<< Week of February 14 >>

Monday, February 11, 2019

Seismic Performance of Existing Tall Steel Framed Buildings

Lecture | February 11 | 12-1 p.m. | 502 Davis Hall

 Robert Pekelnicky, SE, Principal, Degenkolb Engineers

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

AHMA Colloquium - Structured space, structured time, structured things: making digital research data reusable

Lecture | February 11 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 308A Doe Library

 Adam Rabinowitz, University of Texas at Austin

 Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, Graduate Group in

This paper is part of a larger lecture series entitled "Digital Humanities and the Ancient World." The series is co-sponsored by the Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology (AHMA) Colloquium and the Townsend Center for the Humanities.

Berkeley Lectures in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering presented by The Dow Chemical Company: Traditional Fluid Flow Configurations: Unexpected Responses

Lecture | February 11 | 4-6 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Howard Stone, Professor, Princeton University

 Department of Chemical Engineering

The flows of complex fluids link fundamental research questions to potential applications, both in industry and for understanding natural phenomena. In this talk I discuss two research questions that we have studied recently: (1) Although flows at modest Reynolds numbers at a T-shaped junction is a geometry where one should expect everything is known, nevertheless we uncover previously...   More >

Beyond heteronormativity: Queer archaeology in Japan

Lecture | February 11 | 4-6 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Jun Mitsumoto, Associate Professor of Archaeology and Museum Studies, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, and Center for Research on the Dynamics of Civilizations, Okayama University, Japan

 Archaeological Research Facility, Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Department of Anthropology

This presentation focuses on issues of heteronormativity in Japanese archaeology, using case studies regarding same-sex relationships and cross-dressing in prehistoric and protohistoric Japan to explore how such practical studies can oppose heteronormative interpretations, and what new information and perspectives can be gained through a reconstruction of the past.

Beyond heteronormativity: Queer archaeology in Japan

Lecture | February 11 | 4-6 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Jun Mitsumoto, Associate Professor of Archaeology and Museum Studies, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, and Center for Research on the Dynamics of Civilizations, Okayama University, Japan

 Archaeological Research Facility, Department of Anthropology

This presentation focuses on issues of heteronormativity in Japanese archaeology, using case studies regarding same-sex relationships and cross-dressing in prehistoric and protohistoric Japan to explore how such practical studies can oppose heteronormative interpretations, and what new information and perspectives can be gained through a reconstruction of the past.

Design Field Notes: Karen Nakamura

Lecture | February 11 | 4:30-5:30 p.m. | 220 Jacobs Hall

 Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation

Karen Nakamura is a cultural and visual anthropologist who researches disability in contemporary Japan at the University of California, Berkeley. Her first project was on sign language, identity, and deaf social movements and resulted in a monograph and edited volume. After that, her second project was on schizophrenia and community-based recovery in Japan and this resulted in a book, its...   More >

News of the Future and the Future of News

Lecture | February 11 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Osher Theater, BAMPFA

 Kevin Delaney, Quartz

 Berkeley Center for New Media, Graduate School of Journalism

Kevin J. Delaney is editor in chief and co-CEO of Quartz, the global business news site at qz.com. Kevin cofounded Quartz in 2012 and has led its pioneering approach to journalism, which has won many awards and attracted a readership around the world. Prior to Quartz, Kevin was a Wall Street Journal reporter for a decade, with postings in Paris and San Francisco. He was managing editor of...   More >

News of the Future and the Future of News

Lecture | February 11 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Kevin Delaney

 Berkeley Center for New Media, Graduate School of Journalism

Berkeley Center for New Media

Kevin J. Delaney is editor in chief and co-CEO of Quartz, the global business news site at qz.com. Kevin cofounded Quartz in 2012 and has led its pioneering approach to journalism, which has won many awards and attracted a readership around the world. Prior to Quartz, Kevin was a Wall Street Journal reporter for a decade, with postings in Paris and San Francisco....   More >

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Plants and People Lunchtime Lectures: The Ethnobotany of a Medicinal Moss

Lecture | February 12 | 12-1 p.m. |  UC Botanical Garden

 Botanical Garden

As a part of our "Year of Ethnobotany" celebrations, the Garden will be hosting monthly lunch time lectures featuring the research of UC Berkeley graduate students, post-docs, and faculty.

In February join, Eric Harris to learn all about mosses and their use in human life.

