All events

Upcoming Events

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium

Colloquium | September 14 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Tor D. Wager, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and the Institute of Cognitive Science, The University of Boulder.

 Department of Psychology

Recent years have seen dramatic advancement in the measurement of biology at a systems level. Researchers routinely obtain thousands or millions of simultaneous measures of dynamic systems. In humans, this includes neuroimaging, which can be used to probe the brain bases of affect and emotion in increasingly sophisticated ways. Neuroimaging can provide measures of activity in 300,000 brain...   More >

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Clinical Science Psychology Students 3rd Yr Talk

Colloquium | September 19 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3105 Beach Room

 Department of Psychology

Caitlin Gasperetti
Talk: Characterizing Sleep in Evening-Type Adolescents

Niki Gumport
Talk: Patient Learning of Treatment Contents in Cognitive Therapy

Enitan Marcelle
Talk: Prenatal Predictors of Working Memory Functioning in ADHD

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Inspiration in the writer-reader encounter: Creativity, transmission, contagion, and personality similarity

Colloquium | September 20 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Todd Thrash, Professor, College of William & Mary

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Inspiration is a motivational state in which an individual feels compelled to transmit, actualize, or express ideas. In this colloquium I present a series of studies of the role of inspiration in the writer-reader encounter. Key findings include the following: (a) Writer inspiration predicts the creativity of the resulting text, whereas writer effort tends to be a poor predictor. (b) Inspiration...   More >

Monday, September 25, 2017

Remembering in the Toddler Years

Colloquium | September 25 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Simona Ghetti, UC Davis Center for Mind and Brain

 Department of Psychology

The ability to subjectively re-experience our past requires processes that develop substantially during the course of childhood. Children ought to be able form, retain and retrieve detailed memory representations. In addition, they ought to be able to reflect on the quality of these memory representations (e.g., whether they are certain versus uncertain; whether the memories include vivid detail)...   More >

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Faculty Research Lecture: Computational Approaches to Human Affective Neuroscience

Lecture | September 27 | 3 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Sonia Bishop, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Abstract: Computational modelling allows us to move beyond simple approaches to experimental design. Here, I will present two very different examples of integrating computational modelling into human affective neuroscience. In the first example, we sought to better characterize the mechanisms underlying intolerance of uncertainty in anxiety. Participants performed bandit style decision-making...   More >

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Nature and nurture in neurocognitive development: insights from studies of plasticity in blindness

Colloquium | September 28 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Marina Bedny, Johns Hopkins University

 Department of Psychology

The human cortex consists of distinct networks that support cognitive functions such as language processing, face perception, and motor control. How do intrinsic physiology and experience determine this specialization? Studies of sensory loss provide unique insights into this question. In individuals who are blind from birth so called “visual” cortices acquire responses to sound and touch....   More >

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium

Colloquium | September 28 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Marina Bedny, Johns Hopkins University

 Department of Psychology

Nature and nurture in neurocognitive development: Insights from studies of plasticity in blindness.

Monday, October 2, 2017

Executive Functioning in Children and Their Caregivers: Implications for Adaptation and Resilience

Colloquium | October 2 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Jelena Obradović, Graduate School of Education, Stanford University

 Department of Psychology

Children who know how to control their impulses, ignore distracting stimuli, manipulate information in the mind, and shift between competing rules tend to thrive in life. Professor Obradović will discuss how good self-regulation skills help children succeed in the school context and review her new research linking executive functioning, stress physiology, and parenting practices. She will...   More >

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Clinical Science Psychology Students 3rd Yr Talk

Colloquium | October 3 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Beach Room 3105

 Department of Psychology

Ben Swerdlow
Talk Title: Toxic Side Effects of Interpersonal Emotion Regulation?: Focus on Shame

Jennifer Pearlstein
Talk Title: Mechanisms of Impulsive Reactions to Emotion: How Stress Impacts the Ability to Override Emotional Impulses 

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

The Self in Social Inference: Antecedents and Consequences of Perspective Taking

Colloquium | October 4 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Andrew Todd, Assistant Professor, UC Davis

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

The ability to intuit what other people are thinking and feeling with some degree of accuracy is essential for effective communication and social coordination, making it important to understand both the factors that give rise to and the consequences that follow from perspective taking. In this talk, I’ll provide an overview of a program of research that examines the role of the self as an...   More >

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium: Data Slam 1

Colloquium | October 5 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Ye Xia, Whitney lab; Carson McNeil, Gallant lab; Darius Parvin, Ivry lab; Maria Eckstein, Collins lab; Kata Slama, Knight lab; Dan Lurie, D'Esposito lab

 Department of Psychology

Data slam from grads in Cognitive Neuroscience/Neuroscience. Grad lounge afterwards for pingpong/foosball plus drinks and pizza.

