All events

Upcoming Events

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Aversion to Emotional Insurance: Costly Reluctance to Hedge Desired Outcomes

Colloquium | January 17 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Carey K. Morewedge, Professor, Boston University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

We examine whether people reduce the impact of negative outcomes through emotional hedging—betting against the occurrence of desired outcomes. We find substantial reluctance to bet against the success of preferred U.S. presidential candidates and Major League Baseball, National Football League, National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) basketball, and NCAA hockey teams. This reluctance is...   More >

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Gender and Race Gatekeeping

Colloquium | January 24 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Michelle "Mikki" Hebl, Professor, Rice University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

In this talk, Mikki will discuss the role of gatekeepers in preventing indviduals, often women and members of underrepresented groups, from attaining their potential. Mikki will review some of her programmatic research on subtle discrimination and will then provide some of her most recent studies and data on gender and race gatekeeping.

Friday, January 26, 2018

“Uncovering Perceptual Priors Using Automated Serial Reproduction Chains”: Psychology 229A

Colloquium | January 26 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Thomas Langlois, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Monday, January 29, 2018

I see you: Social gaze as a window of opportunity in early brain development

Colloquium | January 29 | 12:15-1:15 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Ronny Geva, The Gonda Brain Research Center, Bar Ilan University, Israel

 Department of Psychology

Social bonding—including the social learning that underpins the creation of early emotional ties between infants and their caretakers—are among the most fundamental developmental processes for human survival and well-being. Social attention is thought to play a crucial role in these processes, but little is known about the neurodevelopmental mechanisms—particularly regarding the involvement of...   More >

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Where

Colloquium | January 30 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Patrick Cavanagh, Department of Psychology, Glendon College and Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College

 Department of Psychology

How do we know where things are? Recent results indicate that an object’s visual location is constructed at a high level where, critically, an object’s motion is discounted to recover its current location, much like we discount the illumination when we perceive color. As a result we sometimes see a target far from its actual location. These predictions operate differently for eye movements,...   More >

Clinical Science Colloquium

Colloquium | January 30 | 3:40-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3105 Beach Room

 Maria Watson Ph.D

 Department of Psychology

In this talk Maria will present an overview of the clinical treatment (individual and group CBT and Motivational Interviewing) and long-term management (Peer Support and Harm Reduction) of Hoarding Disorders. The focus will be on adapting your evidence-based “tool kit” and treatment goals, to work with these often complex and highly comorbid clients, in real life settings.

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Sensory Integration, Density Estimation, and Information Retention

Seminar | January 31 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall

 Joe Makin, UCSF

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

A common task facing computational scientists and, arguably, the brains of primates more generally is to construct models for data, particularly ones that invoke latent variables. Although it is often natural to identify the latent variables of such a model with the true unobserved variables in the world, the correspondence between the two can be more complicated, as when the former are...   More >

Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right

Colloquium | January 31 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Arlie Hochschild, Professor Emerita, UC Berkeley Department of Sociology

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Arlie Hochschild's latest book, Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right (The New Press, September 2016) focuses on the rise of the American right. Based on intensive interviews of Tea Party enthusiasts in Louisiana, conducted over the last five years and focusing on emotions, Hochschild scales an “empathy wall” to learn how to see, think and feel as they do. What do...   More >

Friday, February 2, 2018

“Why The Mind Evolved: The Evolution Of Navigation”: Psychology 229A

Colloquium | February 2 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Lucia Jacobs, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Monday, February 5, 2018

How adolescents navigate uncertainty, with a little help from their friends

Colloquium | February 5 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Wouter van den Bos, Center for Adaptive Rationality, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin

 Institute of Human Development

Despite the increased prevalence of adolescent risk-taking behavior in the real world, laboratory evidence of adolescent specific risk taking propensity remains scarce. In contrast with the lab, adolescents in the real world often have only incomplete information about risks. There is currently very little known about how adolescents make decisions under these uncertain conditions. To address...   More >

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Cognitive Adaptations to Harsh Environments

Lecture | February 6 | 10-11:30 a.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Willem Frankenhuis, Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University

 Department of Psychology

Growing up in a harsh environment has a major impact on cognition. People from such environments tend to score lower on a variety of cognitive tests. The predominant view in psychology is, therefore, that chronic exposure to harsh conditions impairs cognition. I have recently challenged this consensus by proposing that harsh environments do not exclusively impair cognition. Rather, people also...   More >

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Racial and political dynamics of an approaching majority-minority United States

