<< Wednesday, January 18, 2017 >>

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Pseudorandomness Boot Camp

Workshop | January 17 – 20, 2017 every day |  Calvin Laboratory (Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing)

 Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing

The Boot Camp is intended to acquaint program participants with the key themes of the program.

Organizers:
Jacob Fox (Stanford University), Ben Green (University of Oxford), Russell Impagliazzo (UC San Diego), Luca Trevisan (Simons Institute, UC Berkeley), Julia Wolf (University of Bristol), David Zuckerman (University of Texas, Austin).

  Register online

Computer Health Matters: User Friendly Workstations (BEUHS400)

Workshop | January 18 | 8:30-9:30 a.m. | Tang Center, University Health Services, Class of '42

 Greg Ryan, Ergonomics@Work; Mallory Lynch, Ergonomics@Work

 Ergonomics@Work, University Health Services

Learn how to set up a user-friendly workstation and practice stretches to help relieve computer-related aches and pains. This workshop is required to qualify for computer ergonomics matching funds.

  Register online

Keyboards and Mice: Ergonomic Alternatives (BEUHS401)

Workshop | January 18 | 9:45-10:45 a.m. | Tang Center, University Health Services, Class of '42

 Greg Ryan, Ergonomics@Work

 Ergonomics@Work, University Health Services

Learn about the ergonomics of keyboards and pointing devices, including appropriate workstation set-up, postures, and techniques for using them. Find out about the keyboards and pointing devices covered by the Computer Ergonomics Matching Funds Program.

  Register online

Pasteur's quadrant: Advancing basic cognitive neuroscience with real-world relevance

Seminar | January 18 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Melina Uncapher, Assistant Professor of Neurology, UCSF CEO, Institute of Applied Neuroscience

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Researchers of cognition and the brain likely consider our efforts as advancing mechanistic understanding, with the hope that they will eventually impact real-world problems. However, this dichotomous viewpoint between basic and applied research is becoming less appropriate with increasing advances in science and technology, and increased dialog between researchers and practitioners. In this...   More >

Getting Started in Undergraduate Research and Finding a Mentor Workshop

Workshop | January 18 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 1229 Dwinelle Hall

 Leah Carroll

 Office of Undergraduate Research

Getting Started in Undergraduate Research

If you are thinking about getting involved in undergraduate research, this workshop is a great place to start! You will get a broad overview of the research opportunities available to undergraduates on campus, and suggestions on how to find them.

We will also let you know about upcoming deadlines and eligibility requirements for some of...   More >

Matrix Computations and Scientific Computing Seminar: Fastest algorithms for structured matrices via algebra

Seminar | January 18 | 11:10 a.m.-12 p.m. | 380 Soda Hall

 Lek-Heng Lim, University of Chicago

 Department of Mathematics

We show that in many instances, at the heart of a problem in numerical computation sits a special 3-tensor, the structure tensor of the problem that uniquely determines its underlying algebraic structure. For example, the Grothendieck constant, which plays an important role in unique games conjecture and SDP relaxations of NP-hard problems, arises as the spectral norm of such a structure tensor....   More >

The neurobiology of homeostasis

Seminar | January 18 | 12-1 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 Zachary Knight, University of California, San Francisco

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Characterizing ion sequestration in mitochondria: A deep view into cell ultrastructure with cryo-scanning transmission electron tomography

Seminar | January 18 | 2-3 p.m. | 177 Stanley Hall

 Sharon Wolf, Senior Research Fellow and Head of the Electron Microscopy Unit, Weizmann Institute of Science

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Topology Seminar (Introductory Talk): Group actions on the circle and surfaces

Seminar | January 18 | 2:10-3 p.m. | 736 Evans Hall

 Sebastian Hurtado, University of Chicago

 Department of Mathematics

A smooth group action on a manifold M is a group-morphism from a group G to the group of diffeomorphisms of M. If G = Z, the study of such actions is just the study of smooth dynamics and classification is impossible. However, if the group G is sufficiently rich or under some hypothesis in the type of action, classification is sometimes possible. A classical example is Holder's theorem (1901),...   More >