Monday, October 9, 2017

Understanding Probability

Colloquium | October 9 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Shaun O'Grady, Dept. of Psychology

 Department of Psychology

What is the mental representation of probability and how does it develop? What role do education and experience play in understanding probability? In this talk I will present the results of 4 Experiments investigating probability judgments in children and adults. In the first part of the discussion I will present data from adult participants performing a ratio comparison task as well as a...   More >

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

How social and personality psychologists can be assets to assessment and selection teams at Google

Panel Discussion | October 11 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Dana Landis, Head of Leadership Assessment and Effectiveness, Google; Maria Arboleda, Scaled Assessments Manager - Hiring Innovation, Google

 Curtis Malik Boykin, Doctoral Candidate, Institute of Personality and Social Research

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Drs. Maria Arboleda (Scaled Assessments Manager - Hiring Innovation) and Dana Landis (Head of Leadership Assessment and Effectiveness) will address a series of applied methods, training, and career focused questions crowd-sourced from Social-Personality Area graduate students.

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

The Harm in Harmony: Covert Competition and Ingroup Suspicion in East Asian Cultures

Colloquium | October 18 | 11:10 a.m.-12 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Michael Morris, Professor, Columbia University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

A prominent theme in East-West cultural comparisons is that East Asian social interactions are characterized by harmony. But is this merely the surface? We propose that Easterners compete with ingroup members but tend to do so covertly to avoid risking relationships. Further we propose that, under many conditions, they suspect their peers are up to the same. We investigated this underside of...   More >

Self-Interest versus Other-Focus: Navigating the Self-Other Tradeoff in Interpersonal Relationships

Colloquium | October 18 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Amie Gordon Mullins, Postdoctoral Fellow, UC San Francisco

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Relationships underscore every aspect of our lives, influencing the health and well-being of individuals, groups and organizations. One of the fundamental challenges in interpersonal relationships is balancing self-interest with the needs of another person. In this talk, I draw upon social, personality, and health psychology to investigate the factors that shape this self-other tradeoff with the...   More >

Faculty Research Lecture: Employing an Idiographic Lens: Motivations, Insights, and Early Returns

Lecture | October 18 | 3 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Aaron J. Fisher, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Abstract: My talk will begin with an important but potentially unpleasant comment on correlational research: That decades of work generalizing analyses to the experience or behavior of individuals may be fundamentally flawed. I will support this assertion with data taken from several studies from the U.S. and the Netherlands that demonstrate...   More >

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium: Genetic Approaches to Brain Circuit Mapping and Cell Type Characterization

Colloquium | October 19 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Hongkui Zeng, Allen Institute

 Department of Psychology

Monday, October 23, 2017

Inflammation is a hot mess: Linking early environments with physical and mental health

Colloquium | October 23 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Michelle Byrne, Department of Psychology, University of Oregon

 Department of Psychology

Global disease burden in recent years has shifted from premature death to years lived with disability. Non-communicable, chronic diseases are more responsible for these years lost and cost of health care treatment than any other type of illness or disease. Many of these chronic diseases, such as heart disease, obesity, and depression, have links with chronic inflammation. However, the...   More >

BPG Psych Professor Panel: Decision-making of young adults

Panel Discussion | October 23 | 6 p.m. | 2040 Valley Life Sciences Building

 Serena Chen; Aaron Fisher; Stephen Hinshaw; Ozlem Ayduk

 ASUC (Associated Students of the University of California)

Free food will be provided as well.

Monday, October 30, 2017

Developing a Life History Theory of Mind: Awareness that the Mind Learns from the Past to Imagine the Future

Colloquium | October 30 | 12:10-1:20 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Kristin H. Lagattuta, Department of Psychology and the Center for Mind and Brain at the University of California, Davis

 Department of Psychology

Professor Lagattuta will provide an overview of her research on 4- to 10-year-olds' and adults’ beliefs about whether people generalize from their past social interactions when engaging in episodic future thinking; that is, their awareness that people’s minds draw from prior experiences when imagining what will happen next. Across multiple studies, results reveal significant age-related increases...   More >

The Art of Emotions/Emotions in Art: From the Pixar Film to the Empathetic Museum: Arts + Design Mondays at BAMPFA

Lecture | October 30 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Dacher Keltner, Co-Director of the Greater Good Science Center, Professor, Psychology, UC Berkeley

 Arts + Design

In this talk I will chart the journey that the science of emotion has led me on in collaborations on Pixar's film Inside/Out, Emoji at Facebook, and building emotion into museums on our on line life.

This talk coincides with the Science at Cal weekend, including the Vision + LIght exhibition (Oct 27 & 28), and the 2017 World Conference of Science Journalists taking place in the Bay Area and...   More >

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Climate change advocacy and ad hominem attacks

Colloquium | November 1 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Shahzeen Attari, Assistant Professor, Indiana University Bloomington

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Debates about climate change often involve ad hominem attacks. Each side is accused of insincerity, of merely serving special interests. In particular, those who advocate policies to promote energy conservation or otherwise reduce CO2 emissions can be challenged if their personal energy use appears to be high. Our studies indicate that an attack based on high personal carbon footprint can be...   More >

Thursday, November 2, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium: Data Slam 2

Colloquium | November 2 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Department of Psychology

Data slam number 2 from grads in Cognitive Neuroscience/Neuroscience. Grad lounge afterwards for drinks and socializing.

