Upcoming Events

Friday, September 15, 2017

A Self-Assembly Approach to the Origin of RNA: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | September 15 | 2-3 p.m. | 180 Tan Hall | Note change in location

 Prof. Nicholas V. Hud, Georgia Institute of Technology, Chem & Biochem

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

The prebiotic synthesis of RNA remains a critical and unsolved problem for origins of life research.

We are investigating the hypothesis that RNA evolved from an ancestral polymer (or proto-RNA) with molecular building blocks that had a strong propensity for self-assembly.

We are also exploring the hypothesis that oscillating environments facilitated RNA replication, before the emergence...   More >

Monday, September 18, 2017

Berkeley Lectures in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering presented by The Dow Chemical Company: Functionalizable Polypeptides and Polymeric siRNA Smart Delivery

Lecture | September 18 | 4-6 p.m. |  Anthony Hall

 Paula T. Hammond, Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 Department of Chemical Engineering

The controlled polymerization of N-carboxyanhydride monomers provides a means of generating synthetic polypeptides; however, until recently, only native amino acids were incorporated along the backbone. Our lab introduced an alkyne functionalized monomer, propargyl-L-glutamate, that enables the use of click chemistry post-polymerization, thus allowing the generation of a broad range of different...   More >

Bacterial Motility: Swim or Glide

Colloquium | September 18 | 4:15 p.m. | LeConte Hall, 1 LeConte

 Howard C. Berg, Harvard University

 Department of Physics, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Much is known about the swimming behavior of Escherichia coli. I will mention early work on tracking that revealed E. coli’s biased random walk, followed by the realization that bacterial flagella rotate rather than wave or beat. Then I will describe the signaling network that couples the receptors to the flagella, including adaptation that occurs both at the input and at the output of this...   More >

SLAM: Publishing in Top Journals: Secrets of the Insiders

Seminar | September 18 | 5:30-6:30 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Dr. Marcia McNutt, President of the National Academy of Sciences

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

Marcia McNutt (B.A. in physics, Colorado College; Ph.D. in earth sciences, Scripps Institution of Oceanography) is a geophysicist and the 22nd president of the National Academy of Sciences. From 2013 to 2016, she was editor-in-chief of Science journals. McNutt was director of the U.S. Geological Survey from 2009 to 2013, during which time USGS responded to a number of major disasters, including...   More >

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Making Sense of Pain: A Human Genetics Driven Multi-disciplinary, Multi-modality Approach to Drug Discovery

Seminar | September 19 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Dr. Margaret Chu-Moyer, Executive Director, Research, Amgen

 College of Chemistry

Recent advances in human genetics have allowed deeper insight into disease biology. Coupling of this to the development of molecules to further understand relevant pharmacology and to identify potential therapeutics has never been more important or more challenging. This lecture will demonstrate the scientific interplay that is necessary to discover human medicines using a recent multi-modality...   More >

Proteasomes can´t help it: The UPS between homeostasis, antigen processing and proteasome catalysed peptide splicing

Seminar | September 19 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Peter-Michael Kloetzel, Institut für Biochemie

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Plant and Microbial Biology Plant Seminar: "Role of viruses in the microbiome"

Seminar | September 20 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 David Pride, University of California, San Diego

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

Our laboratory focuses on the role that microbial communities play in human homeostasis, health and disease. We firmly believe that the various microbial components of human ecosystems including bacteria, viruses, archaea, and fungi are important factors that help determine the natural history of their hosts. Furthermore, their interactions with humans or their interactions with other microbial...   More >

David Pride

“Engineering self-assembled nanobiomaterials for therapeutic immunomodulation”

Seminar | September 20 | 12-1 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Evan Scott, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Self-assembled nanobiomaterials that are engineered to achieve specific biodistributions and mechanisms of degradation hold great promise for controlled stimulation of the immune system. Through the use of such rationally designed nanomaterials, we aim to investigate the basic inflammatory and immunological processes contributing to diverse pathologies and develop targeted immunotherapies. We...   More >

Cell Division: Mechanical Integrity with Dynamic Parts

Seminar | September 20 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Sophie Dumont, University of California, San Francisco

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Berkeley Lectures in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering presented by The Dow Chemical Company: Nanolayered Drug Release Systems for Regenerative Medicine and Targeted Nanotherapies

