Merck-Banyu Lectureship: Exploring Stable Yet Unusual π-Electron Materials by Making Use of Phosphorus and Sulfur

Seminar | October 22 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall | Canceled

 Aiko Fukazawa, Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences

 College of Chemistry

The π-conjugated systems are indispensable building blocks in organic chemistry when we aim to attain optical and/or electronic functions with organic compounds. The molecular design of π-conjugated systems with unusual electronic structure and thus optical and/or electronic properties are of increasing importance for both progress of fundamental molecular science and development of next-generation optoelectronic materials. To this end, incorporation of main-group elements has been recognized as the one of the promising approaches toward the molecular design of π-conjugated systems with unusual electronic structure and thus optical and/or electronic properties. However, this approach often poses a challenge of compromise between unusual electronic structure and chemical stability of the resulting π-systems.
To tackle this issue, our group have so far focused on the latent characteristics of phosphorus and sulfur, the 3rd row p-block elements that forms rather strong bonds with carbon, and developed a number of novel -electron systems with optical and/or electronic functions. These studies not only led to the generation of several outstanding functional materials including fluorescent probes with exceptional photostability,1 NIR-emissive yet stable fluorophores,2 two-electron-absorbing dyes,3 and solution-processable semiconductors,4 but also provided various new concepts in the rational molecular design of functional -electron systems. In this presentation, I will describe the overview of our work and some of recent studies on the sulfur-containing heterocycles towards 1) the renaissance of the chemistry of nonbenzenoid hydrocarbons,5 and 2) the unconventional approach for solubilizing and molecular alignment of π-conjugated systems.4

References
[1] (a) A. Fukazawa, M. Taki, T. Higashiyama, S. Yamaguchi et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2015, 54, 4539. (b) A. Fukazawa, M. Taki, T. Higashiyama, S. Yamaguchi et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2015, 54, 15213. (c) M. Taki, Y. Sato, A. Fukazawa, S. Yamaguchi et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2017, 139, 10374. (d) T. Ohzono, A. Fukazawa et al. Sci. Rep. 2017, 7, 16814. (e) T. Ohzono, A. Fukazawa et al. Communications Chemistry, 2018, 1, 52.
[2] (a) A. Fukazawa, S. Yamaguchi et al. Chem. Commun. 2016, 52, 1120. (b) A. Fukazawa, S. Yamaguchi et al. Chem. Commun. 2017, 53, 8565.
[3] (a) A. Fukazawa, S. Yamaguchi et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2008, 47, 5582. (b) A. Fukazawa, S. Yamaguchi et al. Chem. Asian J. 2010, 5, 466–469.
[4] (a) A. Fukazawa, T. Okamoto, S. Yamaguchi et al. Chem. Eur. J. 2018, 24, 11503.
[5] (a) A. Fukazawa, K. Yoshizawa, S. Yamaguchi et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 1731. (b) A. Fukazawa, S. Yamaguchi et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, 136, 8738. (c) A. Fukazawa, S. Yamaguchi et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2015, 54, 7636. (d) A. Fukazawa, S. Yamaguchi et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2017, 56, 3270.

Aiko Fukazawa studied chemistry at Kyoto University where she obtained her B. Eng. degree and M. Eng. degree in 2002 and 2004, respectively, under the supervision of Professor Kohei Tamao. On the way to pursing her doctorate at the same university, she moved to Professor Shigehiro Yamaguchi’s research group in Graduate School of Science at Nagoya University as an assistant professor in 2006, received her Dr. Sci. from Nagoya University in 2008, and promoted to an associate professor in August 2013. She also spent two months to work with Professor Warren E. Piers at University of Calgary as a visiting scholar in 2011. Since November 2018, she moved to iCeMS, Kyoto University as a full professor. Since January 2019, she will be concurrently serving as an adjunct professor in the Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry in the Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, and an affiliated researcher in the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM) in Nagoya University. Based on her achievements in the field of main-group chemistry, she received several awards including Inoue Research Aid for Young Scientists (2009), Asian Core Program Lectureship Award to Taiwan and Singapore (2010), The Chemical Society of Japan Award for Distinguished Young Chemists (2014), Nozoe Young Scientist Award (2017), Thieme Chemistry Journals Award (2019), and Lectureship Award MBLA (2019). Her research interests include the development of novel functional organic materials on the basis of physical organic chemistry and main group chemistry.

 510-643-0572