Colloquium | February 7 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Jennifer Richeson, Professor, Yale University

 Department of Psychology

Ongoing and projected demographic shifts in the racial composition of the United States have been heralded as necessitating, if not promoting, positive change in the racial dynamics of the nation. Although change in response to this growing diversity is likely, its direction and scope are less clear. In this talk, I will present emerging social-scientific research on the psychological, social,...   More >

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Summer Opportunities Fair

Special Event | February 8 | 2-4 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Pauley Ballroom

 Summer Sessions

Wondering what to do next summer? Visit the Summer Opportunities Fair to learn about exciting summer options for UC Berkeley students, including summer courses, study abroad, student jobs and internships, research, volunteer and service, and more.

Representatives from Berkeley campus units will be tabling with information on their courses and programs.

Friday, February 9, 2018

“Exploring Curiosity in Human and Reinforcement Learning agents”

Colloquium | February 9 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Rachit Dubey, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Even in absence of external rewards, babies and scientists explore the world around them. For this reason, curiosity has long been recognized as a hallmark of human exploration and the essence of science. Despite its importance, we lack even the most basic understanding of the basis, mechanisms, and purpose of curiosity. In this talk, I will provide a brief overview of some of my projects which...   More >

Monday, February 12, 2018

Neural Mechanisms of the Development of Face Perception

Colloquium | February 12 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Kalanit Grill-Spector, Stanford University

 Department of Psychology

How do brain mechanisms develop from childhood to adulthood? There is extensive debate if brain development is due to pruning of excess neurons, synapses, and connections, leading to reduction of responses to irrelevant stimuli, or if development is associated with growth of dendritic arbors, synapses, and myelination leading to increased responses and selectivity to relevant stimuli. Our...   More >

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Intracranial electrophysiology of the human default mode network: Where fMRI got it wrong

Colloquium | February 13 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Josef Parvizi, Department of Neurology, Stanford University

 Department of Psychology

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

45 years of studying stress, social relationships and health: 8 pivotal moments that changed the course of my career

Colloquium | February 14 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Sheldon Cohen, Professor, Carnegie Mellon University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

This talk is a summary of Dr. Cohen’s research over the last 45 years. It is organized by “pivots” – experiences that altered the direction of his work. Work he will discuss includes studies of the effects of environmental noise (traffic and aircraft) on cognition, affect and physiology of elementary school children; of the role of social ties, social supports, and social conflicts in physical...   More >

Friday, February 16, 2018

Representing Linguistic Knowledge With Probabilistic Models

Colloquium | February 16 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Stephan Meylan, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Ph.D. Exit Talk

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: 3rd year talks

Colloquium | February 20 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Paul Krueger, Graduate Student, Psychology Department, UC Berkeley; Maria Eckstein, Graduate Student, Psychology Department, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Clinical Science Colloquium

Colloquium | February 20 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Beach Room 3105

 Professor Michelle G. Craske from UCLA, UCLA

 Department of Psychology

Inhibitory learning and regulation during exposure therapy: from basic science to clinical application

Clinical Science Colloquium

Colloquium | February 20 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Beach Room 3105

 Michelle Craske, Ph.D

 Department of Psychology

The therapeutic strategy of repeated exposure is effective for fears and anxiety disorders, but a substantial number of individuals fail to respond. Translation from the basic science of inhibitory extinction learning and inhibitory regulation offers strategies for increasing response rates to exposure therapy. The underlying theories and evidence for these strategies will be presented, including...   More >

Friday, February 23, 2018

Preschoolers Rationally Use Evidence To Select Causally Relevant Variables.: Psychology 229A

Colloquium | February 23 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Mariel Goddu, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Two 30 minute research talks by current graduate students.

“A Rational Account of Inaccurate Self-Assessment”: Psychology 229A

Colloquium | February 23 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Rachel Jansen, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Two 30 minute research talks by current graduate students.

