<< Thursday, October 25, 2018 >>

Thursday, October 25, 2018

Bodies and Boundaries: Arts, Migrations, and Identities with Allan deSouza

Lecture | October 25 |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Allan deSouza

 Arts + Design

In this talk, Alex Saragoza and Allan deSouza will hold a lively discussion on the relationships between art and migrations—both literal and metaphorical.
Allan deSouza is a Bay Area multi-media artist. His photography, installation, text and performance works restage colonial material culture through counter-strategies of fiction, erasure, and (mis)translation. His work has been exhibited...   More >

Gary Bass | Nixon, Kissinger, and a Forgotten Genocide

Lecture | October 25 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)

 Gary Bass, Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University

 Munis D. Faruqui, Director, Institute for South Asia Studies; Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies; Associate Professor, South & South East Asian Studies

 The Subir and Malini Chowdhury Center for Bangladesh Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies, Human Rights Center

A talk by professor of politics and international affairs at Princeton University and author of "The Blood Telegram: Nixon, Kissinger, and a Forgotten Genocide," Prof. Gary Bass

Political and Operatic Mythologies in Contemporary Italy: Lega Nord's "Va Pensiero"

Lecture | October 25 | 5-6 p.m. | 128 Morrison Hall

 Marina Romani, Lecturer, UC Berkeley / Contributing Writer, San Francisco Opera

 Institute of European Studies, Department of Italian Studies, Department of Music

From operatic Risorgimento fantasies to patriotic myths propagated by the fascist regime, the figure of composer Giuseppe Verdi and of one of his most popular choruses, “Va pensiero,” have become potent receptacles of Italian nationalistic sentiment. One of the most recent displays of cultural re-appropriation is peculiar: since the early 1990s, “Va pensiero” has been claimed as its anthem by...   More >

The Color of Monogamy in Shakespeare's Sonnets

Lecture | October 25 | 5-7 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, Maude Fife Room, 315 Wheeler

 Melissa Sanchez, Department of English, Univ. of Pennsylvania

 Department of English

Shakespeare’s Sonnets register the development of a fiction of somatic, heritable whiteness as a correlate of respectable sexuality, one disseminated in Renaissance celebrations of classical male friendship and imperial allegories of sexual conquest. Yet in their depiction of the entanglements among the poetic speaker, a “fair” young man, a “black” mistress, and unnamed others, the Sonnets...   More >

Reflections on the Movement to Revive the Precepts in Kamakura Japan: With a focus on Eison’s 叡尊 Chōmonshū 聴聞集

Lecture | October 25 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Paul Groner, University of Virginia

 Center for Buddhist Studies

Although Japanese monks are renowned for their disregard for the precepts and monastic discipline, serious monks were concerned with whether they actually were proper Buddhists or not. Professor Groner uses a set of fragments from Eison’s 叡尊 (1201-1290) to explore how serious monks strove to revive the precepts and ordinations. By delving into the background of some of the fragments...   More >

Anatomy of a Genocide: The Life and Death of a Town Called Buczacz

Lecture | October 25 | 5:15-7 p.m. |  Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life (2121 Allston Way)

 Omer Bartov, John P. Birkelund Distinguished Professor of European History, Brown University

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Center for Jewish Studies, Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life

Omer Bartov is the John P. Birkelund Distinguished Professor of European History at Brown University. He is the author of Anatomy of a Genocide: The Life and Death of a Town Called Buczacz, along with several other well-respected scholarly works on the Holocaust and genocide, including Hitler’s Army, Germany’s War and the Holocaust: Disputed Histories and Erased: Vanishing Traces of...   More >

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