Free with Garden Admission

  Register online or by calling 510-664-7606

Sustainability – Why and How? The Nordic Way

Lecture | February 12 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall

 Ambassador Ove Ullerup, Royal Danish Embassy in Sweden

 Institute of European Studies, Center for Responsible Business, Nordic Studies Program

In his talk, the Danish ambassador to Sweden, Ove Ullerup, will focus on the relationship and cooperation between the public and private sector on the sustainability agenda in the Nordic countries.
The ambassador discusses challenges in changing concepts and how the Nordic countries will face these in the future. What role will the UN Sustainable Development Goals play and have they changed our...   More >

Ove Ullerup

Restraining Great Powers: Soft Balancing From Empires To The Global Era

Lecture | February 12 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 T.V. Paul, McGill University

 Institute of International Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Institute for South Asia Studies

This presentation is based on the book with the same title (Yale University Press, 2018) which examines a crucial element of state behavior -- the use of international institutions, informal alignments and economic instruments such as sanctions -- to constrain the power and threatening behavior of dominant actors. Much of International Relations scholarship fails to capture the use of these...   More >

Sincerity out, Authenticity in: Poetry on the Quest for Trust in the times of Post-Truth

Lecture | February 12 | 5:30-7 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Stanislav Lvovsky, Auhtor

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

Back then in the first half of 1990s new generation of Russian poets, — or its considerable part — found itself facing the challenge of inventing a new way to speak straightforwardly: readily available poetics either weren’t quite fit for the job or themselves were part of the problem to be resolved. Poetry optics, which has emerged at the time in the capacity of the solution, was the “new...   More >

Discovery and Diversity: Critical Factors in Tomorrow's Health Care: Dean of the Stanford School of Medicine Lloyd B. Minor

Lecture | February 12 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 125 Morrison Hall

 Lloyd B. Minor, Stanford University School of Medicine

 The Berkeley Forum

How are medical schools adapting to today's greatest challenges? Join the Dean of Stanford University School of Medicine, Lloyd B. Minor M.D., for a discussion on the ways in which medical education is changing and responding to unique social demands. Dean Minor will specifically discuss the challenges in biomedical discovery and the vital importance of diversity in science, while showcasing how...   More >

$0

  Buy tickets online

Food Politics 2019: Nutrition Science Under Siege with Marion Nestle

Lecture | February 12 | 6-8 p.m. | North Gate Hall, Logan Multimedia Center (Room 142)

 Graduate School of Journalism, Berkeley Food Institute, UC Berkeley-11th Hour Food and Farming Journalism Fellowship

Please join us for a special lecture series with celebrated author and scholar Marion Nestle. "Food Politics 2019: Nutrition Science Under Siege." Nutrition science is under attack from statisticians and the food industry. Who stands to gain and what might be lost?

  RSVP online

Photo: Bill Hayes

Surprising Evidence:: Revealing Vanished Landscapes Through Nontraditional Moving Images

Lecture | February 12 | 6:30-8 p.m. | Wurster Hall, Wurster Auditorium, RM 112

 Rick Prelinger, University of California, Santa Cruz

 Environmental Design Archives

Join us for our second Gallery Talk!

Tuesday, February 12, 2019
Wurster Auditorium, Room 112

6:30 to 7pm - Light Refreshments
7 to 8pm - Lecture

Free to UC Berkeley Students, Staff, Faculty, and Friends of the EDA

Suggested $10 donation for those outside UC Berkeley


Historians, architects and planners often look to feature films as records of extinct environments. But few know...   More >

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

“Bringing the War Home”: Visual Aftermaths and Domestic Disturbances in the Era of Modern Warfare

Lecture | February 13 | 12-2 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Caren Kaplan, Professor of American Studies, University of California, Davis

 Department of Gender and Women's Studies

At the close of the First Gulf War, feminist architectural historian Beatriz Colomina wrote that “war today speaks about the difficulty of establishing the limits of domestic space.” That conflict of 1990-91 is most often cited as the first to pull the waging of war fully into the digital age and therefore into a blurring of boundaries of all kinds.

The Exeter Anthology: Codicological Grace and Integrative Poetics

Lecture | February 13 | 12 p.m. | 306 Wheeler Hall

 John Niles, Professor Emeritus, UC Berkeley

 Department of English

A brown-bag presentation by John Niles on his most recent book *God's Exiles and English Verse: On the Exeter Anthology of Old English Poetry.*

HearstCAVE: Immersive Visualization and Student Discovery Experiences

Lecture | February 13 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Chris Hoffman, Associate Director, Research IT

 Archaeological Research Facility

This talk explores the role that visualization walls, photogrammetry, and virtual reality can play in research, scholarship, and student engagement, highlighting a series of projects led by Research IT and the Hearst Museum of Anthropology with a growing set of partners on campus and beyond.

Reimagining Labor Law

Lecture | February 13 | 12:30-1:30 p.m. |  Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse

 2020 Addison St, Berkeley, CA 94704

 Catherine Fisk, Berkeley Law

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

Transformation of work through the gig economy and through the decline of unions presents unprecedented challenges for regulating work for the common good. But it also presents opportunities for a fresh start. This lecture will examine some of the recent radical changes in the law of the workplace in California and nationwide.

