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Friday, November 9, 2018

How We Fight Surveillance Capitalism

Special Event | November 9 | 12:10-2 p.m. | 202 South Hall | Canceled


Shoshana Zuboff

Information, School of


Workshop with Professor Shoshana Zuboff



Designs of Destruction: The Making of Monuments in the 20th Century

Lecture | November 9 | 12:30-2 p.m. | 104 Wurster Hall


Lucia Allais, University of Princeton

Center for New Media


Between 1943 and 1945, the Allied Air Forces produced aerial photographs of 79 Italian cities, annotated them with the location of monuments, and appended them with elaborate instructions for aerial bombers on “how to miss cultural sites.” Similar lists and maps of monuments were produced by the Allies for almost every country in Europe, alternatively expanding and shrinking to fit various phases...   More >


All Audiences

All Audiences



Workshop: Living Landscapes: Time, Knowledge, and Ecology

Workshop | November 9 | 1-5 p.m. | 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility), Room 101


Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Archaeological Research Facility, Department of Anthropology, Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Art and Cultures (SISJAC), Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN)


November 9 (Fri.): 1-5PM: Rm 101, 2251 College Building (Archaeological Research Facility), UC Berkeley

November 10 (Sat.): 9AM-12 noon: Rm 221, Kroeber Hall, UC Berkeley (closed session; please RSVP: habu@berkeley.edu)


How can knowledge of the past be developed and transformed so that it informs understandings of the present and future? The Center for Japanese Studies at UC...   More >


The Saturday, November 10 portion of the workshop is a closed session. To request attendance, please email Professor Junko Habu at habu@berkeley.edu.



Data in the Higher Education Curriculum

Seminar | November 9 | 3:10-5 p.m. | 107 South Hall


Cathryn Carson

Information, School of


Undergraduate institutions nationally and internationally are increasingly grappling with how to provide data analytic competencies to their students. This talk offers three lines of sight into this development, reflecting on drivers internationally (looking at the case of a recent German national initiative), nationally (taking a synoptic look at recent U.S. efforts), and at UC Berkeley.



China's "Law and Development" Moment?: Reflecting on Reflections of Law in China’s Globalism

Colloquium | November 9 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library


Matthew S. Erie, Oriental Studies, University of Oxford

Stanley Lubman, Boalt School of Law, UC Berkeley

Center for Chinese Studies (CCS), Law, Boalt School of


What is the role of law in China’s new globalism? By the year 2020, China will be one of the largest capital exporters in the world, marking the first time in modern history a nondemocratic state will have such a widespread impact on the developing world. While much of Chinese investment flows to post-industrial Europe and North America, a significant amount reaches Sub-Saharan Africa, West Asia,...   More >



ZenIT: Mindful Work through Zen Meditation and Collaboration

Lecture | November 9 | 4-5 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall


Amil Khanzada, ZenIT

Center for Japanese Studies (CJS)


CS alumnus Amil Khanzada, now Evolution Ambassador of Eiheiji Town in Japan, will talk about ZenIT, a new movement to define a style of working that is highly productive *and* peaceful, by combining Japanese Soto Zen meditation and Silicon Valley software development pairing/collaboration principles.



Zama

Film - Feature | November 9 | 4-5:45 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Adapted from the 1956 novel by Argentine writer Antonio di Benedetto, Zama is a Buñuelian glimpse into a colonial abyss via the mind and body of Don Diego de Zama. An officer of the Spanish crown stationed at a remote proto-Paraguayan outpost, Zama exists in perpetual anticipation of his transfer home. Martel describes Zama as a “man trapped in who he thinks he is,” and over the course of the...   More >



Shaping a 21st Century Workforce – Is AI Friend or Foe?: Barbara Weinstock Lectures on the Morals of Trade by Jennifer Granholm

Lecture | November 9 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium


Jennifer Granholm, Former Governor of Michigan

Graduate Division


Jennifer Granholm will present the Weinstock lecture on November 9, 2018. Her lecture is titled "Shaping a 21st Century Workforce – Is AI Friend or Foe?" The lecture is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.


All Audiences

All Audiences



Concerto Auditions

Performing Arts - Music | November 9 | 5 p.m. |  Hertz Concert Hall


Department of Music


Students audition for a chance to solo with the UC Berkeley Symphony Orchestra in Spring 2019.

Free and open to the public



Raghuram Rajan | Is India Ready for the Twenty First Century?: The 2nd Bhattacharya Lecture on the "Future of India"

Lecture | November 9 | 6-8 p.m. |  Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center | Note change in location


Raghuram Rajan, Professor of Finance at Chicago Booth and the former Governor of the Reserve Bank of India

Pranab Bardhan, Professor of Graduate School, Department of Economics, University of California, Berkeley.

Institute for South Asia Studies, The Bhattacharya India Fund at UC Berkeley


Raghuram Rajan delivers the 2nd lecture in this newly established lecture series on the Future of India.



