian, Dale Jamieson, and Jedediah Purdy on March 20, 21, & 22, 2018. The first day's lecture is titled "On the Grid." The second day's lecture is titled "Infrastructure as Ethics." There will be a seminar and discussion on the third day. All days' events are free and open to the public. No tickets required.

Michael Warner

Gregory Maxwell Bruce | Travels through Four Languages: Shibli's Great Journey

Lecture | March 22 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Dr. Gregory Maxwell Bruce, Lecturer in Urdu, Dept. of South and Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

 Munis Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Professor of India Studies; Associate Professor in the Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by UC Berkeley's Urdu language lecturer, Dr. Gregory Maxwell Bruce. Dr. Bruce is a scholar of Islam in South Asia and Urdu Literature.

Friday, March 23, 2018

Towards Vision Zero: Intelligent Intersection Infrastructure to enhance safe operations of (self-driving) cars

Lecture | March 23 | 4 p.m. | 502 Davis Hall

 Pravin Varaiya, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Transportation Studies

Abstract: Vision Zero plans concentrate on intersections that present a demanding environment. Challenges arise from complex vehicle trajectories; absence of lane markings to guide vehicles; split phases that prevent determining who has the right of way; conflicting vehicle approaches with no line of sight; illegal movements; simultaneous interactions among pedestrians, bicycles and vehicles....   More >

Monday, March 26, 2018

AHMA Colloquium - The Munich Doryphoros: Venerated - Surppressed - Forgotten

Lecture | March 26 | 4-5 p.m. | 7205 Dwinelle Hall | Note change in date

 Rolf Schneider, Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

The AHMA Colloquium is a series of informal papers presented in the afternoon in 7205 Dwinelle Hall. It is hosted and organized by graduate students from the Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology Graduate Group.