Lecture | September 20 | 4-6 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Paula T. Hammond, Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 Department of Chemical Engineering

Alternating electrostatic assembly is a tool that makes it possible to create ultrathin film coatings that contain highly controlled quantities of one or more therapeutic molecules within a singular construct. These release systems greatly exceed the usual ranges of traditional degradable polymers, ranging from 10 to as high as 40 wt% drug loading within the film. The nature of the layering...   More >

Thursday, September 21, 2017

The neural mechanism of aggression

Seminar | September 21 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Dayu Lin, New York University, School of Medicine

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Friday, September 22, 2017

QB3 Postdoc Seminar: Substrate analog and metal binding studies implicate a new role for the enzyme PqqB in the biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)

Seminar | September 22 | 4:30-5:30 p.m. | 177 Stanley Hall

 Eric Koehn (Judith Klinman lab)

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

Abstract
The redox cofactor pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a ribosomally encoded peptide product that plays a critical role in C1 metabolism and shows unique function as a bacterial vitamin. Biosynthesis of PQQ requires five gene products (PqqA-E). In PQQ production the substrate PqqA is first acted upon by PqqE, with the chaperone protein PqqD completing C-C bond formation between a Glu and...   More >

Monday, September 25, 2017

SLAM: Starting a Career at a Top-Tier Institution

Seminar | September 25 | 5:30-6:30 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

Insights from Professor Michelle Chang (Chemistry) and Professor Reza Alam (Mechanical Engineering) and Phil Geissler (Chemistry)!

Join us for an insightful discussion with our own UC Berkeley faculty members about what it’s really like to start a career at a top-tier institution. Learn about how to navigate the career change from post-doc to professor and how to position yourself for success.

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Synthesis and Study of Unusual Lipids

Seminar | September 26 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall | Canceled

 Prof. Noah Burns, Department of Chemistry, Stanford University

 College of Chemistry

Our group is particularly inspired by natural products not only because of their importance as synthetic targets but also due to their ability to serve as invaluable identifiers of unanswered chemical, medicinal, biological, and biophysical questions. One major focus of our research has been the selective halogenation of alkenes. Dihalogenation and halofunctionalization encompass some of the most...   More >

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Plant and Microbial Biology Plant Seminar: "Breaking the Silence - Chemical and Synthetic Approaches for Plant Developmental Biology"

Seminar | September 27 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Keiko Torii, University of Washington

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

The Torii lab studies how plant cells coordinate proliferation and differentiation during organ morphogenesis to generate beautiful, orderly patterns. We aim to understand the molecular and genetic bases of cell-cell communication that specifies organ size, shape, and stomatal patterning through integrated approaches.

Keiko Torii

“Listening in on crosstalk in signaling networks”

Seminar | September 27 | 12-1 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Lani Wu, UCSF

 Bioengineering (BioE)

How complex signaling networks shape highly-coordinated, multistep cellular responses is poorly understood. Biological networks are highly complex, containing many components and many putative interactions. We developed a network-perturbation approach to identify where and when signaling actually occurs. Our results, illustrated on polarity networks in neutrophils and morphogenic networks in...   More >

Thursday, September 28, 2017

EHS 201 Biosafety in Laboratories

Course | September 28 | 1:30-3:30 p.m. | 177 Stanley Hall

 Office of Environment, Health & Safety

This training is required for anyone who is listed on a Biological Use Authorization (BUA) application form that is reviewed by the Committee for Laboratory and Environmental Biosafety (CLEB). A BUA is required for anyone working with recombinant DNA molecules, human clinical specimens or agents that may infect humans, plants or animals. This safety training will discuss the biosafety risk...   More >

Nature and nurture in neurocognitive development: insights from studies of plasticity in blindness

Seminar | September 28 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Marina Bedny, John Hopkins, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Friday, September 29, 2017

Physico-Chemical Approaches to Understanding and Developing Cancer Immunotherapies: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | September 29 | 2-3 p.m. | 180 Tan Hall | Note change in location

 Prof. James R. Heath, Cal Tech, Chemistry

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

At the heart of most cancer immunotherapies are specific molecular interactions between the principle cancer cell killers, T cells, and the tumor-associated peptide antigens that are presented within the tumor environment.