Monday, February 26, 2018

The Role of Attachment in Perceived Relationships with Deities

Colloquium | February 26 | 12:10-1:20 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Frances Nkara, Psychology Department

 Department of Psychology

Religious believers’ perceived relationships with deities likely promote the pervasiveness of theistic religions, especially if these relationships engender or promise attachment-related “felt security”. Specific expectations and behavior within these perceived relationships might be derived from individual differences in implicit, internal working models or states of mind regarding attachment...   More >

Attachment, Religion, and Spirituality: A Wider View

Colloquium | February 26 | 12:10-1:20 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Pehr Granqvist, Visiting scholar from Stockholm University

 Department of Psychology

I will outline a book on the attachment-religion connection that I am currently composing as a visiting scholar. The book has been contracted with Guilford and has Dist. Prof. Em. Phillip R. Shaver from UC Davis as editor. I will focus the talk on four reasons for choosing “A Wider View” as subtitle. First, I argue that Bowlby restricted attachment theory unnecessarily by insisting that...   More >

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: 3rd year talks

Colloquium | February 27 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Nick Angelides, Graduate Student, Psychology Department, UC Berkeley; Vinitha Rangarajan, Graduate Student, Psychology Department, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Clinical Science Colloquium

Colloquium | February 27 | 3:40-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3105 Beach Room

 Dr. Lonnie Snowden

 Department of Psychology

"By expanding Medicaid, a very large safety net health insurance program, and by including mental health and substance abuse coverage as essential benefits that must be covered at "parity" with other conditions, the Affordable Care Act greatly increased behavioral health treatment possibilities for African Americans and other low income populations. However, despite strong financial incentives to...   More >

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Department of Psychology Colloquium - Reflections on Psychology in Tolman Hall: Departmental Divide, Diversity, and Faculty Celebrations

Colloquium | February 28 | 3:10-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Stephen Glickman; Ervin Hafter; Ann Kring; Donald Riley; Rhona Weinstein; Sheldon Zedeck

 Faculty Lectures Committee, Department of Psychology

We continue with Part 2 of the "History of the Psychology Department" series, focusing on the early years in Tolman Hall (1962-1979). Among the themes to be discussed are the initial dedication of Tolman Hall, the Department's reunification, the initial diversification of the Department to include women and minority faculty, and a review of several key figures. On the eve of our move to...   More >

Friday, March 2, 2018

Determinants and Consequences of the Need for Explanation

Colloquium | March 2 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Emily Liquin, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

30 minute research talk by graduate student

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: 3rd year talks

Colloquium | March 6 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Joe Winer, Graduate Student, Psychology Department, UC Berkeley; Christina Merrick, Graduate Student, Psychology Department, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Clinical Science Colloquium

Colloquium | March 6 | 3:40-5 p.m. | LeConte Hall, Room 1

 Kay Jamison, Ph.D

 Department of Psychology

The talk will focus on mania and its ancient origins; on the similarities between the psychological effects of mania and war; and the power of words (and the limits of words) in healing the mind recovering from mania. Most particularly, the talk will center on the American poet Robert Lowell and the importance of writing in healing his mind during the wake of repeated attacks of psychotic mania.

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Excess Baggage: How Physicians' and Patients’ Race-Related Beliefs and Attitudes Affect Racially Discordant Clinical Interactions

Colloquium | March 7 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Louis A. Penner, Professor, Wayne State University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

There are pervasive and persistent disparities in the health of Nonhispanic White Americans and most racial ethnic/minorities; the greatest of these are between Black and White Americans. There are multiple, complex reasons for this but disparities in the quality of healthcare received by Black and by White patients is one well-documented cause. One important aspect of healthcare disparities...   More >

Friday, March 9, 2018

“Leveraging Deep Neural Networks To Study Human Cognition”

Colloquium | March 9 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Joshua Peterson, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Ph.D. Exit Talk

Distinguished Faculty Research Lecture: The Power and Value of Minority Opinion

Lecture | March 9 | 3 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll room

 Charlan Nemeth, Professor of the Graduate School, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

This talk will deal with a career long investigation of the power of minority opinions, which initially focused on how they “persuade” and subsequently on their value in stimulating thought. Witnessing dissent, our thinking becomes more open and less biased, the kind of thinking that leads to better decisions and more creative solutions.
This research, conducted over 40 years, underscores two...   More >

Monday, March 12, 2018

Comparative Neurobiology of Social Bonds - from Rodents to Primates to Humans

Colloquium | March 12 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Karen Bales, Department of Psychology, UC Davis

 Department of Psychology

Social bonds are critical to human health and well-being. However, most of what we know regarding the neurobiology of strong, selective social bonds ("pair-bonds") comes from a socially monogamous rodent, the prairie vole. In my laboratory, we also study a socially monogamous primate, the titi monkey, as a model for the neurobiology of pair bond formation and maintenance. We have characterized...   More >

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

The Persistence of Gender Inequality from Interpersonal and Intergroup Perspectives

Colloquium | March 14 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Laura Kray, Professor, Haas School of Business

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Laura Kray will weigh evidence in support of a popular explanation for women’s lesser outcomes in pay and career advancement—the belief that women are poor advocates for themselves.

