Disentangling The Strange Metal: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | April 5 | 2-3 p.m. | 4 LeConte Hall

 Prof. James Analytis, UC Berkeley, Physics

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

"Connecting Superconductivity and Quantum Criticality with the High-Field Hall Effect in a Strange Metal"

Unconventional superconductivity, and high−Tc superconductivity in particular, remains one of the most distinctively intractable problems in physics. The existence of a common phenomenology which links these materials into a class known as “strange metals", provides hope that there is unifying theory that describes them.

In this presentation, we show that the Hall effect of the unconventional superconductor BaFe2(As1−xPx)2 contains an anomalous contribution arising from the correlations within the strange metal. By leveraging the dependence of the Hall coefficient at high magnetic fields we are able to map the evolution of the strange metal, giving a quantitative measure of the correlated contribution in a manner that is not possible from studying the temperature dependence alone.

In this way we can show that superconductivity is connected to the zero temperature physics of the strange metal phenomenology, and that this strange metallic behavior must arise from fluctuations of a nearby quantum critical point.

These observations create a clear but unexpected picture of strange metals that reframes our understanding of the relationship between strong correlations, quantum phase transitions, and superconductivity.

|Our research focuses on the discovery and understanding of exotic materials manifesting novel quantum phenomena that have both fundamental and technological implications, particularly superconductors, exotic magnets and topological materials. Many of the physical problems we are interested in transcend a single material. Each compound can lend a new insight into a given question. Where possible, our strategy is to use materials as a tool to get to scientifically important problems by designing and tuning their properties.

Our lab’s focus is to create materials with properties that push the boundaries of our understanding of condensed matter physics. |
*****
James Analytis did his PhD at Oxford as a Rhodes' Scholar and postdoc at Stanford. After a few years there as staff scientist, he joined the physics faculty here at UCB in 2013.

 510-643-6681