All events

Upcoming Events

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

The neuroscience of cognitive development and mathematics skill acquisition

Lecture | March 21 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Torkel Klingberg

 Department of Psychology

Professor Torkel Klingberg from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden will be giving a lecture in the Cognitive Neuroscience colloquium series in Psychology.

Food Politics and the Twenty-First Century Food Movement: Barbara Weinstock Lectures on the Morals of Trade by Marion Nestle

Lecture | March 21 | 4:10 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Dr. Marion Nestle, Paulette Goddard Professor of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health, New York University

 Graduate Division, Berkeley Food Institute

Marion Nestle will present the Weinstock lecture on March 21, 2017. Her lecture is titled "Food Politics and the Twenty-First Century Food Movement" and is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

Marion Nestle

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

The Neuroscience of Social Emotions and Cognition: From Ontogeny to Plasticity

Colloquium | March 22 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Tania Singer, Professor and Director, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

The social neurosciences have focused on the question of how people relate to and understand each other. Researchers have distinguished between at least two different routes on the understanding of others: one affective-motivational route referring to our ability to feel with (empathy) and for (compassion) another person, and a cognitive route allowing to infer other people's intentions, beliefs,...   More >

Friday, March 24, 2017

Formats for thinking

Seminar | March 24 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Elisabeth Camp, Rutgers University

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Many philosophers, logicians and psychologists assume an exhaustive and exclusive dichotomy between "imagistic", iconic, or pictorial representations and "discursive", logical, or propositional ones. Others dismiss the distinction as meaningless, on the ground that any content can be captured in propositional terms. Adherents of both positions often conclude that thought -- at least, cognition of...   More >

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Reprogramming the Brain to Health Symposium: Brain Training to Promote Brain Health

Conference/Symposium | March 29 | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Mark D'Espostio, UC Berkeley; Dan Krawcyzk, UT Dallas; Tony Chen, UCSF; Ian Robertson, UT Dallas; Michael Merzenich, UCSF; Adam Gazzaley, UCSF; Sandra Chapman, UT Dallas

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

This symposium will bring together the most distinguished brain scientists to share and learn up-to-date breakthroughs in brain research.

  RSVP by emailing ucbbraintrainingsymposium@gmail.com by March 28.

Saturday, April 1, 2017

Michael Pollan and Simon Sadler in Conversation

Lecture | April 1 | 1 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

Journalist and best-selling author Michael Pollan is joined by noted architectural and urban historian Simon Sadler to discuss the history and new use of psychedelics for therapeutic purposes, the subject of Pollan’s new book and an area illuminated by Sadler’s investigation of the philosophy he calls “hippie holism.” The conversation also touches on the counterculture pursuit of “evolved...   More >

 Free for BAMPFA members, UC Berkeley students, faculty, staff, retirees; 18 & under + guardian | $10 Non-UC Berkeley students, 65+, disabled persons | $12 General admission

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

"Digital Doomsday: A Perspective from the Pathology Called Europe," Jan De Vos

Lecture | April 4 | 5-6 p.m. | Moffitt Undergraduate Library, 340, BCNM Commons

 Jan De Vos

 Berkeley Center for New Media

Allegedly, no reflection, knowledge nor theory are needed in the business of shaping the onlife self – let the data, algorithms and bots do the work!

In this talk probe the pitfalls that theory and criticism should avoid in this era of the digitalization of (inter)subjectivity. I argue that a critical history of digitalization needs in the first place a critical history of subjectivity. I go...   More >

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Deception and Trust in a Post-Truth World

Colloquium | April 5 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall | Canceled

 Jeff Hancock, Professor, Stanford University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

How is the rewiring of communication in the network age changing how we deceive and trust one another? How can we trust that news story, or a hotel’s online review, or that text message about someone being on their way? In this talk we’ll go over how principles from psychology and communication intersect deception and trust with technology. We’ll cover the state-of-the-art in deception detection...   More >

Stereotype Threat and Identity Threat: The Science of A Diverse Community: The why, what, and how of making diverse learning communities effective for all.