Friday, March 16, 2018

The Impact of Mental State Inferences for Legal Outcomes

Colloquium | March 16 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Carly Giffin, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Ph.D. Exit Talk

Misery and Pleasure in the Origins of the Study of Happiness

Colloquium | March 16 | 1:10-2:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Daniel Horowitz, Professor Emeritus, Smith College

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

In December 2017, Oxford University Press published 'Happier? The History of a Cultural Movement That Aspired to Transform America' by Daniel Horowitz, an emeritus professor from Smith College. Focusing on the period from 1940 to 1970, this talk will cover some of the origins of the study of happiness and then go on to suggest some of the key aspects that shaped the field in the last half century.

Monday, March 19, 2018

Developmental Psychology Colloquium

Colloquium | March 19 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Yuan Meng, Department of Psychology; Ruthee Foushee, Department of Psychology

 Department of Psychology

Yuan Meng



Children’s Causal Interventions Combine Discrimination and Confirmation

Like scientists, children can design "experiments" to distinguish between causal structures, but their performance often falls short of information-theoretic metrics such as the expected information gain (EIG). Such deviation may have resulted from mixing normative discriminatory strategies such as...   More >

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Chronic ambulatory brain recording in Parkison's disease using a totally implantable neural interface.

Colloquium | March 20 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Philip Starr, Professor, Department of Neurosurgery, UCSF

 Department of Psychology

Friday, March 23, 2018

What can science explain? Folk epistemic judgments in adults

Colloquium | March 23 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Sara Gottlieb

 Department of Psychology

Ph.D Exit Talk

Friday, March 30, 2018

The Science and Practice of Resilience

Workshop | March 30 | 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Rick Hanson, Ph.D.

 The Greater Good Science Center

Mental resources like determination, self-worth, and kindness are what make us resilient: able to cope with adversity and push through challenges in the pursuit of opportunities. While resilience helps us recover from loss and trauma, it offers much more than that. True resilience fosters well-being, an underlying sense of happiness, love, and peace. Remarkably, as you internalize experiences of...   More >

 $139-$159

  Buy tickets online

Monday, April 2, 2018

Neurodevelopmental Mechanisms linking Early Adversity with Adolescent Psychopathology

Colloquium | April 2 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Kate McLaughlin, Department of Psychology, University of Washington

 Institute of Human Development

Children who have experienced environmental adversity—such as abuse, neglect, or poverty—are at markedly elevated risk for developing psychopathology. What is less clear is how and why adverse early experiences exert such a profound influence on mental health. Identifying developmental processes that are disrupted by adverse early environments is the key to developing better intervention...   More >

Tuesday, April 3, 2018

Jonathan Haidt Presents: 'The three worst ideas in the world, and how they shape American education'

Lecture | April 3 | 4:15 p.m. | 310 Sutardja Dai Hall

 Jonathan Haidt, New York University Stern School of Business

 Department of Political Science & The Baxter Liberty Initiative

Jonathan Haidt is a social psychologist at New York University Stern School of Business and the director of Heterodox Academy. He is the coauthor of the forthcoming book, 'The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting up a Generation for Failure'.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

“It’s the skin you’re in”: What is this thing called ‘race’ and how does it get into the body?

Colloquium | April 4 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Amani Nuru-Jeter, Associate Professor, UC Berkeley School of Public Health

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

This talk will explore the concept of race and discuss how ontological conceptions of race impact the questions we ask, the nature of our scientific investigations, and the conclusions we draw from scientific evidence. I will discuss racism as a determinant of health and the need for conceptual rigor for advancing the study of race, racism and embodiment in social epidemiology. Drawing on recent...   More >

In Defense of troublemakers: A conversation with Charlan Nemeth"

Special Event | April 4 | 7-8:30 p.m. |  California Institute of Integral Studies

 1453 Mission St., San Francisco, CA

 Charlan Nemeth interviewed, California Institute of Integral Studies

 California Institute of Integral Studies

An interview of Charlan Nemeth on her new book "In defense of troublemakers: the power of dissent in life and business" on the "perils of consensus" and the "power of dissent"

Friday, April 6, 2018

“Resource-Rational Attention Allocation”

Colloquium | April 6 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Fred Callaway, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

One of two 30 min research talks by graduate students.

