All events

<< Week of March 19 >>

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

The neuroscience of cognitive development and mathematics skill acquisition

Lecture | March 21 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Torkel Klingberg

 Department of Psychology

Professor Torkel Klingberg from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden will be giving a lecture in the Cognitive Neuroscience colloquium series in Psychology.

Food Politics and the Twenty-First Century Food Movement: Barbara Weinstock Lectures on the Morals of Trade by Marion Nestle

Lecture | March 21 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Dr. Marion Nestle, Paulette Goddard Professor of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health, New York University

 Graduate Division, Berkeley Food Institute

Marion Nestle will present the Weinstock lecture on March 21, 2017. Her lecture is titled "Food Politics and the Twenty-First Century Food Movement" and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Marion Nestle

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

The Neuroscience of Social Emotions and Cognition: From Ontogeny to Plasticity

Colloquium | March 22 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Tania Singer, Professor and Director, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

The social neurosciences have focused on the question of how people relate to and understand each other. Researchers have distinguished between at least two different routes on the understanding of others: one affective-motivational route referring to our ability to feel with (empathy) and for (compassion) another person, and a cognitive route allowing to infer other people's intentions, beliefs,...   More >

Friday, March 24, 2017

Formats for thinking

Seminar | March 24 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Elisabeth Camp, Rutgers University

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Many philosophers, logicians and psychologists assume an exhaustive and exclusive dichotomy between "imagistic", iconic, or pictorial representations and "discursive", logical, or propositional ones. Others dismiss the distinction as meaningless, on the ground that any content can be captured in propositional terms. Adherents of both positions often conclude that thought -- at least, cognition of...   More >