All events

Upcoming Events

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

The Harm in Harmony: Covert Competition and Ingroup Suspicion in East Asian Cultures

Colloquium | October 18 | 11:10 a.m.-12 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Michael Morris, Professor, Columbia University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

A prominent theme in East-West cultural comparisons is that East Asian social interactions are characterized by harmony. But is this merely the surface? We propose that Easterners compete with ingroup members but tend to do so covertly to avoid risking relationships. Further we propose that, under many conditions, they suspect their peers are up to the same. We investigated this underside of...   More >

Self-Interest versus Other-Focus: Navigating the Self-Other Tradeoff in Interpersonal Relationships

Colloquium | October 18 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Amie Gordon Mullins, Postdoctoral Fellow, UC San Francisco

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Relationships underscore every aspect of our lives, influencing the health and well-being of individuals, groups and organizations. One of the fundamental challenges in interpersonal relationships is balancing self-interest with the needs of another person. In this talk, I draw upon social, personality, and health psychology to investigate the factors that shape this self-other tradeoff with the...   More >

Faculty Research Lecture: Employing an Idiographic Lens: Motivations, Insights, and Early Returns

Lecture | October 18 | 3 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Aaron J. Fisher, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Abstract: My talk will begin with an important but potentially unpleasant comment on correlational research: That decades of work generalizing analyses to the experience or behavior of individuals may be fundamentally flawed. I will support this assertion with data taken from several studies from the U.S. and the Netherlands that demonstrate...   More >

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium: Genetic Approaches to Brain Circuit Mapping and Cell Type Characterization

Colloquium | October 19 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Hongkui Zeng, Allen Institute

 Department of Psychology

Monday, October 23, 2017

Inflammation is a hot mess: Linking early environments with physical and mental health

Colloquium | October 23 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Michelle Byrne, Department of Psychology, University of Oregon

 Department of Psychology

Global disease burden in recent years has shifted from premature death to years lived with disability. Non-communicable, chronic diseases are more responsible for these years lost and cost of health care treatment than any other type of illness or disease. Many of these chronic diseases, such as heart disease, obesity, and depression, have links with chronic inflammation. However, the...   More >

BPG Psych Professor Panel: Decision-making of young adults

Panel Discussion | October 23 | 6 p.m. | 2040 Valley Life Sciences Building

 Serena Chen; Aaron Fisher; Stephen Hinshaw; Ozlem Ayduk

 ASUC (Associated Students of the University of California)

Free food will be provided as well.

Monday, October 30, 2017

Developing a Life History Theory of Mind: Awareness that the Mind Learns from the Past to Imagine the Future

Colloquium | October 30 | 12:10-1:20 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Kristin H. Lagattuta, Department of Psychology and the Center for Mind and Brain at the University of California, Davis

 Department of Psychology

Professor Lagattuta will provide an overview of her research on 4- to 10-year-olds' and adults’ beliefs about whether people generalize from their past social interactions when engaging in episodic future thinking; that is, their awareness that people’s minds draw from prior experiences when imagining what will happen next. Across multiple studies, results reveal significant age-related increases...   More >

The Art of Emotions/Emotions in Art: From the Pixar Film to the Empathetic Museum: Arts + Design Mondays at BAMPFA

Lecture | October 30 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Dacher Keltner, Co-Director of the Greater Good Science Center, Professor, Psychology, UC Berkeley

 Arts + Design

In this talk I will chart the journey that the science of emotion has led me on in collaborations on Pixar's film Inside/Out, Emoji at Facebook, and building emotion into museums on our on line life.

This talk coincides with the Science at Cal weekend, including the Vision + LIght exhibition (Oct 27 & 28), and the 2017 World Conference of Science Journalists taking place in the Bay Area and...   More >

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Climate change advocacy and ad hominem attacks

Colloquium | November 1 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Shahzeen Attari, Assistant Professor, Indiana University Bloomington

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Debates about climate change often involve ad hominem attacks. Each side is accused of insincerity, of merely serving special interests. In particular, those who advocate policies to promote energy conservation or otherwise reduce CO2 emissions can be challenged if their personal energy use appears to be high. Our studies indicate that an attack based on high personal carbon footprint can be...   More >

Thursday, November 2, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium: Data Slam 2

Colloquium | November 2 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Department of Psychology

Data slam number 2 from grads in Cognitive Neuroscience/Neuroscience. Grad lounge afterwards for drinks and socializing.