I will discuss 2 separate projects relevant to understanding and harnessing these interactions. The first is a microchip/nanotech based single cell tool that is used for...   More >

Monday, October 2, 2017

SLAM: Funding your research: From startup to independence

Seminar | October 2 | 5:30-6:30 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Professor Aaron Fields, UCSF

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

Ever wonder how to effectively raise money to pay for a new lab, especially without a track record of success? How much does one graduate student cost anyways? Join us for a discussion with Aaron Fields, Ph.D., an Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at UCSF, to learn about his journey to fund his lab.

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Novartis Seminar in Organic Chemistry: Learning and Applying Nature’s Biosynthetic Logic

Seminar | October 3 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Prof. Bradley Moore, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego

 College of Chemistry

Nature as a chemist continues to teach and inform us about the wonders of complex organic synthesis in a cell. Recent advances in genomics and metabolomics have ushered in a new era in natural products research linking genes to molecules. Synthetic biology programs now offer streamlined approaches to the discovery, production, and design of gene-encoded small molecules. This presentation will...   More >

Recombinant Poliovirus Cancer Immunotherapy

Seminar | October 3 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Matthias Gromeier, Duke University Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Illumina Infosession: Bio-Tech Connect: Industry Infosession Series

Information Session | October 3 | 5-7 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Calling all engineers, biological, and chemical science majors
who desire to help develop life changing technologies -
we want to meet you! Our team of engineers and recruiters (alumni too!) are excited to share about who we are and how YOU fit within Illumina. We’ll also share about our internship process and full time opportunities. DINNER PROVIDED!
Hosted by the Department of...   More >

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Plant and Microbial Biology Plant Seminar: "Cheating, community context, and coevolution in the yucca-yucca moth mutualism"

Seminar | October 4 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Kari Segraves, Syracuse University

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

Understanding biodiversity requires more than identifying the number of species on earth. We must also elucidate how species interactions govern the dynamics of communities, ecosystems, and species diversity. My lab uses a broad combination of approaches including experimental ecology, field observations, molecular phylogenetics, and population genetics to understand the role that interspecific...   More >

“Science at Play!”

Seminar | October 4 | 12-1 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Michelle Khine, UC Irvine

 Bioengineering (BioE)

The challenge of micro- and nano-fabrication lies in the difficulties and costs associated with patterning at such high resolution. To make such promising technology – which could enable pervasive health monitoring and disease detection/surveillance - more accessible and pervasive, there is a critical need to develop a manufacturing approach such that prototypes as well as complete manufactured...   More >

Physiological functions of mitochondrial dynamics

Seminar | October 4 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 101 Morgan Hall

 David Chan, California Institute of Technology

 Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Monday, October 9, 2017

​Biophysical Cues and Ocular Cell Behaviors: The Big Impact of Little and Squishy Things

Seminar | October 9 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall

 Chris Murphy, D.V.M., PhD, Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science, UC Davis; Sara Thomasy, D.V.M., PhD, Associate Professor and Associate Researcher, Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences, UC Davis

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Biophysical cues, such as substratum topography and compliance, are ubiquitous attributes of the miroenvironment of cells. They have been proven to be as potent as soluble cytoactive factors in the modulation of cell behaviors. The main focus of our labs has been the investigation of how biophysical cues modulate cell adhesion, proliferation, migration, differentiation, and response to growth...   More >

EHS 201 Biosafety in Laboratories

Course | October 9 | 1:30-3:30 p.m. | 177 Stanley Hall

 Office of Environment, Health & Safety

This training is required for anyone who is listed on a Biological Use Authorization (BUA) application form that is reviewed by the Committee for Laboratory and Environmental Biosafety (CLEB). A BUA is required for anyone working with recombinant DNA molecules, human clinical specimens or agents that may infect humans, plants or animals. This safety training will discuss the biosafety risk...   More >

Allosteric inhibitors of protein synthesis: how structure and dynamics give rise to complex pharmacology

Seminar | October 9 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Jack Taunton, University of California, San Francisco

 College of Chemistry

SLAM: From the Farm, to the Pharm, to the Field

Seminar | October 9 | 5:30-6:30 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Professor Peggy Lemaux, UC Berkeley

