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<< Monday, July 29, 2013 >>


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Zero Yen Architect: Kyohei Sakaguchi + MUJI: New Ideas About Architecture and Housing in Economically Tight Times

Lecture | July 29 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall


Kyohei Sakaguchi

Tomizaburo Hagiwara, MUJI

College of Environmental Design, MUJI


Reception at 6 p.m. in the Wurster Hall lobby. Lecture will follow at 6:30 p.m.

Kyohei Sakaguchi

Kyohei Sakaguchi argues that architecture can be built for and by anyone, even those who are the most poor. The March 2011 earthquake in Japan and its aftermath has pushed him further; today, he claims to be the "Prime MInister" of a new Japan, built on new ideals. It's a challenging mix — can one really be anti-establishment and exhibited in major museums?

Sakaguchi was born in 1978 in Kumamoto, Japan. He received a Bachelor of Architecture degree from the School of Science and Engineering at Waseda University (Osamu Ishiyama Laboratory), Japan. Projects include Zero Yen House, 4D Garden, Living in a Watertank, and the House Biker. Formerly based in Tokyo, Sakaguchi's new nation is based at the Zero Center in Kumamoto.

For more information about Kyohei Sakaguchi and his work, see Zero Yen House.

Tomizaburo Hagiwara of MUJI

Tomizaburo Hagiwara’s talk "Rebirth of Community: Making Space for Living" will present MUJI’s latest residential projects, especially House Vision: Furniture House, developed jointly with Shigeru Ban. Although MUJI prefers to challenge consumerism with "brandless" products, it is also known to have designed affordable prefabricated homes with Kengo Kuma and Kazuhiro Namba.

MUJI (Mujirushi Ryouhin / 無印良品) works with leading designers to explore how better design and production practices can contribute to a better environment, resulting in simple, well-designed products, from toothpaste to houses and cars. (Dwell offers more about MUJI’s prefabricated homes, or visit MUJI.net.) New ideas are also solicited through competitions such as the 2013 "Long Lasting Design for Living." Mr. Hagiwara, with MUJI since its beginnings in the late 1980s, is responsible for new projects. Mr. Hagiwara will speak first.

MUJI has recently expanded its retail reach into the Bay area, and is sponsoring this talk.


danab@berkeley.edu