After Effects: Professor Rajagopalan Mrinalini

Conference/Symposium | November 9 | 6-8 p.m. |  Wurster Hall


Professor Rajagopalan Mrinalin, Assoc Prof, Department of Art/Architecture History, University of Pittsburgh

Department of Architecture


Professor Rajagopalan Mrinalini will deliver the opening lecture for a graduate student conference entitled: After Effects: Architectural Histories of the Present, November 9th-11th 2018.



Police, Adjective

Film - Feature | November 9 | 7-8:45 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


The language of law, as witnessed and experienced by police, supervisors, and “criminals,” is dissected in this extraordinary work. Cristi is a decent beat cop tailing a clueless, unthreatening teenager around town and has plenty of time to ponder why his supervisors are unleashing the full weight of the law against an ordinary teen. The film’s first half, shot on the streets of contemporary...   More >



TARTUFFE: a modern take on Molière’s classic comedy, Nov. 9-18: Translated into English verse by Richard Wilbur

Performing Arts - Theater | November 9 – 10, 2018 every day | 8-9:30 p.m. |  Zellerbach Playhouse


Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies


Initially censored following its premiere in 1664, TARTUFFE is a bold work that is decidedly relevant today. Set in present-day Los Angeles, TARTUFFE is the story of a con man disguised as a pious spiritual leader who wheedles his way into the home of a gullible, affluent patriarch in the midst of a mid-life crisis — promptly setting the household topsy turvy!


All Audiences

$13 Students & Seniors, Cal Staff & Faculty: online in advance, $15 Students & Seniors, Cal Staff & Faculty: at the door (ID required), $18 General Admission: $18 online in advance, $20 General Admission: at the door

Buy tickets online.

Saturday, November 10, 2018

Workshop: Living Landscapes: Time, Knowledge, and Ecology

Workshop | November 10 | 9 a.m.-12 p.m. | Kroeber Hall, Room 221 (Gifford Room)


Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Archaeological Research Facility, Department of Anthropology, Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Art and Cultures (SISJAC), http://www.chikyu.ac.jp/rihn_e/


November 9 (Fri.): 1-5PM: Rm 101, 2251 College Building (Archaeological Research Facility), UC Berkeley

November 10 (Sat.): 9AM-12 noon: Rm 221, Kroeber Hall, UC Berkeley (closed session; please RSVP: habu@berkeley.edu)


How can knowledge of the past be developed and transformed so that it informs understandings of the present and future? The Center for Japanese Studies at UC...   More >


The Saturday, November 10 portion of the workshop is a closed session. To request attendance, please email Professor Junko Habu at habu@berkeley.edu.

RSVP by emailing habu@berkeley.edu.



Julia Robinson Mathematics Festival at Berkeley

Special Event | November 10 | 9:30 a.m.-12 p.m. |  International House


College of Letters & Science


Loads of hands-on math activities including games, and puzzles!

Students in Grades 6-10 are invited to join in a festival of creative and collaborative mathematics at the International House at 2299 Piedmont Ave. This festival is in partnership with JRMF.org. During the festival, participants will work on various mathematical activities, including puzzles, games, and problems, facilitated by...   More >


All Audiences

All Audiences

Activities are specifically catered to Students in Grades 6-10.

$10 Standard Ticket, $0 Scholarship Ticket

Register online.



After Effects: Architectural Histories of the Present

Conference/Symposium | November 10 | 10 a.m.-5 p.m. |  Wurster Hall


Professor Lucia Allais, Princeton School of Architecture; Professor Rajagopalan Mrinalini, University of Pittsburgh

Department of Architecture


The Department of Architecture at UC Berkeley and its PhD students will host a graduate student conference focusing on the after effects of under examined or minor landscapes, projects and historical developments that are informed by the politics of the present.



Family Workshop: Moche Inspired Face Rattles

Workshop | November 10 | 11 a.m.-2 p.m. |  Hearst Museum of Anthropology | Note change in date


Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology


Join in on this month's Family Workshop at the Hearst Museum! Learn about Moche culture and create rattles inspired by two thousand year old objects.This is a drop-in workshop for all ages. Bring the whole family for this activity included free with museum admission.

Find out more about events at the Hearst Museum by going to hearstmuseum.berkeley.edu/events.

Photo: 4-2964


Children



NaNoWriMo 2018: Come Write In at Doe Library

Special Event | November 10 | 1-4 p.m. | Doe Library, Room 180 Doe


Library


NaNoWriMo is back at UC Berkeley’s Doe Library!

Have you ever thought about writing a novel but just didn’t think you had the time? You’re not alone. A small group of friends from the East Bay dared themselves to finish their novels in 30 days back in 1999, creating the foundation of what has become National Novel Writing Month. Since then, this small nonprofit, NaNoWriMo, has inspired a...   More >


All Audiences

The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible, barrier-free settings. If you think you may require disability-related accommodations, please contact Shannon Monroe at least two weeks prior to the event at smonroe@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6151.



