<< Wednesday, December 04, 2019 >>

Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Townsend Book Chat with Grace Lavery: Quaint, Exquisite: Victorian Aesthetics and the Idea of Japan

Lecture | December 4 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Lavery examines the contradictory role — as both rival empire and cradle of exquisite beauty — played by Japan in the Victorian imagination.

Insistent Things: What Artifacts have to Say about Buffalo Soldiers’ Campaign for Citizenship Rights

Lecture | December 4 | 12:10-1 p.m. | 101 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility)

 Laurie A. Wilkie, Professor, Anthropology, UC Berkeley

 Archaeological Research Facility

This paper will examine the ways that Black regulars serving in the frontier military used personal and company-owned artifacts to participate in national discourses on masculinity, citizenship and being human.

Directing molecular behavior in solution and at solid-liquid interfaces: Eastman Lecturer

Lecture | December 4 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Tan Hall

 Susannah Scott, University of California Santa Barbara

 Department of Chemical Engineering

Heterogeneous catalyst design is often hampered by a lack of precise information about the molecular identity of the active sites. Synthesizing model catalysts with control of the local structure allows us to interrogate the active sites about their interactions with reactants and products.

Archipelagic Vietnam: Rethinking Nationalism and Trans-Pacific Regionalism at the Shoreline

Lecture | December 4 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library

 David Biggs, Professor of History, UC Riverside

 Center for Southeast Asia Studies

Until recent conflicts over the South China Sea, Vietnam’s history has been almost wholly described in terrestrial terms. Seaborne connections across the East Sea and the Pacific have however played key roles in defining modern Vietnam. This talk reimagines Vietnam as an archipelago, a more permeable nation-system of nodes linked by flows of energy, food, people and technology.

David Biggs

First Step(pe)s: The Silk Road from a Steppe Perspective

Lecture | December 4 | 5-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall

 Ursula B. Brosseder, Bonn University

 Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

Numerous, far-reaching migrations and contacts have taken place during prehistory across the vast Eurasian steppes, reaching from Eastern Europe or the Near East to Inner Asia and present-day China. However, the intensity and speed of connectivity between East and West changed profoundly in the late first millennium BC. Traditional narrative holds that this change was initiated by the travels of...   More >