Learning High-Level Actions By Minimizing Algorithmic Complexity

Colloquium | April 6 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Sophia Sanborn, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

One of two 30 min research talks by graduate students.

Resource-Rational Attention Allocation

Colloquium | April 6 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Fred Callaway

 Department of Psychology

Monday, April 9, 2018

Cognitive Neurosciences Seminar

Seminar | April 9 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Dr. Zhaoping Li, Computer Sciences. UCL

 Department of Psychology

Abstract: Investigations in the recent years have revealed an important functional role of the primary visual cortex (V1): it creates a bottom-up saliency map to guide attentional shifts exogenously. I will review these findings to motivate a new path to understanding vision. This new path views vision as made of three stages: encoding, selection, and decoding; the selection and decoding stages...   More >

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Computational dysfunctions in anxiety: Failure to differentiate signal from noise

Colloquium | April 10 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Martin Paulus, Scientific Director and President, Laureate Institute for Brain Research

 Department of Psychology

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Cultural variation in social judgments of smiles: The role of ideal affect

Colloquium | April 11 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Jeanne Tsai, Professor, Stanford University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

In this talk, I will describe a series of studies demonstrating that cultural differences in how people ideally want to feel (their “ideal affect”) shape how they judge and treat others. Consistent with previous findings that European Americans value excitement states more than East Asians do, European Americans judge open toothy "excited" smiles (vs. closed "calm" smiles) as more affiliative...   More >

Thursday, April 12, 2018

In Defense of troublemakers: The Power of Dissent in Life and Business

Special Event | April 12 | 7:30-8:30 p.m. |  Hillside Club

 2286 Cedar St, Berkeley, CA

 Charlan Nemeth, Prof Graduate School, Univ of California Berkeley

 KPFA Radio FM

An interview and Q&A of Charlan Nemeth on her new book "In defense of troublemakers.." on the "perils of consensus" and the "power of dissent"

 $12

  Buy tickets online

Friday, April 13, 2018

“Searching For Scents: Human And Dog Behavior During Odor Navigation”

Colloquium | April 13 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Judy Jinn, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Ph.D. Exit Talk

Monday, April 16, 2018

Children's descriptive-to-prescriptive tendency

Colloquium | April 16 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Steven O. Roberts, Department of Psychology, Stanford University

 Department of Psychology

Young children are quick to take a normative stance – they interpret world around them as being governed by standards and rules that must be followed. On the one hand, normative reasoning is useful in that it promotes one’s self (e.g., facilitating learning), one’s culture (e.g., transmitting practices across generations), and one’s group (e.g., increasing group functioning). On the other hand,...   More >

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Neural oscillations: What we're doing wrong

Colloquium | April 17 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Brad Voytek, Professor, Department of Cognitive Science, UCSD

 Department of Psychology

Friday, April 20, 2018

“Psychology In The Internet Age: Leveraging Big Data To Evaluate Models Of Cognition”

Colloquium | April 20 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 David Bourgin, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Ph.D. Exit Talk

Monday, April 23, 2018

Psychology Poster symposium

Conference/Symposium | April 23 | 4-6 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Warner Brown and Beach rooms

 Department of Psychology

You’re cordially invited to the 2018 psychology poster session, where our 2nd year graduate and honors students will present their newest research.
We’ll be in the Beach and Warner Brown rooms, 4/23 4-6pm. Snacks and refreshments will be served.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Simultaneous representation of sensory and mnemonic information in human visual cortex.

Colloquium | April 24 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 John Serences, Department of Psychology, UCSD

 Department of Psychology

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Message Intended is Not Message Received: Shame, Stigma, and Disengagement in the Academic Probation Notification Process

Colloquium | April 25 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Shannon Brady, Postdoctoral Scholar, Stanford University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

An important institutional and societal dilemma is how to notify people when they are not meeting performance or community standards without undermining their motivation and efforts to do so. Focusing on the context of college students being placed on academic probation, I find that college administrators overwhelmingly intend probation to be helpful to and motivating for students but that...   More >

Friday, April 27, 2018

Competence, Performance, and Norms for Religious Credence

Colloquium | April 27 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Neil Van Leeuwen, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Hosted by Tania Lombrozo

Education, plasticity and learning: the virtuous cycle between education and neuroscience

Lecture | April 27 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Jason D. Yeatman, PhD, Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences, University of Washington

