<< Wednesday, December 04, 2019 >>

Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Townsend Book Chat with Grace Lavery: Quaint, Exquisite: Victorian Aesthetics and the Idea of Japan

Lecture | December 4 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Lavery examines the contradictory role — as both rival empire and cradle of exquisite beauty — played by Japan in the Victorian imagination.

Fung Institute presents: Engineering Leadership Speaking Series

Lecture | September 4 – December 4, 2019 every Wednesday with exceptions | 4-5:30 p.m. | 310 Sutardja Dai Hall

 Fung Institute for Engineering Leadership

Join UC Berkeley Master of Engineering students for an executive speaker series with leaders from different technology industries. The technology industry forms a vital part of the Northern California economy and these sessions provide an opportunity to deepen your understanding and connections. Engage with innovative leaders from top companies, deepen your industry and functional knowledge and...   More >

Archipelagic Vietnam: Rethinking Nationalism and Trans-Pacific Regionalism at the Shoreline

Lecture | December 4 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 David Biggs, Professor of History, UC Riverside

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

Until recent conflicts over the South China Sea, Vietnam’s history has been almost wholly described in terrestrial terms. Seaborne connections across the East Sea and the Pacific have however played key roles in defining modern Vietnam. This talk reimagines Vietnam as an archipelago, a more permeable nation-system of nodes linked by flows of energy, food, people and technology.

David Biggs

First Step(pe)s: The Silk Road from a Steppe Perspective

Lecture | December 4 | 5-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Ursula B. Brosseder, Bonn University

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

Numerous, far-reaching migrations and contacts have taken place during prehistory across the vast Eurasian steppes, reaching from Eastern Europe or the Near East to Inner Asia and present-day China. However, the intensity and speed of connectivity between East and West changed profoundly in the late first millennium BC. Traditional narrative holds that this change was initiated by the travels of...   More >