<< Tuesday, November 13, 2018 >>

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Fall 2018 Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science

Lecture | October 30 – December 4, 2018 every Tuesday | 190 Doe Library

 Deb Agarwal, Department Head, Data Science and Technology, Computational Research Division, LBNL; Rosemary Gillespie, Professor, Environmental Science, Policy & Management; Rachel Slaybaugh, Assistant Professor, Nuclear Engineering

 Kristina Hill, Associate Professor, Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning and Urban Design

 Data Sciences

The Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science, co-hosted by the The Berkeley Division of Data Sciences and the Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS), return for the Fall 2018 series. Lectures feature Berkeley faculty doing visionary research that illustrates the character of the ongoing data revolution.

Historiography and Migration: Explaining the Present through the Lens of History

Lecture | November 13 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Paul Voerkel

 Institute of European Studies

Discussions about migration have dominated the public discourse in Germany since the “refugee crisis” of 2015. There is a growing acceptance of empiric data on migration, collected by research institutions like the IMIS at Osnabrück University. On the other hand, the public discourse – including from the government – is getting more emotional and often denies proven facts and figures.
After a...   More >

Precarious Inclusion as a Strategy of Government

Lecture | November 13 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall

 Center for Race and Gender

To what extent and how can those excluded from membership in the welfare state, but who are still present within its territorial borders, be lives to be cared for? How is the decision to care for certain lives made? What role do front line service providers play in (re)producing, defining, and negotiating state borders?

Building a Nation, Effacing a Race: The "Chinaman" Question of the U.S. in the Philippines, 1898-1905

Lecture | November 13 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Richard Chu, Five College Associate Professor of History, University of Massachusetts-Amherst

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Filipino and Philippine Studies Working Group

The lecture focuses on the first few years of American colonial rule in the Philippines. In particular, it looks into the “Chinaman” labor question facing the colonial rulers. How were the Chinese exclusion laws applied in the Philippines? How were the Chinese and other ethnic groups racialized to justify these laws in the Philippines?

Richard Chu

Environmental Justice: What can we do about the disproportionate impact of climate change on low-income communities?: By Van Jones, President and Founder, Dream Corps

Lecture | November 13 | 1:30-2:30 p.m. | David Brower Center, Goldman Theater

 2150 ALLSTON WAY, SUITE 100, Berkeley, CA 94720

 Van Jones, Dream Corps

 College of Natural Resources

Across America, low-income and minority communities are being hit hardest by the economic and health impacts of climate change. Join us for an afternoon with Van Jones—news commentator, author, and founder of Dream Corps —and learn how we can seek environmental justice for the country’s most vulnerable communities.

Van Jones is president and founder of the nonprofit, Dream Corps, a social...   More >

Anthropology from Portugal, on Portugal and beyond Portugal: racialized relations and representations

Lecture | November 13 | 3-5 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Paula Mota Santos; Cristiana Bastos

 Institute of European Studies, Portuguese Studies Program

Paula Mota Santos will speak about "Slavery as dark heritage in Post-colonial Portugal". The Lagos, Southern Portugal slavery exhibition is only the second European-located museum space dedicated to the transatlantic slave trade, and one institutionally linked to UNESCO’s Slave Route program. I will carry out an analysis of the images, texts and forms of display of the Lagos exhibition will be...   More >

Rewriting History in the Age of #MeToo

Lecture | November 13 | 4-6 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Amy Stanley, Associate Professor of History, Northwestern University

 Department of History, Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Department of History Committee on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (CEDI), History Graduate Association (HGA)

The #MeToo movement is now over a year old, but over the past few weeks its stakes have become increasingly clear, not only in American culture and politics but also in many of our intellectual lives as historians. This talk considers how the rallying call “believe women” challenges our epistemology and might lead us to a different approach to our evidence. The sources are drawn from an early...   More >

Presence and Memory: Commemorating the Buddha in Late Burmese Wall Paintings

Lecture | November 13 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Alexandra Green, Henry Ginsburg Curator for Southeast Asia, British Museum

 Center for Buddhist Studies, Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Department of History of Art, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies

This presentation draws upon art historical, anthropological, and religious studies methodologies to analyze Burmese temple wall paintings from the late 17th to early 19th centuries and elucidate the contemporary religious, political, and social concepts that drove the creation of this lively art form.

The bodhisatta Bhuridatta meditating

Integrating eco-evolutionary data from islands to infer biodiversity dynamics: Berkeley Distinguished Lectures in Data Science

Lecture | November 13 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 190 Doe Library

 Rosemary Gillespie, Professor, Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, UC Berkeley

 Berkeley Institute for Data Science

A central challenge in understanding the origins of biodiversity is that, while we can observe and test local ecological phenomena, we must usually infer the longer-term outcomes of these ecological forces indirectly. My colleagues and I have been developing inferential models at the interface between macroecology and population-level processes, and applying them to data from geological...   More >

Twentieth-Century Anti-Utopianism and its West German Antidote

Lecture | November 13 | 5 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Jennifer Allen, Yale University

 Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies, GHI West, the Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC

This talk picks up a melancholic thread in assessments of the end of the Cold War, when the triumph of liberal democracy and capitalism over “really existing socialism” led academics and public intellectuals to pronounce the end of utopian ambitions. Margaret Thatcher captured this idea in her claim that “there is no alternative.” Some West Germans, however, resisted this logic. Facing the...   More >

Poland at 100: The Continuing Challenges of Nationhood

Lecture | November 13 | 5:30-7 p.m. | Graduate Theological Union, Dinner Board Room

 John Connelly, Professor, History, UC Berkeley

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), SF-Krakow Sister City Association, Taube Philanthropies, Richard S. Dinner Center for Jewish Studies, Graduate Theological Union

This talk will consider the meanings and consequences of the reemergence of a Polish state in 1918 in new boundaries, after 125 years of rule by foreign powers. The event is celebrated as liberation, but what did it mean for ethnic minorities like Jews and Ukrainians? What did it mean for women? That Poland lasted barely twenty years before being overwhelmed by its totalitarian neighbors. Could...   More >

The Archaeology of Megiddo: New Light on the History of Ancient Israel

Lecture | November 13 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310 Banatao Auditorium

 Israel Finkelstein, Tel Aviv University

 Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

By far the most important ancient city in Israel, Megiddo has worn many hats over the past five thousand years. During the Bronze Age, the city hosted cosmopolitan Canaanite kings whose relationships extended to Egypt, Turkey, and Mesopotamia. One thousand years later, ancient Israel's kings garrisoned the city, noting its strategic military position. Later writers so revered the city that they...   More >