Berkeley Lectures in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering presented by The Dow Chemical Company: Seeking Intersections Between Disciplines: “Boundaries” in Multiphase Flows

Lecture | February 13 | 4-6 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium

 Howard Stone, Professor, Princeton University

 Department of Chemical Engineering

Fluid dynamics is a discipline with a long history, and has a distinctive feature that it links engineering, mathematics and physics, and provides many avenues for intersections with biology. In this talk I will provide one view of the ways that mechanics, and in particular fluid dynamics, yields insights into a wide variety of "multiphase" flow problems. The talk will begin with brief examples...   More >

Howison Lectures in Philosophy Presented by Philip Kitcher: Progress in the Sciences and in the Arts

Lecture | February 13 | 4:10 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Philip Kitcher, John Dewey Professor of Philosophy, Columbia University

 Graduate Division

Philip Kitcher will present the Howison Lecture on February 13, 2019. The lecture is titled "Progress in the Sciences and in the Arts," and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Total Medicine: An Approach to the Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Medical Texts

Lecture | February 13 | 5 p.m. | 300 Wheeler Hall

 John Niles, Professor Emeritus, Berkeley English

 Medieval Studies Program

When we enter the realm of Anglo-Saxon medicine we find ourselves in a landscape of total war, with all the curative plants of the earth and all beneficent animal extracts aligned with the physician, angels, archangels, and the almighty God against the attacks of wyrms, elves, witches, and flying venoms. We are also in a pre-Scholastic environment of experimental science where the curative...   More >

Reetika Khera | Dissent on Aadhaar: Big Data Meets Big Brother

Lecture | February 13 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conference Room)

 Reetika Khera, Associate Professor, Economics and Public Systems Group, the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad

 Lawrence Cohen, Professor in Anthropology and South and Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies

A talk by Walter Hakala, Associate Professor in the Asian Studies Program and Department of English at the University at Buffalo, SUNY, and author of Negotiating Languages: Urdu, Hindi, and the Definition of Modern South Asia, published by Columbia University Press.

Docent Lecture: Berkeley Rep's "Paradise Square"

Lecture | February 13 | 5-5:45 p.m. | 330 Wheeler Hall

 Dee Kursh, Berkeley Repertory Theatre

 Berkeley Repertory Theatre

Come hear more about Berkeley Repertory Theatre's new musical, "Paradise Square: A New Musical."

It’s 1863 and in a 20-block area of Manhattan known as the Five Points, Black and Irish Americans live side by side, work together, marry, and for a brief period realize racial harmony. However, the intensifying Civil War soon results in the first-ever Federal draft, leading to riots as whites are...   More >

JOINT ARCHITECTURE + AIA EAST BAY LECTURE: ALICE KIMM | JOHN FRIEDMAN ALICE KIMM ARCHITECTS

Lecture | February 13 | 7:30-9 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall

 College of Environmental Design

WED, FEB 13, 7:30pm. Please join us for a talk with the co-founder and principal of JFAK, an internationally recognized firm based in Los Angeles. Co-sponsored by AIA East Bay. Open to all!

Thursday, February 14, 2019

The Undefeated Heart: Buddhism and Performance and Practice with Joe Goode

Lecture | February 14 | 12-1:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Joe Goode

 Arts + Design

Joe Goode will talk about how Buddhist philosophy has changed his working process from a preordained “vision” process to one of discovery. Goode is Artistic Director of Joe Goode Performance Group with whom he has performed in the U.S., Canada, Africa, South America, and the Middle East. His performance installations have been commissioned by the Krannert Art Museum, the M. H. DeYoung Museum,...   More >

The Globotics Upheaval: Globalization, Robotics, and the Future of Work

Lecture | February 14 | 3-4:30 p.m. | Haas School of Business, Spieker Forum, Chou Hall

 Richard Baldwin, Graduate Institute, Geneva

 Clausen Center for International Business and Policy

Automation and robotics are changing our lives quickly - everyone knows that. But digital disruption goes much further. In The Globotics Upheaval, Richard Baldwin, one of the world's leading globalisation experts, explains that exponential growth in computing, transmission and storage capacities is also creating a new form of "virtual" globalisation that could undermine the foundations of...   More >

Undocumented Lives: The Untold Story of Mexican Migration

Lecture | February 14 | 4 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Ana Raquel Minian

 Center for Latin American Studies

In this talk, Professor Minian explores circular migration, which reshaped communities in the United States and Mexico, and shares stories of Mexicans who have been used and abused by economic and political policies of both countries.
Ana Raquel Minian is Assistant Professor of History and of Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity at Stanford University.

A migrant farm worker in Virginia who returns to Mexico every year on a H2A visa. (Photo by Laura Elizabeth Pohl/Bread for the World.)