Monday, November 6, 2017

Longitudinal Dynamic Models for Examining the Development of Fluid Reasoning

Colloquium | November 6 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Emilio Ferrer, Department of Psychology, UC Davis

 Department of Psychology

In this presentation I discuss structural equation modeling as a framework for examining developmental processes. First, I present some principles of longitudinal research that underlie both study designs and statistical models for longitudinal data. I then describe models that focus on mechanisms of within-person change, and demonstrate their use for examining developmental processes. I...   More >

What kinds of models are most powerful for supporting science learning?: Models that integrate mechanism

Colloquium | November 6 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2515 Tolman Hall

 Christian Schunn, University of Pittsburgh

 Graduate School of Education

In science, models often serve as the bridge between empirical and theoretical, what was found and what is thought to be. Mathematical and computational transformations often play a central, but perhaps partially hidden, role in this bridge. These mathematical transformations can be approached in very transactional terms, necessary evils of little theoretical value to conceptual reasoning. Or the...   More >

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

The Gardener and the Carpenter: What the New Science of Child Development Tells Us About the Relationship Between Parents and Children: Townsend Book Chat with Alison Gopnik

Lecture | November 8 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Alison Gopnik argues that the familiar 21st century picture of parents and children is profoundly wrong—it's not just based on bad science, it's bad for kids and parents, too.

Experience Effects: How Personal Lifetime Experiences Affect Financial Investment and Risk Attitudes

Colloquium | November 8 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Ulrike Malmendier, Professor, Haas School of Business

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Malmendier’s area of focus is the intersection of economics and finance, and why and how individuals make decisions—specifically how individuals make mistakes and systematically biased decisions. Some of her work includes research on CEO overconfidence, the long-term frugality of Depression “babies” and the decision-making behind gym membership.

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Developing Outreach Activities to Highlight Your Research: Why should science outreach be an essential component of research labs and scientist training?

Workshop | November 9 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 375 LeConte Hall

 

Kate Spohr, Professor, Dept. of Psychology, Coalition for Education and Outreach

 David Whitney, Professor, Dept. of Psychology; Brian Wang, PhD student, Sarpong Lab, Dept. of Chemistry

 Traci Grzymala, Community Resources for Science

 Coalition for Education and Outreach (CEO)

Why should science outreach be an essential component of research labs and scientist training? In this session, we focus on how to develop an effective and engaging outreach activity that incorporates the focal research of your lab group or program.

Monday, November 13, 2017

Preschoolers rationally use evidence to select causally relevant variables

Colloquium | November 13 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Mariel Goddu, Department of Psychology

 Department of Psychology

Young children are powerful causal learners: they readily track statistical contingencies between causes and effects, and they can use this evidence to infer general rules for a system (e.g., red blocks, but not blue blocks, will cause this machine to play music). However, little is known about the ways in which children 1.) transfer the causal rules they form in one context to produce new...   More >

Beyond the First: Healing and Harmful Speech

Panel Discussion | November 13 | 4-6 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Booth Auditorium

 Robert Levenson, Professor, Psychology; Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton, Associate Professor, Psychology and Associate Dean for Diversity, Letters & Science; Geoffrey Nunberg, Adjunct Professor, School of Information; Victoria Plaut, Professor, Law and Social Science

 Eva Paterson, President and Co-Founder, Equal Justice Society and Berkeley Law Class of 1975

 Office of the Chancellor

The next faculty forum in the free speech series will explore the impacts of speech on the mind, body, and soul. Hosted by Chancellor Carol T. Christ.