Seminar: Dr. Edward Chuong, University of Utah

Seminar | January 18 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 Center for Computational Biology

Title: Endogenous retroviruses as catalysts of gene regulatory evolution

Abstract: Changes in gene regulatory networks underlie many biological adaptations, but the mechanisms promoting their emergence and evolution are not well understood. Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are prolific genomic parasites that constitute 6-14% of vertebrate genomes, and harbor sequences capable of modulating...   More >

Endogenous retroviruses as catalysts of gene regulatory evolution

Seminar | January 18 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 **Edward Chuong**, University of Utah

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Applied Math Seminar: Nonequilibrium stochastic processes at single-molecule and single-cell levels

Seminar | January 18 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Hao Ge, Peking University

 Department of Mathematics

Stochastic process has a glorious history in physics, chemistry and biology. Due to the advance of single-molecule techniques, stochastic modeling and computation become more and more useful and popular recently. I will talk about several different issues related to stochastic processes at single-molecule and single-cell levels, including stochastic theory of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics,...   More >

Nonequilibrium stochastic processes at single-molecule and single-cell levels

Seminar | January 18 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 891 Evans Hall

 Hao Ge, Peking University

 Department of Mathematics

Stochastic process has a glorious history in physics, chemistry and biology. Due to the advance of single-molecule techniques, stochastic modeling and computation become more and more useful and popular recently. I will talk about several different issues related to stochastic processes at single-molecule and single-cell levels, including stochastic theory of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics,...   More >

Number Theory Seminar: Integral relations between p-adic cohomology theories

Seminar | January 18 | 3:40-5 p.m. | 939 Evans Hall

 Kestutis Cesnavicius, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

I will give an introduction to this semester's number theory learning seminar, whose goal is to discuss the relations that result from the techniques of Bhatt–Morrow–Scholze between different integral cohomology theories (p-adic etale, de Rham, crystalline...) of varieties over p-adic fields. Such relations may be viewed as refinements of the comparison theorems of "rational" p-adic Hodge...   More >

Kernel methods for spatiotemporal learning with public policy applications

Seminar | January 18 | 4-5 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Seth Flaxman, Department of Statistics, Oxford

 Department of Statistics

In this talk I will highlight the statistical machine learning methods that I am developing, in response to the needs of my social science collaborators, to address public policy questions. My research focuses on flexible nonparametric modeling approaches for spatiotemporal data and scalable inference methods to be able to fit these models to large datasets. Most critically, my models and...   More >

Michael Kiparsky-Colloquium

Colloquium | January 18 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 126 Barrows Hall

 Michael Kiparsky, Director, Wheeler Water Institute

 Energy and Resources Group

Topology Seminar (Main Talk): Burnside problem for diffeomorphism groups

Seminar | January 18 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 3 Evans Hall

 Sebastian Hurtado, University of Chicago

 Department of Mathematics

Suppose G is a finitely generated group such that every element has finite order. Must G be a finite group?

This is known as the burnside problem, it was formulated around 1902 by Burnside himself and it was central in the development of group theory during the 20th century. The answer in general turned out to be negative, G might be infinite. Nonetheless, if one restricts G to be a linear group...   More >

From Direct Action to Social Movements

Panel Discussion | January 18 | 5-7 p.m. |  2521 Channing Way (Inst. for Res. on Labor & Employment)

 Rachel Herzing, Co-Director, Center for Political Education

 Danielle Mahones, Labor Education Specialist, Labor Center; Tina Sandoval, Worker Leader, Fight for $15

 American Cultures, UC Berkeley Labor Center, Office of Undergraduate Research

The AC Center and The UC Berkeley Labor Center are pleased to announce an evening discussion 'From Direct Action to Social Movements,' which will include a panel of community organizers, faculty and labor leaders, addressing movement building is created and sustained.