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

"Genetically modified organisms" "Genetically engineered crops" These terms are used all the time by the general public. But how can scientists best discuss food-related issues with the public in a clear manner? Join us for a discussion with Dr. Lemaux to discuss strategies for communicating science based on her experience as an agricultural scientist using genetic engineering. Dr. Lemaux, in...   More >

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Host-microbe interactions: harnessing co-evolution to treat disease

Seminar | October 10 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Janelle Ayres, Salk Institute

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Plant and Microbial Biology Plant Seminar: “Seeing The Light: Color Vision and Photoacclimation in Cyanobacteria”

Seminar | October 11 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Beronda Montgomery, Michigan State University

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

The Montgomery Lab pursues a common research theme of understanding how individuals perceive, respond to, and are impacted by the environments in which they exist. Primary research efforts of the group are focused on the responses of photosynthetic organisms to external light cues. Additionally, Montgomery pursues this theme in the context of effective mentoring in research environments.

Molecular mechanism of cytokinesis

Seminar | October 11 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Tom Pollard, Yale University

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Molecular Mechanisms of Menkes Disease in Humans and Invertebrate Models

Seminar | October 11 | 4-5 p.m. | 114 Morgan Hall

 Victor Faundez, Emory University

 Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology

Molecular Mechanisms of Menkes Disease in Humans and Invertebrate Models

Seminar | October 11 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 101 Morgan Hall

 Victor Faundez, Emory University

 Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology

Friday, October 13, 2017

Multiple Metabolic Signals Establish a Deterministic Cell Fate Decision

Seminar | October 13 | 4-5 p.m. | 114 Morgan Hall

 Andreas Doncic, UT Southwestern Medical Center

 Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology

Multiple metabolic signals establish a deterministic cell fate decision

Seminar | October 13 | 4:10-5 p.m. | 114 Morgan Hall

 Andreas Doncic, UT Southwestern

 Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology

Saturday, October 14, 2017

2017 Bay Area Biotechnology Symposium (BABS)

Conference/Symposium | October 14 | 8:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m. |  UCSF Mission Bay Campus: Genentech Hall Byers Auditorium

 600 16th Street, San Francisco, CA

 UCSF School of Pharmacy

Big Pharma and Big Biotech in the Bay Area

Industry Outreach Program - UCSF School of Pharmacy - San Francisco, CA

Monday, October 16, 2017

Molecular mechanism of cellular motility

Seminar | October 16 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Tom Pollard, Yale University

 College of Chemistry

SLAM: Communicating science to the general public: Lessons from Known Universe and Particle Fever

Seminar | October 16 | 5:30-6:30 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Professor David Kaplan, Johns Hopkins University

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Division of Immunology and Pathogenesis

Seminar | October 17 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition | Canceled

 Michaela Gack, University of Chicago

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Alexander Pines Lecture in Physical Chemistry: Surprises in the physics of magnetic resonance; implications for chemical physics and molecular imaging

Seminar | October 17 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Warren S. Warren, Departments of Chemistry and Physics, Duke University

 College of Chemistry

Magnetic resonance is often presented as the prime example of the value of fundamental research. Indeed, the physicists who measured nuclear gyromagnetic ratios and spin quantum numbers 80 years ago could never have dreamed of its profound impact on chemistry, materials science, and medicine. But by the early 1960s, most physics departments (and many chemistry departments) viewed the fundamental...   More >

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

“Dynamics, Feedback, and Transient Antibiotic Resistance in Single Cells”

Seminar | October 18 | 12-1 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Mary Dunlop, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Cells live in uncertain, dynamic environments and have many mechanisms for sensing and responding to changes in their surroundings. However, sudden fluctuations in the environment can be catastrophic if a population relies solely on sensory responses, which have a delay associated with them. Cells can reconcile this by using a stochastic approach, creating phenotypic diversity within an isogenic...   More >

DNA polymerases, breaks, and cancer

Seminar | October 18 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 CANCELED-Richard Wood, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Genetic Approaches to Brain Circuit Mapping and Cell Type Characterization

Seminar | October 19 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Hongkui Zeng, Allen Institute for Brain Science

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Friday, October 20, 2017

QB3 Postdoc Seminar

Seminar | October 20 | 4:30-5:30 p.m. | 177 Stanley Hall

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

Speaker 1: Alison Walker (Miller lab)