 Department of Psychology

Reading instruction prompts the emergence of neural circuits that are specialized for rapidly translating printed symbols into sound and meaning. Understanding how these circuits differ in children with dyslexia, and change with learning, is an important scientific challenge that holds practical implications for education. In this talk I will present new data linking changes in the white matter...   More >

Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Scabs: The Social Suppression of Labor Supply

Colloquium | May 2 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Supreet Kaur, Assistant Professor, UC Berkeley Department of Economics

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

A distinguishing feature of the labor market is social interaction among co-workers---providing the ingredients for social norms to develop and constrain behavior. We use a field experiment to test whether social norms against accepting wage cuts distort workers' labor supply during periods of unemployment. We partner with 183 existing employers, who offer jobs to 502 randomly-selected laborers...   More >

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

A new perspective on the social functions of emotions: Gratitude and the witnessing effect

Colloquium | May 9 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Christopher Oveis, Assistant Professor, UC San Diego Rady School of Management

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

We propose a novel theoretical and empirical approach to studying group-level social functions of emotions and use it to make new predictions about social consequences of gratitude. Here, we document the witnessing effect: In social groups, emotional expressions are often observed by 3rd party witnesses—family members, co-workers, friends, and neighbors. Emotional expressions coordinate group...   More >

Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Multilevel Modeling: What it is, when you need it (and when you don't), and 4 important questions to ask every time you use it

Information Session | September 5 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Amie Gordon, Postdoctoral Fellow, UC San Francisco

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Multilevel modeling (MLM) is everywhere these days. Reviewers are increasingly asking people to use this advanced approach to statistics and there are more and more online calculators devoted to helping people run MLM analyses. But MLM requires making a lot of choices, and without a clear understanding of what MLM is, it is easy to make mistakes. In this one hour whirlwind tour of MLM, I will...   More >

Understanding human sociality: From brain to behavior to society

Colloquium | September 5 | 5:15-6:15 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Professor Ming Hsu

 Department of Psychology

Abstract: There is increasing concern that the proliferation of AI-driven automation—particularly in areas dealing with labor markets, education, and criminal justice—may perpetuate and even amplify preexisting biases and social inequities facing certain groups of individuals. However, despite the rich social scientific literature on these topics, we are still far from methods and tools that can...   More >

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Our Emotions, Our Bodies, Ourselves: Sources of Variability in our Affective Responses to the World

Colloquium | September 12 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Erika H. Siegel, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Research Fellow, UC San Francisco

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Traditional theories about emotion posit that variation in responses to evocative stimuli is epiphenomenal, or unrelated, to the experience of emotion. In this talk, I present data from a meta-analysis on bodily responses during emotion from which I will argue that variation in responses is pervasive and normative and that understanding the full scope of human emotion requires broadening our view...   More >

Monday, September 17, 2018

Looking to learn and learning to look: The development of infants’ visual attention

Colloquium | September 17 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 1102 Berkeley Way West

 Lisa Oakes, University of California, Davis

 Department of Psychology

For decades researchers have measured infants’ looking behavior. Much of this work has focused on what looking reveals about other cognitive processes. In this talk I will discuss the development of looking as a key visual behavior that both reflects aspects of cognition and directly influences cognitive development. I argue that by considering the multiple factors that influence where and how...   More >

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Clinical Science Psychology Students 3rd Yr Talk

Colloquium | September 18 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 1102 Berkeley Way West

 2121 Berkeley Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-1650

 Jamie Villegas

 Department of Psychology

GARRET ZIEVE
Title: Client memory for treatment: A program of research at the intersection of cognitive, educational, and clinical science

CECE ARMSTRONG
Title: 'A theory-guided process evaluation of barriers and facilitators to behavior change after receiving the Transdiagnostic Intervention for Sleep and Circadian Dysfunction'

KALEY CURTIS
Parent-child emotion discussion is linked to...   More >

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Clinical Science Psychology Student 3rd Yr Talk

Colloquium | September 25 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 1102 Berkeley Way West

 Lauren Weittenhiller; Jenna Wells

 Department of Psychology

Lauren Weittenhiller 
Title:  "Social Narratives in Schizophrenia: Motivations and Barriers" 

Jenna Wells
Title: Poor emotion suppression is associated with increased anxiety in caregivers of patients with neurodegenerative disease

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

IPSR Brownbag Talks

Colloquium | September 26 | 12:10-1 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Michael O’Donnell, PhD Candidate, BerkeleyHaas; Michael Rosenblum, PhD Candidate, BerkeleyHaas