2001: A Space Odyssey

Film - Feature | November 10 | 2-4:40 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Stanley Kubrick’s cinematic milestone was in every sense an experimental film, harnessing the widescreen, epic format for an intensely metaphysical, ultimately very personal use. 2001 was conceived less as a science fiction narrative than as an experience in space and time. As a re-creation of the dimensions of outer space—taking us beyond deep focus into infinite focus—it has never been matched....   More >



Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra (West Coast Debut)

Performing Arts - Music | November 10 | 3-5 p.m. |  Zellerbach Hall


Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, Cal Performances

Cal Performances


Program:
R. Strauss/Don Quixote, Op. 35
Tchaikovsky/Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op. 64

Nearly 20 years ago, Israeli conductor Daniel Barenboim and Palestinian scholar Edward Said founded this orchestra of Israelis and Arabs as a model for cooperation across the brutal divides of the Middle East. In doing so, they hoped to replace ignorance with education, knowledge, and understanding; to...   More >


All Audiences

All Audiences

$50-275 (prices subject to change)

Tickets go on sale August 7. Buy tickets online, or by calling 5106429988, or by emailing tickets@calperformances.org.



After Effects: Professor Lucia Allais

Conference/Symposium | November 10 | 4-6 p.m. |  Wurster Hall


Professor Lucia Allais, Princeton School of Architecture

Department of Architecture


Professor Lucia Allais will deliver the closing lecture for a graduate student conference entitled: After Effects: Architectural Histories of the Present, November 9th-11th 2018.



12:08 East of Bucharest

Film - Feature | November 10 | 5:30-7 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


“What’s all the fuss about the revolution? No one cares anymore,” says a young trophy mistress during the sixteenth anniversary of the Romanian revolution. Preparing for another year of getting older, drunker, and lonelier, the bickering threesome of a retiree, a teacher, and a television host pose a related question on the host’s show: Did a true revolution take place in their town, or did...   More >



TARTUFFE: a modern take on Molière’s classic comedy, Nov. 9-18: Translated into English verse by Richard Wilbur

Performing Arts - Theater | November 9 – 10, 2018 every day | 8-9:30 p.m. |  Zellerbach Playhouse


Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies


Initially censored following its premiere in 1664, TARTUFFE is a bold work that is decidedly relevant today. Set in present-day Los Angeles, TARTUFFE is the story of a con man disguised as a pious spiritual leader who wheedles his way into the home of a gullible, affluent patriarch in the midst of a mid-life crisis — promptly setting the household topsy turvy!


All Audiences

$13 Students & Seniors, Cal Staff & Faculty: online in advance, $15 Students & Seniors, Cal Staff & Faculty: at the door (ID required), $18 General Admission: $18 online in advance, $20 General Admission: at the door

Buy tickets online.



Senso

Film - Feature | November 10 | 8-10 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Visconti’s first costume drama abandons his earlier neorealist style for a lush, near-operatic account of love and betrayal during the 1860s Italian resistance to Austrian rule. The film’s masterful opening sequence introduces its themes: patriotism and doomed love, mirrored to a swooning aria, as a performance of a Verdi opera triggers the audience to chant anti-Austrian slogans, and brings...   More >



Javanese Gamelan Music

Performing Arts - Music | November 10 | 8 p.m. |  Hertz Concert Hall


Department of Music


Midiyanto and Ben Brinner, directors
Gamelan Sari Raras, UC Berkeley Javanese ensemble, recently returned from concerts in Indonesia, will perform music and dance of Central Java


All Audiences

All Audiences

$16 General Admission, $12 non-UCB students, seniors, current/retired UCB faculty and staff, groups 10+, $5 UCB students

Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-9988, or by emailing tickets@calperformances.org.

Sunday, November 11, 2018

Chamber Orchestra Concert

Performing Arts - Music | November 11 | 3 p.m. |  Hertz Concert Hall


Department of Music


Tchaikovsky - Romeo and Juliet Overture-Fantasy
Wagner - Siegfried Idyll
Jennifer Huang, conductor

Mozart - Symphony No. 39
Kyle Ko, Grady Lai, conductors

free



Infinite Football

Film - Feature | November 11 | 3:30-4:40 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Perhaps the purest expression of one of Porumboiu’s favorite themes, rules vs. freedom, Infinite Football documents an unassuming bureaucrat with a unique extracurricular passion. Inspired by a life-changing injury he suffered playing soccer as a teen, Laurentiu Ginghină embarked on a quixotic quest to improve the game. Variety’s Jessica Kiang observes, “His endlessly evolving ideas for...   More >



The Cow

Film - Feature | November 11 | 7-8:40 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


“The first Iranian film to deal with the small-scale, the unredeemed, and the unheroic” (Hamidreza Sadr). An extraordinary film marking the beginning of the Iranian New Wave, The Cow is a portrait of village life where isolation and the most extreme poverty create their own abiding social structure. The story moves from tragedy to absurdity without a wink of the eye: this is the thoroughly...   More >

Monday, November 12, 2018

Tana Quartet

Colloquium | November 12 |  Hertz Concert Hall


Department of Music


TIME TBA

Tana invented the quartet of the twenty first century. The are audacious, pioneers and precursors. Tana foresee the new sounds of the modern string quartet.