Voltage imaging: New insights on neuronal network function

Abstract
Neurons communicate over long distances via electrical pulses called action potentials. It is often the precise timing of action potentials that encode the various and far-reaching functions of our nervous systems. Our goal is to understand how multiple neuronal cell types, with...   More >

Monday, October 23, 2017

​Imaging Retinal Ganglion Cells

Seminar | October 23 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall

 Don Miller, PhD, Indiana University School of Optometry

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Abstract: The retinal ganglion cell is the primary cell damaged by glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible visual loss worldwide. While we have a detailed understanding of the atrophy this disease inflicts on retinal ganglion cells, our ability to assess this damage in the living human eye is limited. A major obstacle is the difficulty to image—and thus count—these cells owing to their high...   More >

Chemical Tricks for Drugging the Undruggable

Seminar | October 23 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Kevan Shokat, University of California, San Francisco

 College of Chemistry

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Merck-Banyu Lecture in Organic Chemistry: Synthesis of Pillar-Shaped Macrocyclic Compounds “Pillar[n]arenes” Providing Supramolecular Assemblies

Seminar | October 24 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Prof. Tomoki Ogoshi, Kanazawa University

 College of Chemistry

Macrocyclic compounds play a major role in supramolecular chemistry because of their beautiful shape, nano-scale size and molecular recognition ability. Numerous supramolecular architectures have been constructed and studied as new components of materials as well as entities related to biological structural formation and functions using various macrocyclic hosts.
In 2008, we reported a new...   More >

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

EHS 201 Biosafety in Laboratories

Course | October 25 | 9:30-11:30 a.m. | 115 Energy Biosciences Building

 Office of Environment, Health & Safety

This training is required for anyone who is listed on a Biological Use Authorization (BUA) application form that is reviewed by the Committee for Laboratory and Environmental Biosafety (CLEB). A BUA is required for anyone working with recombinant DNA molecules, human clinical specimens or agents that may infect humans, plants or animals. This safety training will discuss the biosafety risk...   More >

Plant and Microbial Biology Plant Seminar: "In an immobile plant cell world, mobile endophytic microbes can seek, stop and destroy invading pathogens"

Seminar | October 25 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Manish Raizada, University of Guelph

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

The focus of the Raizada Lab is to develop low cost technologies that empower farmers in North America, Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, focusing on technologies that reduce the need for synthetic nitrogen fertilizers and pesticides to grow corn and other crops, by replacing them with more natural, biological resources. In particular, the lack of nitrogen fertilizer limits crop production, but...   More >

Manish Raizada

“Spatial genomics and single cell lineage dynamics by seqFISH and MEMOIR”

Seminar | October 25 | 12-1 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Long Cai, California Institute of Technology

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Identifying the spatial organization of tissues at cellular resolution from single cellgene expression profiles is essential to understanding many biological systems. We have developed an in situ 3D multiplexed imaging method to quantify hundreds of genes with single cell resolution via Sequential barcodedFluorescence in situ hybridization (seqFISH) (Lubeck et al., 2014). We used seqFISH to...   More >

Roger Y. Stanier Memorial Lecture: Choreography of bacterial nanomotors revealed by live-cell imaging

Seminar | October 25 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Judith Armitage, University of Oxford

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Roger Y. Stanier Memorial Lecture

Thursday, October 26, 2017

Division of Neurobiology and H. Wills Neuroscience Institute

Seminar | October 26 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition | Canceled

 Indira Raman, Northwestern University

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Friday, October 27, 2017

Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Single Cell Molecular Profiling: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | October 27 | 2-3 p.m. | 180 Tan Hall | Note change in location

 Prof. Xiaohu Gao, Univ. of Washington, Bioengineering

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

Nanoparticles in the 1-10 nm size range are of considerable current interest, not only because of their unique size-dependent properties but also their dimensional similarities with biological macromolecules (e.g., nucleic acids and proteins). These similarities could allow an integration of nanotechnology and biology, leading to major advances in medical diagnostics, prognostics, and targeted...   More >

Monday, October 30, 2017

Tick-tock of a Circadian Clock

Seminar | October 30 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Andy LiWang, University of California, Merced

