All events

Upcoming Events

Monday, December 11, 2017

Residential Segregation and its Effects on Intergroup Cognition

Lecture | December 11 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Arianne Eason, University of Washington

 Department of Psychology

In the U.S. today, racial segregation remains rampant in neighborhoods, schools, and even the workplace. Given the persistent inequity in terms of both race and social class in the U.S., my research utilizes perspectives from developmental, social, and cultural psychology to examine how features of our social and cultural contexts (e.g., racially segregated neighborhoods and classrooms) influence...   More >

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Aversion to Emotional Insurance: Costly Reluctance to Hedge Desired Outcomes

Colloquium | January 17 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Carey K. Morewedge, Professor, Boston University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

We examine whether people reduce the impact of negative outcomes through emotional hedging—betting against the occurrence of desired outcomes. We find substantial reluctance to bet against the success of preferred U.S. presidential candidates and Major League Baseball, National Football League, National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) basketball, and NCAA hockey teams. This reluctance is...   More >

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Gender and Race Gatekeeping

Colloquium | January 24 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Michelle "Mikki" Hebl, Professor, Rice University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

In this talk, Mikki will discuss the role of gatekeepers in preventing indviduals, often women and members of underrepresented groups, from attaining their potential. Mikki will review some of her programmatic research on subtle discrimination and will then provide some of her most recent studies and data on gender and race gatekeeping.

Friday, January 26, 2018

“Uncovering Perceptual Priors Using Automated Serial Reproduction Chains”: Psychology 229A

Colloquium | January 26 | 11:10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Thomas Langlois, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Monday, January 29, 2018

I see you: Social gaze as a window of opportunity in early brain development

Colloquium | January 29 | 12:15-1:15 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Ronny Geva, The Gonda Brain Research Center, Bar Ilan University, Israel

 Department of Psychology

Social bonding—including the social learning that underpins the creation of early emotional ties between infants and their caretakers—are among the most fundamental developmental processes for human survival and well-being. Social attention is thought to play a crucial role in these processes, but little is known about the neurodevelopmental mechanisms—particularly regarding the involvement of...   More >

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Where

Colloquium | January 30 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Patrick Cavanagh, Department of Psychology, Glendon College and Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College

 Department of Psychology

How do we know where things are? Recent results indicate that an object’s visual location is constructed at a high level where, critically, an object’s motion is discounted to recover its current location, much like we discount the illumination when we perceive color. As a result we sometimes see a target far from its actual location. These predictions operate differently for eye movements,...   More >

Clinical Science Colloquium

Colloquium | January 30 | 3:40-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3105 Beach Room

 Maria Watson Ph.D

 Department of Psychology

In this talk Maria will present an overview of the clinical treatment (individual and group CBT and Motivational Interviewing) and long-term management (Peer Support and Harm Reduction) of Hoarding Disorders. The focus will be on adapting your evidence-based “tool kit” and treatment goals, to work with these often complex and highly comorbid clients, in real life settings.

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Sensory Integration, Density Estimation, and Information Retention

Seminar | January 31 | 12-1 p.m. | 560 Evans Hall

 Joe Makin, UCSF

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

A common task facing computational scientists and, arguably, the brains of primates more generally is to construct models for data, particularly ones that invoke latent variables. Although it is often natural to identify the latent variables of such a model with the true unobserved variables in the world, the correspondence between the two can be more complicated, as when the former are...   More >

Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right

Colloquium | January 31 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Arlie Hochschild, Professor Emerita, UC Berkeley Department of Sociology

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Arlie Hochschild's latest book, Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right (The New Press, September 2016) focuses on the rise of the American right. Based on intensive interviews of Tea Party enthusiasts in Louisiana, conducted over the last five years and focusing on emotions, Hochschild scales an “empathy wall” to learn how to see, think and feel as they do. What do...   More >

Friday, February 2, 2018

“Why The Mind Evolved: The Evolution Of Navigation”: Psychology 229A

Colloquium | February 2 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Lucia Jacobs, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Monday, February 5, 2018

How adolescents navigate uncertainty, with a little help from their friends

Colloquium | February 5 | 12:10-1:30 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Wouter van den Bos, Center for Adaptive Rationality, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin

 Institute of Human Development

Despite the increased prevalence of adolescent risk-taking behavior in the real world, laboratory evidence of adolescent specific risk taking propensity remains scarce. In contrast with the lab, adolescents in the real world often have only incomplete information about risks. There is currently very little known about how adolescents make decisions under these uncertain conditions. To address...   More >

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Cognitive Adaptations to Harsh Environments

Lecture | February 6 | 10-11:30 a.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Willem Frankenhuis, Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University

 Department of Psychology

Growing up in a harsh environment has a major impact on cognition. People from such environments tend to score lower on a variety of cognitive tests. The predominant view in psychology is, therefore, that chronic exposure to harsh conditions impairs cognition. I have recently challenged this consensus by proposing that harsh environments do not exclusively impair cognition. Rather, people also...   More >

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Racial and political dynamics of an approaching majority-minority United States

Colloquium | February 7 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Jennifer Richeson, Professor, Yale University

 Department of Psychology

Ongoing and projected demographic shifts in the racial composition of the United States have been heralded as necessitating, if not promoting, positive change in the racial dynamics of the nation. Although change in response to this growing diversity is likely, its direction and scope are less clear. In this talk, I will present emerging social-scientific research on the psychological, social,...   More >

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Summer Opportunities Fair

Special Event | February 8 | 2-4 p.m. | Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Pauley Ballroom

 Summer Sessions

Wondering what to do next summer? Visit the Summer Opportunities Fair to learn about exciting summer options for UC Berkeley students, including summer courses, study abroad, student jobs and internships, research, volunteer and service, and more.

Representatives from Berkeley campus units will be tabling with information on their courses and programs.

Friday, February 9, 2018

“Exploring Curiosity in Human and Reinforcement Learning agents”

Colloquium | February 9 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Rachit Dubey, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Even in absence of external rewards, babies and scientists explore the world around them. For this reason, curiosity has long been recognized as a hallmark of human exploration and the essence of science. Despite its importance, we lack even the most basic understanding of the basis, mechanisms, and purpose of curiosity. In this talk, I will provide a brief overview of some of my projects which...   More >

Monday, February 12, 2018

Neural Mechanisms of the Development of Face Perception

Colloquium | February 12 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Kalanit Grill-Spector, Stanford University

 Department of Psychology

How do brain mechanisms develop from childhood to adulthood? There is extensive debate if brain development is due to pruning of excess neurons, synapses, and connections, leading to reduction of responses to irrelevant stimuli, or if development is associated with growth of dendritic arbors, synapses, and myelination leading to increased responses and selectivity to relevant stimuli. Our...   More >

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Intracranial electrophysiology of the human default mode network: Where fMRI got it wrong

Colloquium | February 13 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Josef Parvizi, Department of Neurology, Stanford University

 Department of Psychology

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

45 years of studying stress, social relationships and health: 8 pivotal moments that changed the course of my career

Colloquium | February 14 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Sheldon Cohen, Professor, Carnegie Mellon University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

This talk is a summary of Dr. Cohen’s research over the last 45 years. It is organized by “pivots” – experiences that altered the direction of his work. Work he will discuss includes studies of the effects of environmental noise (traffic and aircraft) on cognition, affect and physiology of elementary school children; of the role of social ties, social supports, and social conflicts in physical...   More >

Friday, February 16, 2018

Representing Linguistic Knowledge With Probabilistic Models

Colloquium | February 16 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Stephan Meylan, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Ph.D. Exit Talk

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: 3rd year talks

Colloquium | February 20 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Paul Krueger, Graduate Student, Psychology Department, UC Berkeley; Maria Eckstein, Graduate Student, Psychology Department, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Clinical Science Colloquium

Colloquium | February 20 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Beach Room 3105

 Professor Michelle G. Craske from UCLA, UCLA

 Department of Psychology

Inhibitory learning and regulation during exposure therapy: from basic science to clinical application

Clinical Science Colloquium

Colloquium | February 20 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Beach Room 3105

 Michelle Craske, Ph.D

 Department of Psychology

The therapeutic strategy of repeated exposure is effective for fears and anxiety disorders, but a substantial number of individuals fail to respond. Translation from the basic science of inhibitory extinction learning and inhibitory regulation offers strategies for increasing response rates to exposure therapy. The underlying theories and evidence for these strategies will be presented, including...   More >

Friday, February 23, 2018

Preschoolers Rationally Use Evidence To Select Causally Relevant Variables.: Psychology 229A

Colloquium | February 23 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Mariel Goddu, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Two 30 minute research talks by current graduate students.