Panel Discussion | April 5 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 245 Li Ka Shing Center

 Dr. Claude Steele, University of California, Berkeley

 Dr. Waldo Martin, Jr., University of California, Berkeley; Dr. Eva Nogales, University of California, Berkeley

 Division of Biological Sciences

Please join us for an important discussion on Stereotype and Identity Threat led by Professor Claude Steele of Psychology, followed by a panel discussion with Professor Waldo Martin, Jr. of American History and Citizenship and Professor Eva Nogales of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Structural Biology.

This event is sponsored by the Division of Biological Sciences, who welcomes the campus...   More >

 

  Registration opens March 16. Register online by March 29.

Friday, April 7, 2017

Counterfactual thinking and comparative similarity

Seminar | April 7 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Felipe de Brigard, Duke University

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Counterfactual thinking involves imagining hypothetical alternatives to reality. Philosopher David Lewis argued that people estimate the subjective plausibility that a counterfactual event could have occurred by comparing an imagined possible world in which the counterfactual statement is true against the current, actual world in which the counterfactual statement is false. Accordingly,...   More >

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquia

Colloquium | April 11 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Vincent P. Clark, University of New Mexico

 Department of Psychology

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Does Poverty Lower Productivity? Evidence on the Cognitive Effects of Financial Constraints

Colloquium | April 12 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2538 Channing (Inst. for the Study of Societal Issues), Wildavsky Conference Room

 Supreet Kaur, Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, UC Berkeley

 Institute for the Study of Societal Issues

Recent work at the intersection of psychology and economics posits that the condition of being financially constrained induces cognitive load, leading to potentially lower cognitive function among the poor. If true, this has the potential to lower labor productivity among the poor—providing a channel through which poverty could directly reinforce itself.

Friday, April 14, 2017

Cognition Colloquium: Emily Liquin "The Effects of Explanation Generation on Explore-Exploit Decision Making and Learning"& Sophia Sanborn "TBA"

Colloquium | April 14 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Room 5101

 Emily Liquin, UC Berkeley; Sophia Sanborn, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Grad student Emily Liquin will present her research, "The Effects of Explanation Generation on Explore-Exploit Decision Making and Learning," and grad student Sophia Sanborn will present some of her original research, topic TBA.

Monday, April 17, 2017

Data-Driven Personalized Therapy for Mood and Anxiety by Aaron Fisher Ph.D.

Colloquium | April 17 | 12-1 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Warner Brown Rm 3201

 Aaron Fisher

 Department of Psychology

The current talk will discuss methods for applying precision medicine concepts to behavioral data and cognitive-behavioral interventions. I will discuss data collection, analysis, and application methodologies for understanding individual psychopathologies. To this end I will discuss methods for identifying the symptoms and behaviors that make the greatest contribution to the structure and...   More >

Hidden Hearing Loss: Synaptopathy in noise-induced and age related cochlear damage: Berkeley Ear Club

Colloquium | April 17 | 4 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Beach Room 3105

 Charles Liberman, Mass Eye & Ear Eaton Peabody Lab Boston

 Department of Psychology

The classic view of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is that the “primary” targets are hair cells, and that cochlear-nerve loss is “secondary” to hair cell degeneration. Our recent work in mouse and guinea pig has challenged that view. In noise-induced hearing loss, exposures causing only reversible threshold shifts (and no hair cell loss) nevertheless cause permanent loss of >50% of...   More >

Cultural Criticism in the Age of YouTube: Tiffany Shlain and Rolla Selbak, moderated by George Strompolos

Lecture | April 17 | 6:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Townsend Center for the Humanities, Arts + Design