Recognized by The Guardian as "impeccable players", the quartet is a recipient of an array of international awards, from the Pro Quartet - CEMC Foundation in Paris, the Verbier Festival Academy and the Union of Belgian...   More >

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Earth Writing: ISAS Faculty Workshop led by Prof. Sharad Chari

Workshop | November 13 | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)


Lenore Manderson, Public Health and Medical Anthropology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; Sumathi Ramaswamy, James B. Duke Professor of History and International Comparative Studies, Duke University; Amita Baviskar, Sociology, Institute of Economic Growth, New Delhi; Kath Weston, Anthropology, University of Virginia; Geeta Patel, Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Virginia

Sharad Chari, Geography, UC Berkeley

Institute for South Asia Studies, Sarah Kailath Chair of India Studies, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Department of Geography, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, Alan Dundes Distinguished Chair in Folklore


In our time of unprecedented instrumentalization and transformation of earthly and worldly processes, from the scale of the body to the planet, the Earth-Writing Symposium returns to the question of ‘geography’ as the praxis of ‘Earth-writing.’ Attention to the ‘graphia’ in ‘geography’ points us to a variety of forms of writing or inscription with, through or alongside material, earthly or...   More >



Industry-UCB-UEC Workshop 2018 (IUUWS 2018)

Conference/Symposium | November 13 | 10 a.m.-5:40 p.m. | 3110 Etcheverry Hall


Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Department of Mechanical Engineering (ME)


Workshop Day 1: November 13 (Tues)

10:00 -10:30 Registration

10:30 -10:35 Opening Address:
Prof. Kazuo UCHIDA, Executive Committee Chairman of IUUWS
Department of Computer and Network Engineering, Graduate School of Informatics and Engineering, UEC

10:35 -10:45 Welcome Speech:
Prof. Masayoshi TOMIZUKA
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Associate Dean of...   More >



Historiography and Migration: Explaining the Present through the Lens of History

Lecture | November 13 | 12-1 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Paul Voerkel

Institute of European Studies


Discussions about migration have dominated the public discourse in Germany since the “refugee crisis” of 2015. There is a growing acceptance of empiric data on migration, collected by research institutions like the IMIS at Osnabrück University. On the other hand, the public discourse – including from the government – is getting more emotional and often denies proven facts and figures.
After a...   More >



GUH Lecture: Neutralizing Poverty: Governing Homelessness in San Francisco

Colloquium | November 13 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 170 Wurster Hall


College of Environmental Design


Since the 1980s anti-homeless laws criminalizing sleeping, sitting, and panhandling in public spaces have increased across the US and abroad, with the most rapid rise occurring in the past decade.  While legal studies have tracked the spread of these...    More >



Precarious Inclusion as a Strategy of Government

Lecture | November 13 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 691 Barrows Hall


Center for Race and Gender


To what extent and how can those excluded from membership in the welfare state, but who are still present within its territorial borders, be lives to be cared for? How is the decision to care for certain lives made? What role do front line service providers play in (re)producing, defining, and negotiating state borders?



Building a Nation, Effacing a Race: The "Chinaman" Question of the U.S. in the Philippines, 1898-1905

Lecture | November 13 | 1-2:30 p.m. | 180 Doe Library


Richard Chu, Five College Associate Professor of History, University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Filipino and Philippine Studies Working Group


The lecture focuses on the first few years of American colonial rule in the Philippines. In particular, it looks into the “Chinaman” labor question facing the colonial rulers. How were the Chinese exclusion laws applied in the Philippines? How were the Chinese and other ethnic groups racialized to justify these laws in the Philippines?



Anthropology from Portugal, on Portugal and beyond Portugal: racialized relations and representations

Lecture | November 13 | 3-5 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall


Paula Mota Santos; Cristiana Bastos

Institute of European Studies, Portuguese Studies Program


Paula Mota Santos will speak about "Slavery as dark heritage in Post-colonial Portugal". The Lagos, Southern Portugal slavery exhibition is only the second European-located museum space dedicated to the transatlantic slave trade, and one institutionally linked to UNESCO’s Slave Route program. I will carry out an analysis of the images, texts and forms of display of the Lagos exhibition will be...   More >



Presence and Memory: Commemorating the Buddha in Late Burmese Wall Paintings

Lecture | November 13 | 4-6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library


Alexandra Green, Henry Ginsburg Curator for Southeast Asia, British Museum

Center for Buddhist Studies, Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Department of History of Art, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies


This presentation draws upon art historical, anthropological, and religious studies methodologies to analyze Burmese temple wall paintings from the late 17th to early 19th centuries and elucidate the contemporary religious, political, and social concepts that drove the creation of this lively art form.