Optimization for Machine Learning

Lecture | February 14 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 210 South Hall

 Yifan Sun

 Information, School of

How good data models facilitate optimization and generalization in machine learning.

Modernism in Wartime: Avant-Gardes, Revolutions, Poetries

Lecture | February 14 | 5-7 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 315, Maude Fife

 Vincent Sherry, Howard Nemerov Professor of the Humanities, Washington University in St.Louis

 C. D. Blanton, Associate Professor, UC Berkeley Department of English; Catherine Flynn, Associate Professor, UC Berkeley Department of English; Donna Jones, Associate Professor, UC Berkeley Department of English

 Department of English, Institute of European Studies, Townsend Center for the Humanities

Vincent Sherry will speak about the experience of the First World War from the vantage of an international avant-garde, considering the alternate temporalities of the radical time of the prewar avant-garde event and the long and lengthening durée of the conflict. How does an avant-garde poetry respond to this difference, and what is the longer story of revolution it tells?

Farm and Field: Sather Lecture Series: A Bronze Age Greek State in Formation

Lecture | February 14 | 5:30 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Jack L. Davis, Blegen Professor of Greek Archaeology, University of Cincinnati

 Department of Classics

Internationally recognized scholar of Bronze Age Greece offers a series of lectures showing how the archaeological record sheds light on culture and communal life of early Greece.

Friday, February 15, 2019

Outsiders: The History of Refugees in an Enlarged Europe

Lecture | February 15 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Philipp Ther, Professor of Central European History, University of Vienna

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

Refugees have permeated European history and the receiving states and societies have almost always profited from taking them in. This talk analyzes the major causes of mass flight and the oft traumatic journeys en route. Tracing the paths of the refugees, the narrative crosses the Mediterranean and the Atlantic, and so provides a wider vision of European history that includes the United States....   More >

The key legal concepts that engineers face in environmental site remediation

Lecture | February 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 534 Davis Hall

 Dr. Morgan Gilhuly, Environmental attorney at Barg Coffin

 Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

There's the Rub: Making Art and Scholarship Bang: A Conversation between Xandra Ibarra and Juana María Rodríguez

Lecture | February 15 | 12-2 p.m. |  Durham Studio Theater (Dwinelle Hall)

 Xandra Ibarra; Juana María Rodríguez

 Center for the Study of Sexual Culture

Join us for a presentation of work by artist Xandra Ibarra and a dialogue between Ibarra and Professor Juana María Rodríguez about the nexus of art, performance and scholarship.

CANCELED Walter Hakala | Vernacular Literacy and the Urdu Public Text: Examples from Gujarat and the Deccan

Lecture | February 15 | 2-4 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conference Room) | Canceled

 Walter Hakala, Associate Professor, Asian Studies Program, Department of English, University at Buffalo, SUNY

 Gregory Maxwell Bruce, Lecturer in Urdu, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

 Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Urdu Initiative

A talk by Walter Hakala, Associate Professor in the Asian Studies Program and Department of English at the University at Buffalo, SUNY, and author of Negotiating Languages: Urdu, Hindi, and the Definition of Modern South Asia, published by Columbia University Press.

Can Social Media Be Used As a Teaching Tool?: A Conversation With Pierre Lévy on Twitter

Lecture | February 15 | 2:30-3:30 p.m. | B-4 Dwinelle Hall

 Ana Elisa S. C. S. Ferreira, Visiting Scholar, Berkeley Language Center

 Berkeley Language Center

In Spring 2018, Ana Elisa S. C. S. Ferreira coordinated a project called #askplevy at Instituto Federal Campus Cubatão (Brazil). During 3 months, professors, students, and staff used Twitter to post questions about education and technology to professor and author Pierre Lévy.

Mapping Race, Gendering Place: African American Roots Tourism in Bahia, Brazil

Lecture | February 15 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall

 Patricia Pinho

 Center for Latin American Studies

This talk will examine the major intersecting tropes that inform African American roots tourism in Brazil and demonstrate how the gendering of space, place, and time are tied to the geopolitics of the black diaspora.

Patricia de Santana Pinho is Associate Professor of Latin American and Latino Studies at UC Santa Cruz

(Mapping Diaspora: African American Roots Tourism in Brazil. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.)

Saturday, February 16, 2019

Science at Cal Lecture - Is anybody out there?

Lecture | February 16 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 131 Campbell Hall

 Dan Werthimer, Berkeley SETI Research Center

 Science@Cal

Are Fast Radio Bursts signals from ET? Or are they signals from magnetars? Is `Oumuamua an alien space ship? Or is it a rock from another solar system? Are we alone in the universe? Current and future SETI projects may provide an answer.Berkeley SETI Research Center chief scientist Dan Werthimer will describe the rationale for past and future searches and will show how new technologies are...   More >