Tiffany Shlain is a filmmaker, founder of the Webby Awards, and co-founder of the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences. Rolla Selbak is writer and director of the film Three Veils; creator of the web series Kiss Her I’m Famous and Grrl’s Guide to Filmmaking. George Strompolos is founder and CEO of the YouTube network Fullscreen

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Teaching and Research Resource Fair: AIS-palooza

Special Event | April 18 | 11 a.m.-1 p.m. | 117 Dwinelle Hall

 Academic Innovation Studio, Educational Technology Services, Center for Teaching and Learning, Library, Research IT, bConnected

Enjoy technology demonstrations and mini-sessions on connecting teaching and research, creating instructional videos, (re-)energizing your course, bringing social justice into the classroom, promoting your research, sharing and using open educational resources, securing your data, and much more!

The future of fMRI in cognitive neuroscience

Lecture | April 18 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Professor Russell Poldrack, Stanford University

 Department of Psychology

Professor Russ Poldrack from the Department of Psychology at Stanford University will speak in the Cognitive Neuroscience colloquium series.

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquia

Colloquium | April 18 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Russ Poldrack, Stanford University

 Department of Psychology

Speaking Amongst Ourselves: Democracy and Law: Tanner Lectures on Human Values by Seana Valentine Shiffrin

Lecture | April 18 | 4:10-6:15 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Seana Valentine Shiffrin, Professor of Philosophy, Pete Kameron Professor of Law and Social Justice, University of California, Los Angeles

 University of California, Berkeley

Seana Valentine Shiffrin will present a three day lecture series with commentary by Niko Kolodny, Richard R.W. Brooks, and Anna B. Stilz. This event will be held on April 18, 19, & 20, 2017. The first day's lecture is titled "Democratic Law." The second day's lecture is titled "Common and Constitutional Law: A Democratic Legal Perspective." Free and open to public. No tickets required.

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Power Analysis and Meta-Analysis are Falsely Reassuring Solutions for Concerns about Statistical Power

Colloquium | April 19 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Leif Nelson, Professor, Haas School of Business

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Transparency, disclosure, and preregistration have revealed that some statistically underpowered studies may be propped up by selective reporting and p-hacking. Conscientious researchers therefore have renewed investment in statistical power. One approach is to conduct traditional power analysis to correctly set the sample size. I argue that this tool is not helpful and often biased toward...   More >

Insights for Relationships and Health from Latino and East Asian Cultures: Equity and Inclusion Lecture

Colloquium | April 19 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Belinda Campos, PhD, UC Irvine

 Department of Psychology

Social relationships can enhance the quality of life by conferring higher levels of subjective well-being, greater resilience against adverse circumstances, and better health. To obtain these benefits, humans must navigate a complex social world where self-interest must be balanced by other-interest. In this talk, I will present a series of studies that show that Latino and East Asian cultural...   More >

Speaking Amongst Ourselves: Democracy and Law: Tanner Lectures on Human Values by Seana Valentine Shiffrin

Lecture | April 19 | 4:10-6:15 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Seana Valentine Shiffrin, Professor of Philosophy, Pete Kameron Professor of Law and Social Justice, University of California, Los Angeles

 University of California, Berkeley

Seana Valentine Shiffrin will present a three day lecture series with commentary by Niko Kolodny, Richard R.W. Brooks, and Anna B. Stilz. This event will be held on April 18, 19, & 20, 2017. The first day's lecture is titled "Democratic Law." The second day's lecture is titled "Common and Constitutional Law: A Democratic Legal Perspective." Free and open to public. No tickets required.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Speaking Amongst Ourselves: Democracy and Law: Tanner Lectures on Human Values by Seana Valentine Shiffrin

Lecture | April 20 | 4:10-6:30 p.m. | Alumni House, Toll Room

 Seana Valentine Shiffrin, Professor of Philosophy, Pete Kameron Professor of Law and Social Justice, University of California, Los Angeles

 University of California, Berkeley

Seana Valentine Shiffrin will present a three day lecture series with commentary by Niko Kolodny, Richard R.W. Brooks, and Anna B. Stilz. This event will be held on April 18, 19, & 20, 2017. The first day's lecture is titled "Democratic Law." The second day's lecture is titled "Common and Constitutional Law: A Democratic Legal Perspective." Free and open to public. No tickets required.

