<< Tuesday, October 16, 2018 >>

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Indigenous Peoples in India: Social Consequences of Land Rights Legislation: Gender and Resilience

Lecture | October 16 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 554 Barrows Hall

 Indrani Sigamany

 Native American Studies & Ethnic Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

In the Aravalli Hill forests of Rajasthan, where access to justice remains uneven and elusive for indigenous peoples, a group of Adivasi women are claiming land rights through activistism. In the context of gender inequality in predominantly patriarchal societies, the threat to loss of lands, forest based livelihoods and traditional conservation, is experienced more acutely by women.

Indigenous Peoples in India: Social Consequences of Land Rights Legislation: Gender and Resilience

Lecture | October 16 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 554 Barrows Hall

 Indrani Sigamany

 Native American Studies & Ethnic Studies, Institute for South Asia Studies

In the Aravalli Hill forests of Rajasthan, where access to justice remains uneven and elusive for indigenous peoples, a group of Adivasi women are claiming land rights through activistism. In the context of gender inequality in predominantly patriarchal societies, the threat to loss of lands, forest based livelihoods and traditional conservation, is experienced more acutely by women.

Addressing Us: On the Transformations of Public Space as Art —Hegel, Arendt, and Jacobi Revisited

Lecture | October 16 | 5-7 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Marita Tatari, Feodor-Lynen-Fellow (Humboldt Foundation), German Department, UC Berkeley

 The Program in Critical Theory

Hegel on art as action and Arendt on action as public space converge. This convergence is not about what action, art and public space should be. It is about the historical transformations of the common condition—the symbolic order—as it relates to heterogeneity. Surprisingly, both Hegel and Arendt reveal a view of these transformations that is not that of the subject and its purposiveness....   More >