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

An informal gathering in which graduate students and postdoctoral fellows present their work to faculty and students and receive suggestions and feedback. Our presenters are:

Michael O'Donnell
"Preference Reversals in Willingness-to-Pay and Choice"

Michael Rosenblum
“Tell It Like It is: When Political Incorrectness Promotes Authenticity”

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Clinical Science Psychology Students 3rd Yr Talk

Colloquium | October 2 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 1102 Berkeley Way West

 Department of Psychology

Peter Soyster
Title: On the path to precision behavioral health interventions: Idiographic modeling and forward prediction of cigarette use  

Manon Ironside
Title: Decision Approaches to the Explore-Exploit Dilemma in Bipolar Disorder

Wednesday, October 3, 2018

How Realistic is Photorealistic?: ICBS / Vision talks

Presentation | October 3 | 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Professor Hany Farid, School of Information & Depts. Electrical Engineering and Computer Science UC Berkeley.

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Professor Farid will describe a series of experiments that measure observers’ ability to distinguish the photographic from the computer-generated, simple steps that can be taken to improve observer accuracy, and preliminary studies that attempt to determine how observers are performing this task.

 Please ask questions in a respectful manner

Being Real

Colloquium | October 3 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Chris Hopwood, Associate Professor, UC Davis

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Although the concept of authenticity has been an enduring interest among philosophers, theorists, and psychological scientists, no consensual definition has been achieved. Points of contrast across theories include whether authenticity is a trait or a state, whether it is general or role-specific, the degree to which it encompasses internal experiences and external behaviors, and the extent to...   More >

Henry Mahncke: From PhD to Industry

Colloquium | October 3 | 5:15-6:15 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Department of Psychology

Monday, October 8, 2018

The origins of morality: Developing a society of equals

Colloquium | October 8 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 1102 Berkeley Way West

 Melanie Killen, University of Maryland

 Department of Psychology

Although human societies provide protection from harm and enable the construction of collaborative and mutually beneficial social structures, they also pave the way for social hierarchies that deny equal treatment to certain portions of the population. Developmental science research reveals that children are aware of status and hierarchies, often reject the status quo, and seek to rectify social...   More >

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Sleepless and alone: How does sleep loss affect our social life?

Colloquium | October 10 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Eti Ben Simon, Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Human Sleep Science

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Loneliness is a growing public health epidemic, reliably increasing mortality and morbidity risks in socially isolated individuals. A potential factor linking loneliness to poor health is disturbed sleep. Both lonely individuals as well as socially isolated animals suffer from worse sleep quality compared to socially connected controls. Focusing on the importance of sleep in modulating social...   More >

Book Talk: In Defense of Troublemakers

Reading - Nonfiction | October 10 | 4-5:30 p.m. | Haviland Hall, 227 (Social Research Library)

 Charlan Nemeth

 Library

Author Charlan Nemeth, Professor of Psychology (UC Berkeley), will discuss her book In Defense of Troublemakers: The Power of Dissent in Life and Business (Basic Books, 2018). She will explain why dissent should be cherished, not feared, because it leads to more creative and better decision-making. Lone objectors — from Twelve Angry Men to Edward Snowden — force people to question their...   More >

Fronto-thalamic interaction in cognitive control and flexibility: Michael Halassa, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Colloquium | October 10 | 5:15-6:15 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Michael Halassa, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 Department of Psychology

Monday, October 15, 2018

School-Based Interventions to Improve Developmental Trajectories in Very Young Adolescents

Colloquium | October 15 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 1102 Berkeley Way West

 Erin Murphy Graham, Graduate School of Education; Megan Cherewick, Institute of Human Development; Lucia Magis Weinberg, Institute of Human Development

 Ron Dahl, Institute of Human Development

 Institute of Human Development

Background: In recognition of our broader multi-disciplinary community in BWW (Psychology, Education, Public Health, IHD and IPSR) some of the slots in the 2018-2019 IHD/Developmental Psychology Colloquium will be used for a series of cross-cutting interdisciplinary panel discussions. These panels serve two goals. First, to bring together several disciplinary perspectives to promote a more...   More >

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Clinical Science Colloquium

Colloquium | October 16 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 1102 Berkeley Way West

 Linda M. Isbell, Ph.D.