Friday, April 21, 2017

Objectivity and Trained Judgment: Toward an ethnography of experimental psychology

Seminar | April 21 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Emily Martin, New York University

 Neuroscience Institute, Helen Wills

Historians of psychology have described how the "introspection" of early Wundtian psychology largely came to be ruled out of experimental psychology settings by the mid-20th century. In this talk I will take a fresh look at the years before this process was complete -- from the vantage point of early ethnographic and psychological field expeditions and from observing several current psychology...   More >

Monday, April 24, 2017

Radio, Podcast, and Contemporary Cultural Criticism: John Horn and Glynn Washington, moderated by Chloe Veltman

Lecture | April 24 | 6:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Townsend Center for the Humanities, Arts + Design

John Horn is host of KPCC’s The Frame, a daily arts and entertainment program. Glynn Washington is host and executive producer of Snap Judgment on National Public Radio. Chloe Veltman is senior arts editor at KQED.

Friday, April 28, 2017

Cognition Colloquium: Tracking early vocabulary development with smartphones

Colloquium | April 28 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Stephan Meylan, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Our own Stephan Meylan will present his work on, "Tracking early vocabulary development with smartphones."

Saturday, April 29, 2017

California Cognitive Science Conference

Conference/Symposium | April 29 |  Li Ka Shing Center

 Office of Undergraduate Research

The Cognitive Science Student Association is pleased to host the ninth annual California Cognitive Science Conference (CCSC) held in April at UC Berkeley. The theme for CCSC 2017 is Mistakes. We will be exploring this exciting topic through the lenses of psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, anthropology, computer science, philosophy and more.

The CCSC is an annual all-day symposium bringing...   More >

The Science of Burnout: What Is It, Why It Happens, and How to Avoid It

Seminar | April 29 | 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | International House, Chevron Auditorium

 Joan Halifax, Upaya Zen Center; Christina Maslach, UC Berkeley; Elizabeth Bromley, UCLA

 Emiliana Simion-Thomas, UC Berkeley

 Greater Good Science Center

At this day-long seminar, led by GGSC Science Director Emiliana Simon-Thomas, Ph.D.--with special guests celebrated compassion teacher Joan Halifax, Ph.D., burnout expert Christina Maslach, Ph.D., and UCLA psychiatrist Elizabeth Bromley, M.D., Ph.D.--you’ll explore the characteristics of burnout, its negative consequences, and the individual and organizational factors that make it more or less...   More >

 $159

  Tickets go on sale January 25. Buy tickets by emailing eliseproulx@berkeley.edu

Monday, May 1, 2017

The Future of Media in the Trump Era: Dave Pell, moderated by Deirdre English

Lecture | May 1 | 6:30 p.m. | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Osher Theater

 Townsend Center for the Humanities, Arts + Design

Dave Pell is the founder and editor of NextDraft, a curated compilation of daily news and analysis. Deirdre English is former editor-in-chief of Mother Jones magazine.

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Teaching in Summer Workshop

Workshop | May 2 | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. | 442 Stephens Hall

 Jake Grumbach, AC Faculty Member, Political Science; John Stehlin, AC Faculty Member, Geography

 American Cultures

The American Cultures (AC) Center extends an invitation to all summer to attend our ‘Teaching in Summer’ workshop. Although this workshop will discuss the opportunities and obstacles of teaching AC courses, in particular, we will also spend significant time discussing general approaches to teaching courses in the summer, and therefore want to extend this invitation to all who might find value in...   More >

 

  Registration opens February 28. Register online by April 25.