 College of Chemistry

SLAM: Life Sciences at Google: Leaning into the Newest Silicon Valley Bug

Seminar | October 30 | 5:30-6:30 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Dr. Jane Wang, Verily

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

Dr. Jane Wang earned her B.S. from the California Institute of Technology in 2007 before moving to pursue her Ph.D. in Chemistry, as a Hertz Fellow, at UC Berkeley in the lab of Prof. Dean Toste. In the Toste lab her research focused on developing new catalytic and enantioselective methods for the addition of nitrogen and oxygen nucleophiles to olefins. She continued her career as a post-doctoral...   More >

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Biophysics of Protein Disorder, Single Molecules to Mesoscales

Seminar | October 31 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Ashok Deniz, Scripps Research Institute

 College of Chemistry

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Plant and Microbial Biology Plant Seminar: "Reprogramming root cells for AM symbiosis"

Seminar | November 1 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Maria Harrison, Cornell University

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

Most vascular flowering plants are able to form symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. These associations, named ‘arbuscular mycorrhizas’, develop in the roots, where the fungus colonizes the cortex to access carbon supplied by the plant. The fungal contribution to the symbiosis includes the transfer of mineral nutrients, particularly phosphorus, from the soil to the...   More >

Maria Harrison

“Mechanobiology of epithelial cells in physically heterogeneous environments”

Seminar | November 1 | 12-1 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Amit Pathak, Washington University in St. Louis

 Bioengineering (BioE)

The ability of epithelial cells to move through complex tissue barriers fundamentally regulates important physiological and pathological phenomena, such as embryogenesis, organ development, wound repair, and tumor metastasis. In pathogenesis, including fibrosis and cancer, matrix stiffening is known to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and enhance cell migration in clustered...   More >

Friday, November 3, 2017

Racemic Hydrogels from Self-Assembling Mirror Image Peptides: Predictions from Pauling and Corey: Nano Seminar Series

Seminar | November 3 | 2-3 p.m. | 180 Tan Hall | Note change in location

 Joel P. Schneider, Deputy Director, NIH Center for Cancer Research

 Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute

Hydrogels prepared from self-assembling peptides are promising materials for medical applications, and using both L- and D-peptide isomers in a gel’s formulation provides an intuitive way to control the proteolytic degradation of an implanted material. In the course of developing gels for delivery applications, we discovered that a racemic mixture of the mirror-image β-hairpin peptides,...   More >

Saturday, November 4, 2017

Structural and Quantitative Biology Seminar-template

Seminar | November 4 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Professor

 Department of Chemistry

Coffee & Refreshments served on lower level Stanley Hall @3:50pm-4:10pm

Monday, November 6, 2017

Analyzing RNA polymerase II with genomics approaches: an old dog with new tricks?

Seminar | November 6 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Julia Zeitlinger, Stowers Institute for Medical Research

 College of Chemistry

SLAM: Grow Your Own Scientists: Research with Undergraduates

Seminar | November 6 | 5:30-6:30 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Professor Miriam Bowring, Reed College

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

BASF Seminar in Chemical Sciences: Cysteine Arylation to Engineer Peptides and Proteins

Seminar | November 7 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Prof. Bradley Pentelute, Department of Chemistry, MIT

 College of Chemistry

Here we report a robust bioconjugation method using cysteine arylation. This chemistry enables site-specific conjugation at cysteine residues within peptides, proteins, and antibodies. Our two developed approaches use either perfluoroaryl-cysteine SNAr chemistry or organometallic palladium reagents. This work lead to the discovery of a self-labeling four-residue sequence that enables...   More >

C. H. Li Memorial Lecture: YAP/TAZ in stem cells and cancer

Seminar | November 7 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Stefano Piccolo, University of Padova

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

C. H. Li Memorial Lectures

Giving infrared spectroscopy a boost: New methods for studying interfaces, chirality, vibrational coupling across the spectrum, and proton transfer reactions

Seminar | November 7 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Poul Petersen, Department of Chemistry & Biology, Cornell University

 College of Chemistry

Mid-infrared (IR) spectroscopy directly interrogates the chemical bonds molecules are composed of through their vibrational frequencies and thus offers a direct and local probe of molecular structure and nuclear motion. However, ultrafast IR spectroscopy is very challenging and thus heavily technology driven. Progress is driven by technical advances and the development of new laser sources and...   More >