Rewriting History in the Age of #MeToo

Lecture | November 13 | 4-6 p.m. | 3335 Dwinelle Hall


Amy Stanley, Associate Professor of History, Northwestern University

Department of History, Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Department of History Committee on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (CEDI), History Graduate Association (HGA)


The #MeToo movement is now over a year old, but over the past few weeks its stakes have become increasingly clear, not only in American culture and politics but also in many of our intellectual lives as historians. This talk considers how the rallying call “believe women” challenges our epistemology and might lead us to a different approach to our evidence. The sources are drawn from an early...   More >


Faculty, Students - Graduate



Twentieth-Century Anti-Utopianism and its West German Antidote

Lecture | November 13 | 5 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Jennifer Allen, Yale University

Institute of European Studies, Center for German and European Studies, GHI West, the Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute Washington DC


This talk picks up a melancholic thread in assessments of the end of the Cold War, when the triumph of liberal democracy and capitalism over “really existing socialism” led academics and public intellectuals to pronounce the end of utopian ambitions. Margaret Thatcher captured this idea in her claim that “there is no alternative.” Some West Germans, however, resisted this logic. Facing the...   More >



Poland at 100: The Continuing Challenges of Nationhood

Lecture | November 13 | 5:30-7 p.m. | Graduate Theological Union, Dinner Board Room


John Connelly, Professor, History, UC Berkeley

Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), SF-Krakow Sister City Association, Taube Philanthropies, Richard S. Dinner Center for Jewish Studies, Graduate Theological Union


This talk will consider the meanings and consequences of the reemergence of a Polish state in 1918 in new boundaries, after 125 years of rule by foreign powers. The event is celebrated as liberation, but what did it mean for ethnic minorities like Jews and Ukrainians? What did it mean for women? That Poland lasted barely twenty years before being overwhelmed by its totalitarian neighbors. Could...   More >



The Archaeology of Megiddo: New Light on the History of Ancient Israel

Lecture | November 13 | 6-7:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, 310 Banatao Auditorium


Israel Finkelstein, Tel Aviv University

Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology


By far the most important ancient city in Israel, Megiddo has worn many hats over the past five thousand years. During the Bronze Age, the city hosted cosmopolitan Canaanite kings whose relationships extended to Egypt, Turkey, and Mesopotamia. One thousand years later, ancient Israel's kings garrisoned the city, noting its strategic military position. Later writers so revered the city that they...   More >

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Industry-UCB-UEC Workshop 2018 (IUUWS 2018)

Conference/Symposium | November 14 | 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. | 3110 Etcheverry Hall


Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Department of Mechanical Engineering (ME)


Workshop Day 1: November 13 (Tues)

10:00 -10:30 Registration

10:30 -10:35 Opening Address:
Prof. Kazuo UCHIDA, Executive Committee Chairman of IUUWS
Department of Computer and Network Engineering, Graduate School of Informatics and Engineering, UEC

10:35 -10:45 Welcome Speech:
Prof. Masayoshi TOMIZUKA
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Associate Dean of...   More >



Townsend Center's Berkeley Book Chat: Daniel Boyarin: Judaism: The Genealogy of a Modern Notion

Lecture | November 14 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room


Townsend Center for the Humanities


Boyarin argues that the very concept of a religion of “Judaism” is an invention of the Christian church that was adopted by Jews only with the coming of modernity and the spread of Christian languages.


All Audiences

All Audiences



The Political Consequences of the Moratorium on the Death Penalty in 18th Century Russia

Lecture | November 14 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 270 Stephens Hall


Elena Marasinova, Professor of History, Faculty of Humanities, School of Philology, Higher School of Economics, Moscow

Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES)


Elena Marasinova, Professor of History, works at the Institute of Russian History (Russian Academy of Sciences) and the Higher School of Economics in Moscow. Professor Marasinova graduated from Moscow Lomonosov University and had a fellowship at the Max-Planck-Institut für Geschichte in Göttingen and Institut für osteuropäische Geschichte und Landeskunde at Tübingen Universität. She is a...   More >



Discovery and Digital Curation of Textual Archives

Lecture | November 14 | 12-1 p.m. | 254 Barrows Hall


Adam Anderson, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, UC Berkeley, Digital Humanities

Near Eastern Studies


In this talk I will introduce examples of "at-risk" textual archives from the ancient Near East. By exploring two ancient sites which have yielded large bodies of textual and material culture through illicit excavations, I will describe the latent archival organization found in the hoards of cuneiform tablets. Then, I will describe the computational methods that I and my colleagues have used to...   More >



Noon Concert: University Baroque Ensemble

Performing Arts - Music | November 14 | 12 p.m. |  Hertz Concert Hall


Department of Music


Christine Brandes, director

Continuing its 66th season, the Noon Concert series features the Music Department’s varied and diverse performance activities. Inaugurated in 1953, these concerts are very popular and well attended by those on campus and in the wider community. Traditionally on Wednesdays and Fridays, each concert begins promptly at 12:15 and ends by 1pm.