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Two axes of subordination: How immigration shapes racial dynamics in the U.S.

Colloquium | May 3 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Sapna Cheryan, Associate Professor, University of Washington

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

The study of racial prejudice in psychology developed primarily based on research studying African Americans and Whites. The recent precipitated growth of Latinos and Asian Americans in the United States underscores the need for a framework that integrates more groups.

The current work proposes that racial and ethnic minority groups are disadvantaged along two distinct dimensions of perceived...   More >

My Love Affair with the Brain: May Movie at Moffitt

Film - Documentary | May 3 | 7-9 p.m. | 405 Moffitt Undergraduate Library

 Library

Spend Wednesday evening of RRR week learning more about your brain, and how it can thrive! This delightful documentary follows renowned brain scientist and UC Berkeley professor emerita of anatomy, Dr. Marian Diamond, introducing us to her groundbreaking accomplishments at a time when so few women entered her field, as well as her entertaining teaching style and charming personality.

 Must have a UCB student ID for entrance.

poster

Thursday, May 4, 2017

Post-Baccalaureate Program for Counseling and Psychology Professions Online Information Session

Information Session | May 4 | 12-1 p.m. |  Online

 UC Berkeley Extension

Whether you are a career changer or already working in the field, understand how this program can help you plan an academic program of study and initiate the graduate- school application process.

 

  Make reservations online

Social Science Matrix Open House: A Gathering and Celebration

Reception | May 4 | 4-6 p.m. | Barrows Hall, 820 Barrows Hall

 Social Science Matrix

Please join us on May 4th, 2017 between 4pm-6pm for a celebration of a successful year at Social Science Matrix, UC Berkeley's hub for cross-disciplinary social-science research.

Invite your friends colleagues to come to our Open House, where you can:

- Enjoy food and drink while learning about the programs and events offered by Social Science Matrix.

-...   More >

 Please RSVP if you plan to attend.

 

  RSVP online by May 3.

Social Science Matrix

Friday, May 5, 2017

Cognition Colloquium: David Bourgin, "Putting the “me” back in recommendation: A comparative study of recommendation models from computer science and cognitive psychology"

Colloquium | May 5 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Room 5101

 David Bourgin, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Grad student David Bourgin will present some of his original research, "Putting the “me” back in recommendation: A comparative study of recommendation models from computer science and cognitive psychology."

Monday, May 8, 2017

Spatial release from masking and the precedence effect in asymmetric hearing loss: Berkeley Ear Club

Colloquium | May 8 | 4 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Beach Room 3105

 Richard Freyman, Communication Disorders U Mass. Amhearst

 Department of Psychology

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquia

Career Fair | May 9 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Max Bertolero

 Department of Psychology

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Selective Attention in the Service of Reinforcement Learning: 2017 Ghiselli Lecture

Lecture | May 10 | 3 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Professor Yael Niv, Princeton University

 Department of Psychology

On the face of it, most real-world world tasks are hopelessly complex from the point of view of reinforcement learning mechanisms. In particular, due to the "curse of dimensionality", even the simple task of crossing the street should, in principle, take thousands of trials to learn to master. But we are better than that.. How does our brain do it? In this talk I will argue that the limited...   More >

Friday, May 12, 2017

Departmental Poster Day: Featuring current research in Psychology

Presentation | May 12 | 11 a.m.-1 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 2301 and 2304

 Silvia Bunge

 Department of Psychology

2nd-year graduate students and Honor's undergraduate students in Psychology will present their research. Whether you're a student, a professor, a postdoc, a lab manager, or a staff member, stop by to learn about current research in the department. Snacks and beverages will be provided.