Monday, November 6, 2017

Longitudinal Dynamic Models for Examining the Development of Fluid Reasoning

Colloquium | November 6 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Emilio Ferrer, Department of Psychology, UC Davis

 Department of Psychology

In this presentation I discuss structural equation modeling as a framework for examining developmental processes. First, I present some principles of longitudinal research that underlie both study designs and statistical models for longitudinal data. I then describe models that focus on mechanisms of within-person change, and demonstrate their use for examining developmental processes. I...   More >

What kinds of models are most powerful for supporting science learning?: Models that integrate mechanism

Colloquium | November 6 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2515 Tolman Hall

 Christian Schunn, University of Pittsburgh

 Graduate School of Education

In science, models often serve as the bridge between empirical and theoretical, what was found and what is thought to be. Mathematical and computational transformations often play a central, but perhaps partially hidden, role in this bridge. These mathematical transformations can be approached in very transactional terms, necessary evils of little theoretical value to conceptual reasoning. Or the...   More >

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

The Gardener and the Carpenter: What the New Science of Child Development Tells Us About the Relationship Between Parents and Children: Townsend Book Chat with Alison Gopnik

Lecture | November 8 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Alison Gopnik argues that the familiar 21st century picture of parents and children is profoundly wrong—it's not just based on bad science, it's bad for kids and parents, too.

Experience Effects: How Personal Lifetime Experiences Affect Financial Investment and Risk Attitudes

Colloquium | November 8 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Ulrike Malmendier, Professor, Haas School of Business

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Malmendier’s area of focus is the intersection of economics and finance, and why and how individuals make decisions—specifically how individuals make mistakes and systematically biased decisions. Some of her work includes research on CEO overconfidence, the long-term frugality of Depression “babies” and the decision-making behind gym membership.

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Developing Outreach Activities to Highlight Your Research: Why should science outreach be an essential component of research labs and scientist training?

Workshop | November 9 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 375 LeConte Hall

 

Kate Spohr, Professor, Dept. of Psychology, Coalition for Education and Outreach

 David Whitney, Professor, Dept. of Psychology; Brian Wang, PhD student, Sarpong Lab, Dept. of Chemistry

 Traci Grzymala, Community Resources for Science

 Coalition for Education and Outreach (CEO)

Why should science outreach be an essential component of research labs and scientist training? In this session, we focus on how to develop an effective and engaging outreach activity that incorporates the focal research of your lab group or program.

Monday, November 13, 2017

Preschoolers rationally use evidence to select causally relevant variables

Colloquium | November 13 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Mariel Goddu, Department of Psychology

 Department of Psychology

Young children are powerful causal learners: they readily track statistical contingencies between causes and effects, and they can use this evidence to infer general rules for a system (e.g., red blocks, but not blue blocks, will cause this machine to play music). However, little is known about the ways in which children 1.) transfer the causal rules they form in one context to produce new...   More >

Beyond the First: Healing and Harmful Speech

Panel Discussion | November 13 | 4-6 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Booth Auditorium

 Robert Levenson, Professor, Psychology; Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton, Associate Professor, Psychology and Associate Dean for Diversity, Letters & Science; Geoffrey Nunberg, Adjunct Professor, School of Information; Victoria Plaut, Professor, Law and Social Science

 Eva Paterson, President and Co-Founder, Equal Justice Society and Berkeley Law Class of 1975

 Office of the Chancellor

The next faculty forum in the free speech series will explore the impacts of speech on the mind, body, and soul. Hosted by Chancellor Carol T. Christ.

 Please bring campus or other picture ID to verify your affiliation. Doors will open at 3:30. Seating is limited.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

From Egosystem to Ecosystem: Motivations of the Self in Social Relationships

Colloquium | November 15 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Jennifer Crocker, Professor, Ohio State University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

I propose that in their social interactions, people may be energized by egosystem motivation in which they are preoccupied with proving their own worth and value to themselves and others, or by ecosystem motivation in which they strive to be constructive and supportive of people and things they care about beyond themselves. These two motivational systems, I suggest, are scaffolded onto evolved...   More >

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Book Talk Series: Another Kind of Madness: A Journey Through the Stigma and Hope of Mental Illness

Reading - Nonfiction | November 30 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 227 Haviland Hall

 Stephen Hinshaw

 Library

Stephen Hinshaw, professor of Psychology (UC Berkeley) and Psychiatry (UC San Francisco) will discuss his newest book, "Another Kind of Madness", chronicling his father’s recurring mental illness and the doctor-enforced silence surrounding it, plus the crucial need to combat stigma. Books will be for sale, courtesy of Mrs. Dalloway's.

*The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible,...   More >