“A Rational Account of Inaccurate Self-Assessment”: Psychology 229A

Colloquium | February 23 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Rachel Jansen, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Two 30 minute research talks by current graduate students.

Monday, February 26, 2018

The Role of Attachment in Perceived Relationships with Deities

Colloquium | February 26 | 12:10-1:20 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Frances Nkara, Psychology Department

 Department of Psychology

Religious believers’ perceived relationships with deities likely promote the pervasiveness of theistic religions, especially if these relationships engender or promise attachment-related “felt security”. Specific expectations and behavior within these perceived relationships might be derived from individual differences in implicit, internal working models or states of mind regarding attachment...   More >

Attachment, Religion, and Spirituality: A Wider View

Colloquium | February 26 | 12:10-1:20 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Pehr Granqvist, Visiting scholar from Stockholm University

 Department of Psychology

I will outline a book on the attachment-religion connection that I am currently composing as a visiting scholar. The book has been contracted with Guilford and has Dist. Prof. Em. Phillip R. Shaver from UC Davis as editor. I will focus the talk on four reasons for choosing “A Wider View” as subtitle. First, I argue that Bowlby restricted attachment theory unnecessarily by insisting that...   More >

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: 3rd year talks

Colloquium | February 27 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Nick Angelides, Graduate Student, Psychology Department, UC Berkeley; Vinitha Rangarajan, Graduate Student, Psychology Department, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Clinical Science Colloquium

Colloquium | February 27 | 3:40-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3105 Beach Room

 Dr. Lonnie Snowden

 Department of Psychology

"By expanding Medicaid, a very large safety net health insurance program, and by including mental health and substance abuse coverage as essential benefits that must be covered at "parity" with other conditions, the Affordable Care Act greatly increased behavioral health treatment possibilities for African Americans and other low income populations. However, despite strong financial incentives to...   More >

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Department of Psychology Colloquium - Reflections on Psychology in Tolman Hall: Departmental Divide, Diversity, and Faculty Celebrations

Colloquium | February 28 | 3:10-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Stephen Glickman; Ervin Hafter; Ann Kring; Donald Riley; Rhona Weinstein; Sheldon Zedeck

 Faculty Lectures Committee, Department of Psychology

We continue with Part 2 of the "History of the Psychology Department" series, focusing on the early years in Tolman Hall (1962-1979). Among the themes to be discussed are the initial dedication of Tolman Hall, the Department's reunification, the initial diversification of the Department to include women and minority faculty, and a review of several key figures. On the eve of our move to...   More >

Friday, March 2, 2018

Determinants and Consequences of the Need for Explanation

Colloquium | March 2 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Emily Liquin, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

30 minute research talk by graduate student

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: 3rd year talks

Colloquium | March 6 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Joe Winer, Graduate Student, Psychology Department, UC Berkeley; Christina Merrick, Graduate Student, Psychology Department, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Excess Baggage: How Physicians' and Patients’ Race-Related Beliefs and Attitudes Affect Racially Discordant Clinical Interactions

Colloquium | March 7 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Louis A. Penner, Professor, Wayne State University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

There are pervasive and persistent disparities in the health of Nonhispanic White Americans and most racial ethnic/minorities; the greatest of these are between Black and White Americans. There are multiple, complex reasons for this but disparities in the quality of healthcare received by Black and by White patients is one well-documented cause. One important aspect of healthcare disparities...   More >

Friday, March 9, 2018

“Leveraging Deep Neural Networks To Study Human Cognition”

Colloquium | March 9 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Joshua Peterson, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Ph.D. Exit Talk

Monday, March 12, 2018

Comparative Neurobiology of Social Bonds - from Rodents to Primates to Humans

Colloquium | March 12 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Karen Bales, Department of Psychology, UC Davis

 Department of Psychology

Social bonds are critical to human health and well-being. However, most of what we know regarding the neurobiology of strong, selective social bonds ("pair-bonds") comes from a socially monogamous rodent, the prairie vole. In my laboratory, we also study a socially monogamous primate, the titi monkey, as a model for the neurobiology of pair bond formation and maintenance. We have characterized...   More >

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

The Persistence of Gender Inequality from Interpersonal and Intergroup Perspectives

Colloquium | March 14 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Laura Kray, Professor, Haas School of Business

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Laura Kray will weigh evidence in support of a popular explanation for women’s lesser outcomes in pay and career advancement—the belief that women are poor advocates for themselves.