Sunday, May 14, 2017

Happy Hour: Ryûsuke Hamaguchi, 2015 (317 Minutes) In Japanese with English subtitles – Free and Open to the Public

Film - Feature | May 14 | 12:30-6:30 p.m. | 142 Dwinelle Hall

 Ryûsuke Hamaguchi, Director and Filmmaker

 Film & Media Studies

Ryûsuke Hamaguchi's "Happy Hour" (2015) is a seemingly picturesque melodrama about four women living in Kobe who quietly drift apart. The shadow of the 3/11 Earthquake, however, falls over the surface of the acclaimed and award-winning 317 minute epic. Director Q+A to follow.

Saturday, May 20, 2017

Science at Cal Lecture - Why we sleep

Lecture | May 20 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building

 Matthew Walker, Sleep and Neuroimaging Laboratory

 Science@Cal

Allow me to ask you a question: Can you recall the last time you woke up without an alarm clock feeling refreshed, not needing caffeine? If the answer is “no,” you are not alone. Two-thirds of adults fail to obtain the recommended 8 hours of nightly sleep. I doubt you are surprised by the answer to this question, but you may be surprised by the consequences. Routinely sleeping less than 6 or 7...   More >

Why we sleep

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Behavioral Health Sciences Department Information Session

Information Session | May 23 | 6-7:30 p.m. | 205 UC Berkeley Extension (Golden Bear Center)

 Stan Weisner

 UC Berkeley Extension

UC Berkeley Extension's Behavioral Health Sciences Department offers a wide array of professional and post-baccalaureate certificate programs intended for both professionals and paraprofessionals interested in the fields of health and mental health. Learn about the Post-Baccalaureate Program for Counseling and Psychology Professions, Certificate Program in Alcohol and Drug Abuse Studies,...   More >

  Make reservations online

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Russell De Valois Memorial Lecture Series

Lecture | June 1 | 4-5 p.m. | 489 Minor Hall

 William T. Newsome, PhD, Harman Family Provostial Professor, Vincent V.C. Woo Director of the Stanford Neurosciences Institute

 Department of Psychology

Monitoring Covert Visual Decisions via Neural Population Dynamics in Frontal Cortex

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

The neural substrates of anxious temperament in non-human primates

Colloquium | August 23 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Andrew Fox, Assistant Professor, UC Davis

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

An extremely anxious temperament early in life is a risk factor for the later development of anxiety, depressive, and substance abuse disorders. Children with an extremely anxious temperament (AT), react to novelty with increased behavioral inhibition and increased levels of physiological arousal. Using a well-validated non-human primate model of AT, our group has been investigating the...   More >

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

The Psychology of Brokerage

Colloquium | August 30 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Nir Halevy, Associate Professor, Stanford University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Third parties often shape dyadic interactions and relationships. Building on interdependence theory as an organizing conceptual framework, the current research explores when, why, and how third parties intervene in others' interactions, and illuminates previously unidentified similarities and differences between distinct types of third party influence.

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

The Vicarious Construal Effect: Seeing and Experiencing the World Through Different Eyes

Colloquium | September 6 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Clayton Critcher, Associate Professor, Haas School of Business

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

That two individuals can be exposed to the same stimulus and experience it differently speaks to the power of construal. People’s construals are shaped by their idiosyncratic attitudes, belief systems, and personal histories. As a result, simple delights for children often become uninspiring bores for adults. In this talk, I consider whether people can actively try on construals and experience...   More >

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium

Colloquium | September 7 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Joni Wallis, Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute and Department of Psychology, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

"Dynamics of Prefrontal Computations During Decision-Making"

Monday, September 11, 2017

Moving towards a more cumulative research practice in developmental psychology

Colloquium | September 11 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Michael Frank, Stanford University

 Department of Psychology

In recent years, many psychologists have become increasingly concerned about issues of reproducibility and replicability. From small sample sizes to post-hoc analytic flexibility ("p-hacking"), many factors conspire to decrease the robustness and trustworthiness of results in published research. These problems are important in developmental psychology as well, though the scope of the problem is...   More >

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Clinical Science Psychology Students 3rd Yr Talk

Colloquium | September 12 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3105 Beach RM

