<< Saturday, January 25, 2020 >>

Saturday, January 25, 2020

Fritz Lang’s Indian Epic, Part I: The Tiger of Eschnapur

Film - Feature | January 25 | 1 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Institute for South Asia Studies

A man-eating tiger, an entrancing temple dancer, a menacing maharajah: such are the thrills and perils encountered by a German architect in India in Fritz Lang’s two-part epic The Tiger of Eschnapur and The Indian Tomb. After decades of exile in Hollywood, Lang returned to Germany in 1958 to direct the films, working from a script that he and Thea von Harbou had originally developed in 1920. The...   More >

Fritz Lang’s Indian Epic, Part II: The Indian Tomb

Film - Feature | January 25 | 3:15 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Institute for South Asia Studies

In the second half of Lang’s two-part epic, our German hero tries to escape with his beloved, the temple dancer Seetha, but is captured and imprisoned in a dungeon. Meanwhile, a palace rebellion threatens to depose the maharajah. The film reaches a pinnacle of exoticism with Debra Paget’s eye-popping, censor-defying “snake dance.”

The Paper Will Be Blue

Film - Feature | January 25 | 5:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

A clueless tank crew wanders Bucharest’s chaotic streets during one epoch-changing night in Radu Muntean’s humanistic portrait of people who aren’t concerned with making history, just trying to live through it. It’s the night of December 22, 1989, now famous as the date when dictator Nicolae Ceauşescu’s regime finally toppled: madness, paranoia, and revolution are in the air, but the young...   More >

I vitelloni

Film - Feature | January 25 | 7:30 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

I vitelloni is sufficiently rooted in neorealism to convey an authentic sense of environment, yet touched with the ether of memory in its evocation of youthful boredom and rootlessness in Rimini, the provincial town where Fellini grew up. The vitelloni are the not-so-young sons of the middle class, perpetually unemployed mother’s pets whittling their lives away in childish pursuits. (“They shine...   More >