All Audiences

All Audiences



Cries and Whispers

Film - Feature | November 14 | 3:10-4:40 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Cries and Whispers depicts the final day of Agnes (Harriet Andersson), who lies in bed with cancer. Her most dear ones—her sisters, Maria (Liv Ullmann) and Karin (Ingrid Thulin), and a companion, Anna (Kari Sylwan)—watch over her. In a film as formal as a clock’s tick, Bergman restricts his palette to colors of blood, his close-ups to the image of the soul. The four women want strength to face...   More >



Linguistic Anthropology and Literary and Cultural Studies: A Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar: Session 3: Publics

Conference/Symposium | November 14 – 15, 2018 every day | 5-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall


Asif Agha, University of Pennsylvania; Virginia Jackson, UC Irvine; Constantine Nakassis, University of Chicago; Rosetta Young, UC Berkeley; Karin Barber, University of Birmingham; Francis Cody, University of Toronto; Nicholas Harkness, Harvard University

Department of Comparative Literature, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation


This is the third of seven two-day meetings of a Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar that will take place throughout 2018-2019. The seminar aims to explore the potential of a set of concepts, tools, and critical practices developed in the field of linguistic anthropology for work being done in the fields of literary and cultural criticism.



Adam Hochschild and Elizabeth Farnsworth: “Lessons from a Dark Time and Other Essays”

Panel Discussion | November 14 | 6:30-7:30 p.m. | North Gate Hall, Logan Multimedia Center (Room 142)


Graduate School of Journalism, Human Rights Center


In this rich collection, bestselling author Adam Hochschild has selected and updated over two dozen essays and pieces of reporting from his long career. Threaded through them all is his concern for social justice and the people who have fought for it. The articles here range from a California gun show to a Finnish prison, from a Congolese center for rape victims to the ruins of gulag camps in the...   More >


RSVP online.



ARCHITECTURE LECTURE: Carl Anthony

Lecture | November 14 | 6:30-8 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall


College of Environmental Design


WED, NOV 14, 6:30pm. Please join us for a talk with architect, environmental and social activist, and the co-founder of Breakthrough Communities Project. Co-sponsored by the Kenneth Simmons Community Lecture Endowment & CED Alumni of Color. Open to all!



As Above, So Below

Film - Feature | November 14 | 7-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Larry Clark’s portrayal of black insurgency is a rediscovered masterpiece. The film opens in 1945 with a young boy playing in his Chicago neighborhood and then follows the adult Jita-Hadi as a returning Marine with heightened political consciousness. It imagines a post–Watts rebellion state of siege and an organized black underground plotting revolution. With sound excerpts from the 1968 HUAC...   More >



Cine Latino: Neighboring Sounds

Film - Documentary | November 14 | 7-9 p.m. | 160 Kroeber Hall


Center for Latin American Studies


A palpable sense of unease hangs over a single city block in the coastal town of Recife, Brazil. Home to prosperous families and the servants who work for them, the area is ruled by an aging patriarch and his sons. When a private security firm is reluctantly brought in to protect the residents from a recent spate of petty crime, it unleashes the fears, anxieties, and resentments of a divided...   More >


All Audiences

All Audiences

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Situated Knowledges Thirty Years Later

Conference/Symposium | November 15 | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | 470 Stephens Hall | Canceled


Center for Science, Technology, Medicine & Society, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mgmt. (ESPM), Filipino & Philippine Studies Working Group


This day-long conference will celebrate and challenge the intellectual legacy of Donna Haraway's "Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective." Presenters from various disciplines will reflect on the impact of "situated knowledges" while offering new perspectives on and revisions to the concept since its introduction.



Situated Knowledges Thirty Years Later

Conference/Symposium | November 15 | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. | 470 Stephens Hall


Alastair Iles, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, U.C. Berkeley; Mitali Thakor, Assistant Professor, Science in Society Program, Wesleyan University; Sarah E. Vaughn, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, U.C. Berkeley; Jennifer L. Derr, Assistant Professor, Department of History, U.C. Santa Cruz; Lisa A. Brooks, Doctoral Candidate, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, U.C. Berkeley; Paul Michael L. Atienza, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Michael Mascarenhas, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, U.C. Berkeley; Victoria Massie, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Anthropology, U.C. Berkeley

Sibyl Diver, Research Scientist, Department of Earth Systems Science, Stanford University; Laura Lee Dev, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management

Ashton Wesner, Doctoral Candidate, Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, U.C. Berkeley

Julie Pyatt, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, U.C. Berkeley

Kathleen Cruz Gutierrez, Doctoral Candidate, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, U.C. Berkeley

Center for Science, Technology, Medicine & Society, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mgmt. (ESPM), Filipino & Philippine Studies Working Group, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, Science and Technology Studies Working Group, Graduate Assembly


This day-long conference will celebrate and challenge the intellectual legacy of Donna Haraway's "Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective." Presenters from various disciplines will reflect on the impact of "situated knowledges" while offering new perspectives on and revisions to the concept since its introduction.