 Department of Psychology

Allison Diamond

Title: "Tell me how will you’ll really feel: An idiographic approach to future affect predictions in dysphoric and healthy individuals"

Alice Hua

Title: A new window into caregiver health: Using the patient brain as a predictor

Where Compassion Meets Social Justice: Cultivating Social, Emotional, and Moral Learning in the Schools

Panel Discussion | September 12 | 4-6 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall | Note change in time

 Dr. Luigina Mortari, Chair, Department of Human Sciences, University of Verona, Italy; Dr. Brooke Lavelle, Co-Founder and President, Courage of Care Coalition; Dr. Valerie Shapiro, Co-Director Center for Prevention Research and Assistant Professor, School of Social Welfare, UC Berkeley

 Graduate School of Education

Schools have become increasingly involved in cultivating students' capacities for reasoning about equity and justice as well as demonstrating compassion and care. Three distinguished panelists actively engaged in relevant pedagogical approaches will help us think about what works and why.

Where Compassion Meets Social Justice: Cultivating Social, Emotional, and Moral Learning in the Schools

Panel Discussion | September 12 | 4-6 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall | Note change in time

 Dr. Luigina Mortari, Chair, Department of Human Sciences, University of Verona, Italy; Dr. Brooke Lavelle, Co-Founder and President, Courage of Care Coalition; Dr. Valerie Shapiro, Co-Director Center for Prevention Research and Assistant Professor, School of Social Welfare, UC Berkeley

 Graduate School of Education

Schools have become increasingly involved in cultivating students' capacities for reasoning about equity and justice as well as demonstrating compassion and care. Three distinguished panelists actively engaged in relevant pedagogical approaches will help us think about what works and why.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Information Seeding and Knowledge Production in Online Communities: Evidence from OpenStreetMap

Colloquium | September 13 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Abhishek Nagaraj, Assistnat Professor, Haas School of Business

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Does seeding online communities with baseline information spur contributor activity and follow-on knowledge production? I shed light on this question by examining data from OpenStreetMap, a Wikipedia-style, digital map-making community that was seeded by the US Census TIGER map at its inception. I estimate the causal effects of information seeding on OpenStreetMap by leveraging a novel dataset of...   More >

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium

Colloquium | September 14 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Tor D. Wager, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and the Institute of Cognitive Science, The University of Boulder.

 Department of Psychology

Recent years have seen dramatic advancement in the measurement of biology at a systems level. Researchers routinely obtain thousands or millions of simultaneous measures of dynamic systems. In humans, this includes neuroimaging, which can be used to probe the brain bases of affect and emotion in increasingly sophisticated ways. Neuroimaging can provide measures of activity in 300,000 brain...   More >

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Clinical Science Psychology Students 3rd Yr Talk

Colloquium | September 19 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, 3105 Beach Room

 Department of Psychology

Caitlin Gasperetti
Talk: Characterizing Sleep in Evening-Type Adolescents

Niki Gumport
Talk: Patient Learning of Treatment Contents in Cognitive Therapy

Enitan Marcelle
Talk: Prenatal Predictors of Working Memory Functioning in ADHD

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Inspiration in the writer-reader encounter: Creativity, transmission, contagion, and personality similarity

Colloquium | September 20 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Todd Thrash, Professor, College of William & Mary

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Inspiration is a motivational state in which an individual feels compelled to transmit, actualize, or express ideas. In this colloquium I present a series of studies of the role of inspiration in the writer-reader encounter. Key findings include the following: (a) Writer inspiration predicts the creativity of the resulting text, whereas writer effort tends to be a poor predictor. (b) Inspiration...   More >

Monday, September 25, 2017

Remembering in the Toddler Years

Colloquium | September 25 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Simona Ghetti, UC Davis Center for Mind and Brain

