<< Wednesday, March 07, 2018 >>

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Collaborating Effectively in the Workplace

Workshop | March 7 | 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | University Hall, Room 24

 Sara Thacker, Staff Ombuds Office

 Staff Ombuds Office

To be successful in the rapidly changing workplace, where jobs and people change fast – staff must be able to collaborate with a variety of people within and outside the organization who have the skills, resources, and influence to tackle increasing complex challenges. Collaboration is a skill and a set of practices that are rarely taught in the workplace. In this course staff will learn about...   More >

Civil and Environmental Engineering Department Seminar: Advanced Simulation Methodologies for Seismic Hazard and Risk Assessment

Seminar | March 7 | 10-11 a.m. | 542 Davis Hall

 Floriana Petrone

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

Moderate-to-large magnitude earthquakes still represent a major issue for the safety of ordinary and critical infrastructure. Despite significant advances in the seismic engineering field, much research is still needed to gain better understanding of the science and engineering behind earthquake phenomenon and develop effective risk assessment methodologies.

UCB Startup Fair

Career Fair | March 7 | 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Pauley Ballroom

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

The UCB Startup Fair is back!

Student-run by IEEE, HKN, and CSUA, students are introduced to small tech companies that typically rely on personal connections for hiring. It's a great way for students to find full-time and internship positions! Attendance is free for all UCB students!

MVZ LUNCH SEMINAR - Bret Payseur: Genetics of rapid and extreme size evolution in island mice

Seminar | March 7 | 12-1 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, 3101 VLSB, Grinnell-Miller Library

 Bret Payseur

 Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

MVZ Lunch is a graduate level seminar series (IB264) based on current and recent vertebrate research. Professors, graduate students, staff, and visiting researchers present on current and past research projects. The seminar meets every Wednesday from 12- 1pm in the Grinnell-Miller Library. Enter through the MVZ's Main Office, 3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, and please let the receptionist...   More >

On a Lesser Known Montreality: French Among the City's Haitian Youth

Colloquium | March 7 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Luc Baronian, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi

 Canadian Studies Program (CAN))

Haitian Creole possesses certain features in common with French as spoken in Montréal. For example, both spoken languages affricate /t, d/ before high front vowels, both contain traces of a former palatalization, both have a progressive marker based on the word for 'after' and both share certain Amerindian borrowings such as "boucane / boukan". For nearly half a century now, a modern Haitian...   More >

How the power of diversity creates better groups, firms, schools, and societies: CITRIS Spring 2018 Research Exchange Series

Seminar | March 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 310 Sutardja Dai Hall

 Vinton G. Cerf, Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist, Google

 CITRIS and the Banatao Institute

Vinton G. Cerf has served as vice president and chief Internet evangelist for Google since October 2005. In this role, he is responsible for identifying new enabling technologies to support the development of advanced, Internet-based products and services from Google. He is also an active public face for Google in the Internet world.

Plant and Microbial Biology Plant Seminar: "Ferredoxin - protein interactions and energy transduction in Photosynthesis"

Seminar | March 7 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Toshiharu Hase, Osaka University

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

Dr. Hase is Professor Emeritus of Osaka University and formerly affiliated to the Institute of Protein Research at Osaka University. His research interests include photosynthetic electron transfer, ferredoxin-dependent redox metabolisms and the structure/function of redox enzymes.

Excess Baggage: How Physicians' and Patients’ Race-Related Beliefs and Attitudes Affect Racially Discordant Clinical Interactions

Colloquium | March 7 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Louis A. Penner, Professor, Wayne State University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

There are pervasive and persistent disparities in the health of Nonhispanic White Americans and most racial ethnic/minorities; the greatest of these are between Black and White Americans. There are multiple, complex reasons for this but disparities in the quality of healthcare received by Black and by White patients is one well-documented cause. One important aspect of healthcare disparities...   More >

Reducing Stress with Breema (BEUHS177)

Workshop | March 7 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | Tang Center, University Health Services, Section Club

 Arlie Mischeaux, The Breema Center; Angela Porter, The Breema Center

 Be Well at Work - Elder Care

This interactive workshop will introduce you to Breema, a body centered meditation/mindfulness practice that creates an experience of relaxation, balance, and harmony. Breema practice supports physical and mental flexibility, as well as mental clarity, vitality, and emotional balance. Participants will engage in various movements, including gentle stretches, rhythmic movements, and...   More >

  Enroll online

Holistic Optimization of Data-Intensive Applications

Seminar | March 7 | 1-2 p.m. | Soda Hall, 430-438 Wozniak Lounge

 Alvin Cheung, Assistant Professor, University of Washington

 Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS)

In this talk, I will show how examining the programming system and the database management system in tandem allows developers to build data-intensive applications and systems that are both performant and correct.

Topology Seminar (Introductory Talk): Background for research talk

Seminar | March 7 | 2-3 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Laura Starkston, Stanford

 Department of Mathematics

We will go over some background related to J-holomorphic curves and complex algebraic singularities in relation to questions discussed in the research talk.

An almost-linear time algorithm for uniform random spanning tree generation

Seminar | March 7 | 3:10-4 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Aaron Schild, U C Berkeley

 Department of Statistics

We give an m^{1+o(1)} beta^{o(1)}-time algorithm for generating uniformly random spanning trees in weighted graphs with max-to-min weight ratio beta. In the process, we illustrate how fundamental tradeoffs in graph partitioning can be overcome by eliminating vertices from a graph using Schur complements of the associated Laplacian matrix.