Friday, March 16, 2018

The Impact of Mental State Inferences for Legal Outcomes

Colloquium | March 16 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Carly Giffin, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Ph.D. Exit Talk

Misery and Pleasure in the Origins of the Study of Happiness

Colloquium | March 16 | 1:10-2:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Daniel Horowitz, Professor Emeritus, Smith College

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

In December 2017, Oxford University Press published 'Happier? The History of a Cultural Movement That Aspired to Transform America' by Daniel Horowitz, an emeritus professor from Smith College. Focusing on the period from 1940 to 1970, this talk will cover some of the origins of the study of happiness and then go on to suggest some of the key aspects that shaped the field in the last half century.

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Chronic ambulatory brain recording in Parkison's disease using a totally implantable neural interface.

Colloquium | March 20 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Philip Starr, Professor, Department of Neurosurgery, UCSF

 Department of Psychology

Friday, March 30, 2018

The Science and Practice of Resilience

Workshop | March 30 | 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Rick Hanson, Ph.D.

 The Greater Good Science Center

Mental resources like determination, self-worth, and kindness are what make us resilient: able to cope with adversity and push through challenges in the pursuit of opportunities. While resilience helps us recover from loss and trauma, it offers much more than that. True resilience fosters well-being, an underlying sense of happiness, love, and peace. Remarkably, as you internalize experiences of...   More >

 $139-$159

  Buy tickets online

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

“It’s the skin you’re in”: What is this thing called ‘race’ and how does it get into the body?

Colloquium | April 4 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Amani Nuru-Jeter, Associate Professor, UC Berkeley School of Public Health

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

This talk will explore the concept of race and discuss how ontological conceptions of race impact the questions we ask, the nature of our scientific investigations, and the conclusions we draw from scientific evidence. I will discuss racism as a determinant of health and the need for conceptual rigor for advancing the study of race, racism and embodiment in social epidemiology. Drawing on recent...   More >

Friday, April 6, 2018

“Resource-Rational Attention Allocation”

Colloquium | April 6 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Fred Callaway, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

One of two 30 min research talks by graduate students.

Learning High-Level Actions By Minimizing Algorithmic Complexity

Colloquium | April 6 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Sophia Sanborn, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

One of two 30 min research talks by graduate students.

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Computational dysfunctions in anxiety: Failure to differentiate signal from noise

Colloquium | April 10 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Martin Paulus, Scientific Director and President, Laureate Institute for Brain Research

 Department of Psychology

Friday, April 13, 2018

“Searching For Scents: Human And Dog Behavior During Odor Navigation”

Colloquium | April 13 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Judy Jinn, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Ph.D. Exit Talk

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Neural oscillations: What we're doing wrong

Colloquium | April 17 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Brad Voytek, Professor, Department of Cognitive Science, UCSD

 Department of Psychology

Friday, April 20, 2018

“Psychology In The Internet Age: Leveraging Big Data To Evaluate Models Of Cognition”

Colloquium | April 20 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 David Bourgin, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Ph.D. Exit Talk

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquium: Simultaneous representation of sensory and mnemonic information in human visual cortex.

Colloquium | April 24 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 John Serences, Department of Psychology, UCSD

 Department of Psychology

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Lecture by Jason Okonofua, Assistant Professor of Psychology, UC Berkeley

Colloquium | April 25 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues), Wildavsky Conference Room

 Jason Okonofua, Assistant Professor of Psychology, UC Berkeley

 Institute for the Study of Societal Issues

Lecture by Jason Okonofua, Assistant Professor of Psychology, UC Berkeley

More information about this talk to be announced.

Sponsored by the Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, UC Berkeley

Friday, April 27, 2018

Competence, Performance, and Norms for Religious Credence

Colloquium | April 27 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Neil Van Leeuwen, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Hosted by Tania Lombrozo