Gilead Infosession: Bio-Tech Connect: Industry Infosession Series

Information Session | November 7 | 5-7 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Join Gilead Sciences, a research-based biopharmaceutical company that delivers life-saving therapies to patients in need. DINNER PROVIDED
Accepting resumes for full-time and internship positions.
Hosted by the Department of Bioengineering and the Bioengineering Honor Society

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Plant and Microbial Biology Plant Seminar: "Molecular Mechanisms of Organelle Formation in Bacteria"

Seminar | November 8 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Arash Komeili, University of California, Berkeley

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

In the Komeili Lab, we have developed the tools to understand the molecular basis of magnetosome formation and magnetite biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. These advances have helped us to uncover the potential function of a large number of "magnetosome genes." The current efforts in the lab are centered around defining the specific functions of these factors and leveraging...   More >

Arash Komeili

C. H. Li Memorial Lecture: Control of cell behavior by mechanotransduction

Seminar | November 8 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Stefano Piccolo, University of Padua

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

C. H. Li Memorial Lectures

Using Light and Photoregulated Allosteric Ligands for the Precise Spatiotemporal Control of mGluRs Activity In Vivo

Seminar | November 8 | 4 p.m. | 177 Life Sciences Addition

 Amadeu Llebaria, Institute of Advanced Chemistry of Catalonia

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

UC Berkeley Career Connections: Biotech: Bio-Tech Connect: Alumni Night

Reception | November 8 | 6-8 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Join us to talk with alumni currently working in biotech. This year's theme is "Translating your skills from college to career." Learn how to talk about skills learned in school when applying for a job or internship.

Register and learn more in Handshake https://berkeley.joinhandshake.com/events/63044

Thursday, November 9, 2017

EHS 201 Biosafety in Laboratories

Course | November 9 | 1:30-3:30 p.m. | 177 Stanley Hall

 Office of Environment, Health & Safety

This training is required for anyone who is listed on a Biological Use Authorization (BUA) application form that is reviewed by the Committee for Laboratory and Environmental Biosafety (CLEB). A BUA is required for anyone working with recombinant DNA molecules, human clinical specimens or agents that may infect humans, plants or animals. This safety training will discuss the biosafety risk...   More >

Monday, November 13, 2017

SLAM: Perspectives on Academia after Working in Industry

Seminar | November 13 | 5:30-6:30 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Professor Jennifer Schomaker, University of Wisconsin- Madison

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Merck Seminar in the Chemical Sciences: Development of Direct C-H Amination Reactions

Seminar | November 14 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Prof. Sukbok Chang, KAIST

 College of Chemistry

Aryl amines are a key synthetic unit widely utilized in organic synthesis, coordination chemistry, materials science and pharmaceutical industry. Current preparative routes to those compounds require either prefunctionalized starting materials or conditions needing external oxidants, thus inevitably generating stoichiometric amounts of side wastes. We have developed a series of direct C-H...   More >

Genetic dissection of Chlamydia-mediated manipulation of host signaling pathways

Seminar | November 14 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Raphael H. Valdivia, Duke University

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Discovery, SAR Evolution, and Clinical Evaluation of Adenosine A2A Antagonists for the Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

Seminar | November 14 | 2-3 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Dr. Yeon-Hee Lim, Associate Principal Scientist, Merck Research Laboratories

 College of Chemistry

Mode- and state-selective nanoparticle dynamics from correlative light, ultrafast, and magneto-optical imaging

Seminar | November 14 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Kenneth Knappenberger, Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University

 College of Chemistry

Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is a powerful approach to developing structure-function relationships for nanoscale materials. Our group has developed nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging methods that can be used to pinpoint the location of an optical point source with one-nanometer transverse and ten-nanometer axial localization accuracies. Among the suite of NLO processes,...   More >

From Fly Pushing to Immunotherapeutics: My Journey in Drug Development

Seminar | November 14 | 4-5 p.m. | 177 Life Sciences Addition

 Hong Wan, Alexo

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

Hong Wan, an MCB PhD alum who has worked extensively in biotech and pharma research, will be returning to campus next week to give a career oriented seminar to current grad students and postdocs.