Our starting point is the Aldous-Broder algorithm,...   More >

Geographies of Activism: Cartographic Memory and Community Practices of Care

Colloquium | March 7 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 575 McCone Hall

 Juan Herrera, University of California Los Angeles

 Department of Geography

Social movements mobilize to make changes in actually existing geographies. But far more than space being just a surface upon which social movements evolve, this presentation posits that social movements take part in the production of space. Drawing from oral histories of 1960s activists from Oakland’s Fruitvale district, I argue that the work of remembering activism is a cartographic process...   More >

Number Theory Seminar: Computation of paramodular forms via lattice methods

Seminar | March 7 | 3:40-5 p.m. | 748 Evans Hall

 Watson Ladd, UC Berkeley

 Department of Mathematics

We know how to calculate spaces of classical modular forms and make large tables, but Siegel modular forms have been much harder to compute. Conditional on Ibukiyama's conjecture, we compute efficiently Euler factors of some (many) paramodular forms via computations with the genus of particular quadratic forms. This is joint work with Gonzalo Tornaria and Jeffrey Hein.

Topology Seminar (Main Talk): Smooth and singular symplectic surfaces

Seminar | March 7 | 4-5 p.m. | 3 Evans Hall

 Laura Starkston, Stanford

 Department of Mathematics

We will discuss some problems and results about symplectic surfaces in 4-manifolds, particularly in the complex projective plane. The main question is to classify symplectic surfaces up to symplectic isotopy. If the surface has singularities, we restrict the isotopies to the class of surfaces with the same model singularities.

Expanding the Chemical Palette for Reliable Adsorption-Based Separations

Colloquium | March 7 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Tan Hall

 David Sholl, Georgia Institute of Technology

 Department of Chemical Engineering

The majority of research literature on chemical separations focuses on a relatively small collection of chemicals. In many ways this is appropriate because of the dramatic economic and environmental impacts of these species. The space of possible chemicals, however is vast; Carl Sagan's famous "billions and billions" is many orders of magnitude too small for chemical space. I will discuss early...   More >

What explains the dramatic rise in autism prevalence (from one in 10,000 to 1 in 68)?: The hunt for environmental factors

Colloquium | March 7 | 4-5:30 p.m. |  2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues)

 Troy Duster

 Emily Diamond, Professor, The Wright Institute

 Institute for the Study of Societal Issues

Autism prevalence and other neurodevelopmental disabilities have markedly risen in the last 2 decades. Researchers around the world are looking for environmental factors. My project - the International Autism Mapping Project - tries to answer this question through geospatial mapping. Specifically, we examine the place of conception, and its nearness to various kinds of toxins. Since autism...   More >

Applied Math Seminar: Modeling electronic transport properties in incommensurate 2D multilayer materials

Seminar | March 7 | 4-5 p.m. | 740 Evans Hall

 Paul Cazeaux, University of Kansas

 Department of Mathematics

The recent discovery of a whole family of two-dimensional crystalline materials such as graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and many others leads to study the properties of their combinations, particularly by stacking a number of layers vertically. Such structures are generally non-periodic, with interesting geometric properties such as moiré effects. We first recall the usual description...   More >

ERG Colloquium: Cynthia Moe-Lobeda: Climate Change as Climate Debt: Forging a Just Future

Colloquium | March 7 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 126 Barrows Hall

 Cynthia Moe-Lobeda, Recent ERG PhD Graduate, Professor of Theological and Social Ethics

 Energy and Resources Group

DESCRIPTION:
Climate change may be the most far reaching manifestation of white privilege and class privilege yet to face humankind. Caused overwhelmingly by high-consuming people, climate change is wreaking death and destruction foremost on impoverished people who also are disproportionately people of color...   More >

Genetically Encoded Tools for Manipulation of Bioenergetics

Seminar | March 7 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 114 Morgan Hall

 Denis Titov, University of California, Berkeley

 Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology

Center for Computational Biology Seminar: Dr. Christina Curtis, Assistant Professor, School of Medicine, Stanford University

Seminar | March 7 | 4:30-5:30 p.m. | 125 Li Ka Shing Center

 Center for Computational Biology

Title: Quantifying the evolutionary dynamics of tumor progression and metastasis

Abstract: Cancer results from the acquisition of somatic alterations in an evolutionary process that typically occurs over many years, much of which is occult. Understanding the evolutionary dynamics that are operative at different stages of progression in individual tumors might inform the earlier detection,...   More >

Science Cafe - Science and Art of Active Transportation Planning

Presentation | March 7 | 7-8:30 p.m. |  Restaurant Valparaiso

 1403 Solano Ave., Albany, CA 94706

 Eric Anderson, College of Environmental Design

 Science@Cal

This science cafe is an informal forum for discussing interesting and relevant scientific issues. We encourage public engagement with science by inviting members of the scientific community to present topics for a casual evening of conversation.

Berkeley is a leading city in promoting walking and biking for transportation. The City recently adopted a new Berkeley Bicycle Plan (2017), laying...   More >

The Art & science of designing safe bike and walkways in Berkeley