 Department of Psychology

Title: The Emotional ER: Physician and Nurse Biases Toward Patients with Mental Illness and/or Substance Use Disorders

Abstract:
The Institute of Medicine has recently identified diagnostic error as “the next frontier in patient safety” and has highlighted that every single person is likely to experience at least one diagnostic error in their lifetime. Unfortunately, some patients are at risk...   More >

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Emotionally Unpredictable Leaders Harm Team Performance Because They Create Intra-team Power Struggles

Colloquium | October 17 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Lindred Greer, Associate Professor, Stanford Graduate School of Business

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Prior research demonstrates that the discrete emotional displays of leaders, such as anger and happiness, send social information to followers that helps to direct team members’ focus, understanding of the situation, and motivation, boosting team performance. We argue that a key assumption underlying this research is that leaders’ emotions are informative to followers, sending consistent social...   More >

From Academia to Airbnb: a high dimensional anecdote: Jason Vytlacil

Colloquium | October 17 | 5:15-6:15 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Jason Vytlacil

 Department of Psychology

You can find Jason Vytlacil's LinkedIn page here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jason-vytlacil/

Monday, October 22, 2018

In Remembrance of Diana Baumrind

Memorial | October 22 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | 1102 Berkeley Way West

 Institute of Human Development

To honor the contributions of Diana Baumrind's life work on parenting, Larry Nucci, Phil and Carolyn Cowan, Nadia Sorkhabi, Liz Owens, and Bob Larzelere will briefly present their recent projects in collaboration with Diana.

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

You Want How Much?!: Perceptions of Extreme First Offers and The Men and Women Who Make Them

Colloquium | October 24 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Margaret Lee, Postdoctoral Scholar, Center for Equity, Gender, and Leadership

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Much research has robustly shown that individuals benefit from making a first offer in negotiations and has advocated high offers for sellers and low offers for buyers. However, little research has considered how extreme (unreasonably high for sellers and unreasonably low for buyers) offers, as well as the negotiators who make them, are perceived. Experiment 1 found that, compared to moderate...   More >

Department of Psychology Faculty Research Lecture: The role of self-distancing in enabling adaptive behavior under stress: Implications for emotion regulation and self-control

Colloquium | October 24 | 3 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Ozlem Ayduk, Professor, University of California, Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

This talk will describe a program of research on the emotion regulatory benefits of self-distancing -- the process of transcending one’s egocentric point of view in the here-and-now. I will present data from multiple levels of analyses (e.g., behavioral, neural) using a variety of research designs (i.e., correlational, experimental, longitudinal) that elucidate how and why self-distancing might...   More >

Monday, October 29, 2018

Children Learning to Collaborate: Cultural Paradigms

Colloquium | October 29 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | 1102 Berkeley Way West

 Barbara Rogoff, University of California, Santa Cruz

 Department of Psychology

How do children learn to collaborate with others? In this talk, Barbara Rogoff discusses cultural differences in children's collaboration and in supports for learning to collaborate. She argues that collaboration is a key aspect of a cultural paradigm for learning that is especially prevalent in many Mexican and Indigenous-heritage communities of the Americas, where children have wide opportunity...   More >

Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Opportunities and challenges of high-field fMRI for neuroscience applications

Colloquium | October 31 | 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Kendrick Kay, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

In this talk, Dr. Kendrick Kay will describe two recent projects that exploit functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at ultra-high magnetic field strength (7 Tesla). The first project consisted of whole-brain fMRI retinotopic mapping in 181 healthy adults, as part of the Human Connectome Project (T2*-weighted gradient-echo EPI, 1.6-mm isotropic resolution, 1-s TR, 85 slices, multiband...   More >

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Their pain, our pleasure

Colloquium | November 7 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 Mina Cikara, Assistant Professor, Harvard University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

If humans are innately good, cooperative, fair, and averse to harming one another, why does widespread intergroup conflict persist? Several factors contribute to fomenting hostility between groups; in my talk I will focus on the role of pleasure in response to out-group pain. People who identify strongly with their social groups frequently experience pleasure when they observe threatening...   More >

Friday, November 9, 2018

Attentional Episodes and Cognitive Control

Seminar | November 9 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 1104 Berkeley Way West

 John Duncan, MRC Cognition & Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Abstract: Human fMRI studies show a tightly-localised set of “multiple-demand” or MD regions, involved in solution of many different cognitive challenges, widely separated yet strongly functionally connected, and linked to standard measures of fluid intelligence. Multiple-demand regions are generally associated with “cognitive control”, but how should control be conceived? Using data from...   More >