Author Event with Jennifer Doudna: A Crack in Creation: Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power to Control Evolution, Jennifer Doudna

Reading - Nonfiction | November 14 | 4:30-6 p.m. | Valley Life Sciences Building, Bioscience & Natural Resources Library

 Dr. Jennifer A. Doudna, Professor, UC Berkeley

 Library, Life & Health Sciences Division

Professor Doudna's new book chronicles the discovery of CRISPR and the ethical questions to come. Join us for a fascinating discussion with Professor Doudna on the timely and important issues explored in her book.

Dr. Jennifer A. Doudna

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Plant and Microbial Biology Plant Seminar: "Cellular basis of immunity"

Seminar | November 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 101 Barker Hall

 Silke Robatzek, The Sainsbury National Lab

 Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

A paradigm for more than a decade, it has been known that host membranes respond to pathogen perception. It is now clear that the secretory and endocytic trafficking network are engaged by the plant’s immune system to actively defend against potential pathogens. Reciprocally, invasive pathogens have evolved means to utilize these trafficking pathways for the suppression of plant defences and to...   More >

“Organ-Specific Microvascular Engineering towards Regeneration and Disease Modeling”

Seminar | November 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 290 Hearst Memorial Mining Building

 Ying Zheng, University of Washington

 Bioengineering (BioE)

Engineered tissues have emerged as promising new approaches to repair damaged tissues as well as to provide useful platforms for drug testing and disease modeling. Outstanding challenges remain in 1) the lack of well-defined and mature cell sources to facilitate translational outcomes and 2) the lack of control over vascular structure and perfusion efficiency in engineered 3D tissue constructs,...   More >

Mechanisms of DNA double-strand break repair

Seminar | November 15 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Tanya Paull, University of Texas at Austin

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Probing neural circuits with shaped light

Seminar | November 15 | 4-5 p.m. | 1011 Evans Hall

 Na Ji, University of California, Berkeley

 Department of Statistics

To understand computation in the brain, one needs to understand the input-output relationships for neural circuits and the anatomical and functional relationships between individual neurons therein. Optical microscopy has emerged as an ideal tool in this quest, as it is capable of recording the activity of neurons distributed over millimeter dimensions with sub-micron spatial resolution. I will...   More >

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Cell adhesion and signaling pathways governing CNS development and cancer

Seminar | November 16 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Joseph McCarty, MD Anderson Cancer Center

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

This seminar is partially sponsored by NIH

Friday, November 17, 2017

Metals in Cells: The Inorganic Foundation of Life

Seminar | November 17 | 4-5 p.m. | 120 Latimer Hall

 Amit Reddi, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Tech University

 College of Chemistry

Metalloproteins constitute one of the largest classes of proteins in the proteome and are involved in virtually every metabolic and signaling pathway of consequence to human health and disease. Research in the Reddi lab is focused on determining the cellular, molecular, and chemical mechanisms by which metalloproteins are activated by cells, and once activated, how they communicate with other...   More >

Monday, November 20, 2017

MBTG Seminar: "Stochastic Mechanisms in Membrane Traffic"

Seminar | November 20 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Jeanne Stachowiak, The University of Texas at Austin

 College of Chemistry

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

EHS 201 Biosafety in Laboratories

Course | November 21 | 9:30-11:30 a.m. | 177 Stanley Hall

 Office of Environment, Health & Safety

This training is required for anyone who is listed on a Biological Use Authorization (BUA) application form that is reviewed by the Committee for Laboratory and Environmental Biosafety (CLEB). A BUA is required for anyone working with recombinant DNA molecules, human clinical specimens or agents that may infect humans, plants or animals. This safety training will discuss the biosafety risk...   More >

Monday, November 27, 2017

Reconstructing eukaryotic chromosome replication with purified proteins

Seminar | November 27 | 4-5 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Dirk Remus, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

 College of Chemistry

SLAM: Teaching and Researching at Primarily Undergraduate Institutions

Seminar | November 27 | 5:30-6:30 p.m. | 106 Stanley Hall

 Professor Grace Lin Stokes, Santa Clara University

 QB3 - California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Allan C. Wilson Memorial Lecture: Rules of engagement: molecular arms races between host and viral genomes

Seminar | November 28 | 3:30-4:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Harmit Malik, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Allan C. Wilson Memorial Lectures