The New Research Compact: Social Science Partnerships for the Common Good

Lecture | November 15 | 10 a.m.-12 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall


Alondra Nelson, President, Social Science Research Council

Social Science Matrix


Please join us on Thursday, November 15 from 10am-noon for the Social Science Matrix Distinguished Lecture, which will be delivered by Alondra Nelson, president of the Social Science Research Council and professor of sociology at Columbia University.

Abstract

For decades, the social sciences have generated knowledge vital to guiding public policy, informing business, and...   More >


All Audiences

All Audiences



Bancroft Library Roundtable: Pictures of a Gone City: Tech and the Dark Side of Prosperity in the San Francisco Bay Area

Lecture | November 15 | 12-1 p.m. | Faculty Club, Lewis-Latimer Room


Richard A. Walker, Professor Emeritus, Geography, UC Berkeley, and Director, Living New Deal Project

Bancroft Library


The SF Bay Area is currently the jewel in the crown of capitalism — the tech capital of the world and a gusher of wealth from the Silicon Valley Gold Rush. But there is a dark side of success: overheated bubbles and spectacular crashes; exploding inequality and millions of underpaid workers; a delusional tech elite; and complicity with the worst in American politics.


All Audiences

All Audiences

The Lewis-Latimer Room has a maximum capacity of 28 people. The doors will be shut and no more attendees may enter once the room is at capacity.



Digital Switzerlands: Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity Lunch Seminar

Seminar | November 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 205 South Hall


Kristen Eichensehr, Assistant Professor, UCLA School of Law

Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity (CLTC)


Abstract

U.S. technology companies are increasingly standing as competing power centers, challenging the primacy of governments. This power brings with it the capacity to bolster or undermine governmental authority, and also increasing public demands for the companies to protect users from governments. The companies’ power raises serious questions about how to understand their role,...   More >


All Audiences

All Audiences

RSVP online.



Winners and Losers in the 2018 Midterm Elections: Why it Happened and What it Means

Panel Discussion | November 15 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 820 Barrows Hall


Robert Van Houweling, Associate Professor, Berkeley Political Science; Thomas Mann, Senior Fellow in Governance Studies, The Brookings Institution; Bill Whalen, Virginia Hobbs Carpenter Fellow in Journalism, Hoover Institution

Jack Citrin, Professor Emeritus, UC Berkeley Department of Political Science

Social Science Matrix, Institute for the Study of Societal Issues (ISSI), The Jack Citrin Center for Public Opinion Research, Berkeley Public Policy and Law Program


Please join us for a panel reviewing the outcomes of the 2018 midterm elections, with an account of the factors producing this result. The discussion will provide competing perspectives on the implications of the elections for governance in the upcoming years—and for the shape of the 2020 presidential and congressional elections. The participants are leading scholars on Congress, public opinion,...   More >


All Audiences

All Audiences



Funding Opportunities for UC Berkeley in the European Union Horizon 2020 program

Workshop | November 15 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 201 Moses Hall


Jeroen Dewulf, Institute of Eureopean Studies; José Capilla, Technical University of Valencia; Carlos Ripoll, Technical University of Valencia

Institute of European Studies, European Union Center


The governance model on most universities is based on a shared responsibility between academics and governing boards at an institutional level. In the case of research and innovation strategies, it could be said that the aim is on setting up facilitation processes and not so much in defining a led based policy on some specific research challenges to be addressed. This approach can be compared...   More >


RSVP by November 14 by emailing Carlos Ripoll at cripoll@upv.es.



Is There A Light At The End Of The North Korean Nuclear Tunnel?

Lecture | November 15 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium


Siegfried S. Hecker, Center for International Security and Cooperation, Stanford University

Institute of International Studies, Center for Korean Studies (CKS), Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Nuclear Science and Security Consortium, Public Law and Policy Program


After a disastrous and dangerous 2017, diplomatic initiatives have opened a window for resolution of the North Korean nuclear crisis. But will the Trump administration's diplomacy succeed or fail as have all attempts over the past 25 years? I will offer my perspective based on seven visits to North Korea and our comprehensive study of North Korea's nuclear program.


All Audiences

All Audiences



Is this Right for Me? How to “Test Drive” Majors and Occupations: L&S Workshop Series Ursa Major

Workshop | November 15 | 4-6 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall


Graduate Mentors, College of L&S

College of Letters & Science, L&S Graduate Mentors


A workshop on using internships, externships, and volunteering to test out majors and careers.



