<< Wednesday, April 17, 2019 >>

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

The Power of Plurality: Encounters, Emergence, and Boundary-Making in the Nineteenth-Century Industrial Far West

Lecture | April 17 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 David Hyde, Department of Anthropology

 Archaeological Research Facility

This talk situates industrial sites in the post-Gold Rush American West as dynamic, pluralistic spaces of encounter, negotiation, entanglement, and emergence- sites of creativity and community building (as much as control and exploitation) that re-configured boundaries of difference along multiple axes in important and lasting ways.

Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat with Timothy Hampton: Bob Dylan's Poetics: How the Songs Work

Lecture | April 17 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Hampton’s close examination of Bob Dylan's songs locates the artist’s transgressive style within a long history of modern (and modernist) art.

Through the Window: People, Data, Technology, and National Security

Lecture | April 17 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Dr. Andrew L. Brooks, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

 Data Sciences

The U.S. intelligence community faces an increasingly complex and evolving national security landscape.

In this talk, Dr. Andrew L. Brooks, the Chief Data Scientist at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, details how his organization is navigating this landscape through efforts focused on people, data, and technology.

Through the Window: People, Data, Technology, and National Security

Lecture | April 17 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 202 South Hall

 Dr. Andrew L. Brooks

 Information, School of

Dr. Andrew L. Brooks is the Chief Data Scientist at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

Visual bilingualism and the funerary space: Keys to understanding the spatial semiotics of Central Asian tombs in 6th century China

Lecture | April 17 | 5-7 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 Pénélope Riboud, Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

The dominant religion of pre-Islamic Sogdiana was a local form of Zoroastrianism, and this has led most scholars to assume a correlation with the religious beliefs and practices within the Sogdian community settled in China. And indeed, many aspects of these tombs show that Central Asian funerary practices were maintained. However, some aspects of “Sino-Sogdian” tombs, such as the treatment of...   More >

The Great Chernobyl Acceleration

Lecture | April 17 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall

 Kate Brown, Professor of History in the Science, Technology and Society Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)

In April 1986, the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant exploded and sent upwards of 50 million curies into the surrounding environment. Brown argues that to call this event an “accident” is to sweep aside radioactive incidents in the region that occurred before and after the accident. In the 1960s, Soviet researchers learned that the people living in the Pripyat Marshes surrounding the Chernobyl Plant...   More >

Fact, Fiction, and Film: Turning History into Narrative: with Hallie Rubenhold

Lecture | April 17 | 6 p.m. | Wheeler Hall, 330, Berkeley English Lounge

 Hallie Rubenhold, Author | Broadcaster | Historical Consultant

 Department of English

Hallie Rubenhold is a bestselling author, social historian, broadcaster and historical consultant for TV and film. Her most recent book, The Five is the first biography of the five victims of Jack the Ripper and reclaims the narrative in favour of the women, rather than the murderer. In addition to The Five, Hallie is the author of two works of non-fiction, including; The Covent Garden Ladies,...   More >