<< Monday, November 06, 2017 >>

Monday, November 6, 2017

New Research in Oral History: Shanna Farrell: Bay Area Cocktails: An Oral History of Culture, Community and Craft

Lecture | November 6 | 12-1:15 p.m. | Bancroft Library, 267 -- Oral History Center Conference Room

 Shanna Farrell, Oral History Center, The Bancroft Library, UC Berkeley

 Oral History Center

An American invention, the cocktail fluctuated in popularity following Prohibition and had firmly taken root in the culinary landscape by the 1990s. The Bay Area played a significant role in reviving it—as much as New York and London. From the distillers who pioneered craft spirits and Alice Waters’ revolutionary take on simple, fresh food at Chez Panisse to the bartenders who cared enough to...   More >

Dalí's Origins: Drawings and Paintings from the Cusí Collection

Lecture | November 6 | 12-1 p.m. | 5125 Dwinelle Hall

 Jordi Falgàs, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí

 Institute of European Studies, Department of Spanish & Portuguese

Joaquim Cusí was a friend of Salvador Dalí’s father and he became an enthusiastic supporter of the young artist. Mr. Cusí was a successful pharmacist with no training in art, and yet he was the first one to purchase numerous paintings and drawings from Dalí’s earliest exhibitions. The works acquired by Mr. Cusí were not seen again on display during his lifetime, and scholars were never allowed to...   More >

When Conflicting Racisms Converge: Race, Nation and Segregation: Lecture with Rebecca Herman

Lecture | November 6 | 4 p.m. | 2334 Bowditch (Center for Latin American Studies), Conference Room

 Rebecca Herman

 Center for Latin American Studies

During World War II, workers from across Latin America and the Caribbean traveled to the Panama Canal to work on defense construction projects for the U.St. When they arrived, they encountered a binary system of segregation. that did not accord with their racial constructs and identities. This talk will consider how race, nation and segregation divided Allies engaged in a purported war for democracy.

The Gatun Locks of the Panama Canal in 1936. (Photo by E.O. Goldbeck/Library of Congress.)

The Power of Writing with Abandon: a Talk by Grant Faulkner

Lecture | November 6 | 5-7 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 Grant Faulkner, Executive Director, National Novel Writing Month

 Department of English

Grant Faulkner, executive director of National Novel Writing Month, will discuss his new book, Pep Talks for Writers, and how writers must dive in, banish their inner editors, and take creative risks by writing with abandon. Come ready to write with abandon!

LAEP Lecture: Ferdinand Ludwig

Lecture | November 6 | 5:30-7 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

Monday, Nov 6, 6:00PM, Wurster Auditorium

We must conjure our Gods before we obey them: Arts + Design Mondays at BAMPFA

Lecture | November 6 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Michael Rock, Designer, 2x4, New York

 Arts + Design

Design has become so elastic it is applied universally from chromosomes to climate change. We design spoons and tables and rooms and houses and computer programs and cities and power grids and national identities and international treaties and defense systems and, when all else fails, military campaigns. If design is anything that is planned and brought to fruition by human ingenuity, we’ve...   More >

We Must Conjure Our Gods Before We Obey Them

Lecture | November 6 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  BAMPFA

 Michael Rock, 2x4 Inc.

 Department of Architecture

Michael Rock, acclaimed designer, educator, and author talks about the pervasive influence of design in contemporary life. He is a founding partner and creative director 2x4 Inc., a multi-disciplinary design studio in New York City, and Director of the Graphic Architecture Project at the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation

Chasing the Shadows of the Past in Late Ottoman Argos

Lecture | November 6 | 8-9 p.m. |  Alumni House

 Jonathan M. Hall, University of Chicago

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

If there is one sentiment that is common to nearly all the accounts written by European travelers to the Peloponnesian town of Argos during the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries, it is one of profound disappointment and shock at the lack of visible remains of a city whose fame had been so lauded in antiquity. Inevitably, perhaps, imagination filled the void that autopsy was unable to...   More >