On Indian Ground: California. A Return to Indigenous Knowledge: Generating Hope, Leadership, and Sovereignty through Education

Colloquium | November 15 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Dwinelle Hall, 117, Academic Innovation Studio | Note change in location


Nicole Myers-Lim, J.D., Executive Director, California Indian Museum and Cultural Center; Joely Proudfit, Ph.D., Director California Indian Culture & Sovereignty Center Professor, American Indian Studies Department Chair and Professor, American Indian Studies, California State University San Marcos

Center for Native American Issues Research on, American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Student Development, American Indian Graduate Student Association, Native American Studies, Indigenous Language Revitalization DE, Graduate School of Education


Dr. Joely Proudfit, Ph.D. is the Department Chair of American Indian Studies at California State University San Marcos and the Director of the California Indian Culture and Sovereignty Center. Nicole Myers-Lim, J.D. is the Executive Director of the California Indian Museum and Cultural Center. Dr. Proudfit and Ms. Lim have worked together for over twenty years and have collaborated on a number of...   More >



TDPS Speaker Series: Incarceration, Social Justice, Art, and Policy

Panel Discussion | November 15 | 4-5 p.m. | 44B Dwinelle Hall


Glenn Bailey, Activist; William Drummond, Professor of Journalism, UC Berkeley; Ayodele Nzinga, Playwright and Director

Eli Wirtschafter, Freelance Reporter and Producer

Department of Theater, Dance & Performance Studies


What happens when a person is wrongfully convicted? What if we can tell the story of this injustice through performance and theater and bring about change? This panel discussion will address the power of political performance made within prison systems and the people impacted by unjust incarceration practices. The panel will address how performance and art-making can lead to social justice...   More >


All Audiences



Linguistic Anthropology and Literary and Cultural Studies: A Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar: Session 3: Publics

Conference/Symposium | November 14 – 15, 2018 every day | 5-7 p.m. | 370 Dwinelle Hall


Asif Agha, University of Pennsylvania; Virginia Jackson, UC Irvine; Constantine Nakassis, University of Chicago; Rosetta Young, UC Berkeley; Karin Barber, University of Birmingham; Francis Cody, University of Toronto; Nicholas Harkness, Harvard University

Department of Comparative Literature, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation


This is the third of seven two-day meetings of a Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar that will take place throughout 2018-2019. The seminar aims to explore the potential of a set of concepts, tools, and critical practices developed in the field of linguistic anthropology for work being done in the fields of literary and cultural criticism.



Raza Rumi | Democracy and its Discontents - Project Naya Pakistan: The Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture for 2018

Lecture | November 15 | 5-7 p.m. | Stephens Hall, 10 (ISAS Conf. Room)


Raza Ahmad Rumi, Pakistani writer and a public policy specialist

Munis Faruqui, Chair, Institute for South Asia Studies, Associate Professor of South and Southeast Asian Studies

Institute for South Asia Studies, The Berkeley Pakistan Initiative, The Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture


Pakistani writer and a public policy specialist, Reza Ahmad Rumi delivers our sixth Mahomedali Habib Distinguished Lecture.



The Honorable Willie Brown

Lecture | November 15 | 6-7 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium


The Honorable Willie Brown

Goldman School of Public Policy, The Berkeley Forum


Join the Goldman School of Public Policy and the Berkeley Forum as they host the Honorable Willie Brown for the 2018 Michael Nacht Distinguished Lecture in Politics and Public Policy on Thursday, November 15. Two-term Mayor of San Francisco and Speaker of the California State Assembly Willie Brown will discuss the midterm elections and share his knowledge of California politics,...   More >



Interdisciplinary Marxist Working Group

Meeting | September 20 – December 13, 2018 every other Thursday | 6-8 p.m. | 306 Wheeler Hall


Department of English


Please join us for this semester's first meeting of the IMWG on Thursday, Sept 6 from 6-8pm in the Wheeler English lounge. We will be continuing with where we left off last semester in Capital, with plans to finish volume 1 by early October.

No prior knowledge of Capital or Marx is required, and everyone is welcome. I'm attaching a rough schedule, as our readings after Capital vol 1 will...   More >



JASC and KASC 2019 Information Session

Information Session | November 15 | 6 p.m. | 180 Doe Library


Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Center for Korean Studies (CKS)


Interested in going to Japan or Korea this summer?

Scholarships are available for UC Berkeley students attending the Japan-America or Korea-America Student Conference!


Students - Graduate, Students - Undergraduate

Staff, Students - Graduate, Students - Undergraduate



"Global Cinema and 1968": Ciné-tracts: Film Screening

Film - Documentary | November 15 | 7-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


Institute of European Studies, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the United States


In partnership with BAMPFA and the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in New York, the Institute of European Studies presents a special screening of the "Ciné-tracts," a selection of experimental short films by Jean-Luc Godard, Alain Resnais, and others, created amid the strikes and protests of May 1968 in Paris.

"Ciné-tracts" is part of the "Global Cinema and 1968" series, guest curated...   More >



MRED+D Visiting Fellow Lecture: Architect as Developer

Lecture | November 15 | 7-8:30 p.m. | 112 Wurster Hall


College of Environmental Design


Distinguished Visiting Fellow Jonathan Segal has designed some of the most livable and highly regarded residential, live/work, and mixed-use housing in California. His talk will pose the question: “What if architects could leverage their training and skil