 Please bring campus or other picture ID to verify your affiliation. Doors will open at 3:30. Seating is limited.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

From Egosystem to Ecosystem: Motivations of the Self in Social Relationships

Colloquium | November 15 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Jennifer Crocker, Professor, Ohio State University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

I propose that in their social interactions, people may be energized by egosystem motivation in which they are preoccupied with proving their own worth and value to themselves and others, or by ecosystem motivation in which they strive to be constructive and supportive of people and things they care about beyond themselves. These two motivational systems, I suggest, are scaffolded onto evolved...   More >

Monday, November 27, 2017

The Acquisition and the Consequences of Gender Stereotypes about Intellectual Ability

Lecture | November 27 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Lin Bian, Stanford University

 Department of Psychology

Intellectual giftedness is culturally associated with men rather than women. I will describe a line of research that investigates the acquisition and the consequences of this “brilliance = men” stereotype. With respect to acquisition, I will present evidence that, by the age of 6, girls are already less likely than boys to believe that members of their gender are “really, really smart.” Next, I...   More >

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Grappling with goodness in infancy and childhood

Lecture | November 29 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Arber Tasimi, Stanford University

 Department of Psychology

A fundamental question in cognitive science is how people weight and integrate competing considerations when deciding how to act. One of the most important everyday arenas of such conflict is the clash between moral considerations and self-interest––the familiar tension between wanting to do good and wanting to do well. In this talk, I will explore how children's judgments and memories reflect an...   More >

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium: Information Seeking and Randomization in Human Exploration and Exploitation

Colloquium | November 30 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Bob Wilson, University of Arizona

 Department of Psychology

Book Talk Series: Another Kind of Madness: A Journey Through the Stigma and Hope of Mental Illness

Reading - Nonfiction | November 30 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 227 Haviland Hall

 Stephen Hinshaw

 Library

Stephen Hinshaw, professor of Psychology (UC Berkeley) and Psychiatry (UC San Francisco) will discuss his newest book, "Another Kind of Madness", chronicling his father’s recurring mental illness and the doctor-enforced silence surrounding it, plus the crucial need to combat stigma. Books will be for sale, courtesy of Mrs. Dalloway's.

*The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible,...   More >

Monday, December 4, 2017

The ontogeny of human ultra-sociality: Concern for social evaluation and social comparison

Lecture | December 4 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Jan Engelmann, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany

 Department of Psychology

Humans’ ultra-social lifeways are based on some species-unique social skills and motivations that develop mostly in early childhood. In this talk, I explore two of these: concern for social evaluation and social comparison. First is the way that young children come to self-regulate their actions not just individually, as do many species, but also socially, as they become concerned for how others...   More >

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Research on Policing: Bias, Discretion, and Policy

Colloquium | December 6 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Jack Glaser, Professor, Goldman School of Public Policy

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Jack Glaser will describe the research he and his colleagues are conducting on racial bias in policing. This will include discussion of the relevant psychological research that helps to explain how racial discrimination occurs and analysis of policing data elucidating racial disparities. Glaser will discuss his efforts with the Center for Policing Equity to build the National Justice Database,...   More >

Infants' Understanding and Evaluation of Shared Social Behavior

Lecture | December 6 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Lindsey Powell, MIT

 Department of Psychology

Shared behaviors are woven throughout human social life. In the course of interaction, social partners mimic one another and align their actions to help or cooperate with one another. Over longer timescales, group members share social and communicative conventions and learn cultural skills from one another. What is the developmental pathway through which infants come to understand and engage in...   More >

Monday, December 11, 2017

Residential Segregation and its Effects on Intergroup Cognition

Lecture | December 11 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Arianne Eason, University of Washington

 Department of Psychology

In the U.S. today, racial segregation remains rampant in neighborhoods, schools, and even the workplace. Given the persistent inequity in terms of both race and social class in the U.S., my research utilizes perspectives from developmental, social, and cultural psychology to examine how features of our social and cultural contexts (e.g., racially segregated neighborhoods and classrooms) influence...   More >

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Gender and Race Gatekeeping

Colloquium | January 24 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Michelle "Mikki" Hebl, Professor, Rice University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

In this talk, Mikki will discuss the role of gatekeepers in preventing indviduals, often women and members of underrepresented groups, from attaining their potential. Mikki will review some of her programmatic research on subtle discrimination and will then provide some of her most recent studies and data on gender and race gatekeeping.