 Department of Psychology

The ability to subjectively re-experience our past requires processes that develop substantially during the course of childhood. Children ought to be able form, retain and retrieve detailed memory representations. In addition, they ought to be able to reflect on the quality of these memory representations (e.g., whether they are certain versus uncertain; whether the memories include vivid detail)...   More >

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Faculty Research Lecture: Computational Approaches to Human Affective Neuroscience

Lecture | September 27 | 3 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Sonia Bishop, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Abstract: Computational modelling allows us to move beyond simple approaches to experimental design. Here, I will present two very different examples of integrating computational modelling into human affective neuroscience. In the first example, we sought to better characterize the mechanisms underlying intolerance of uncertainty in anxiety. Participants performed bandit style decision-making...   More >

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Nature and nurture in neurocognitive development: insights from studies of plasticity in blindness

Colloquium | September 28 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Marina Bedny, Johns Hopkins University

 Department of Psychology

The human cortex consists of distinct networks that support cognitive functions such as language processing, face perception, and motor control. How do intrinsic physiology and experience determine this specialization? Studies of sensory loss provide unique insights into this question. In individuals who are blind from birth so called “visual” cortices acquire responses to sound and touch....   More >

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium

Colloquium | September 28 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Marina Bedny, Johns Hopkins University

 Department of Psychology

Nature and nurture in neurocognitive development: Insights from studies of plasticity in blindness.

Monday, October 2, 2017

Executive Functioning in Children and Their Caregivers: Implications for Adaptation and Resilience

Colloquium | October 2 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Jelena Obradović, Graduate School of Education, Stanford University

 Department of Psychology

Children who know how to control their impulses, ignore distracting stimuli, manipulate information in the mind, and shift between competing rules tend to thrive in life. Professor Obradović will discuss how good self-regulation skills help children succeed in the school context and review her new research linking executive functioning, stress physiology, and parenting practices. She will...   More >

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Clinical Science Psychology Students 3rd Yr Talk

Colloquium | October 3 | 3:30-5 p.m. | Tolman Hall, Beach Room 3105

 Department of Psychology

Ben Swerdlow
Talk Title: Toxic Side Effects of Interpersonal Emotion Regulation?: Focus on Shame

Jennifer Pearlstein
Talk Title: Mechanisms of Impulsive Reactions to Emotion: How Stress Impacts the Ability to Override Emotional Impulses 

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

The Self in Social Inference: Antecedents and Consequences of Perspective Taking

Colloquium | October 4 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Andrew Todd, Assistant Professor, UC Davis

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

The ability to intuit what other people are thinking and feeling with some degree of accuracy is essential for effective communication and social coordination, making it important to understand both the factors that give rise to and the consequences that follow from perspective taking. In this talk, I’ll provide an overview of a program of research that examines the role of the self as an...   More >

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium: Data Slam 1

Colloquium | October 5 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Ye Xia, Whitney lab; Carson McNeil, Gallant lab; Darius Parvin, Ivry lab; Maria Eckstein, Collins lab; Kata Slama, Knight lab; Dan Lurie, D'Esposito lab

 Department of Psychology

Data slam from grads in Cognitive Neuroscience/Neuroscience. Grad lounge afterwards for pingpong/foosball plus drinks and pizza.

Monday, October 9, 2017

Understanding Probability

Colloquium | October 9 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Shaun O'Grady, Dept. of Psychology

 Department of Psychology

What is the mental representation of probability and how does it develop? What role do education and experience play in understanding probability? In this talk I will present the results of 4 Experiments investigating probability judgments in children and adults. In the first part of the discussion I will present data from adult participants performing a ratio comparison task as well as a...   More >

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

How social and personality psychologists can be assets to assessment and selection teams at Google

Panel Discussion | October 11 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Dana Landis, Head of Leadership Assessment and Effectiveness, Google; Maria Arboleda, Scaled Assessments Manager - Hiring Innovation, Google

 Curtis Malik Boykin, Doctoral Candidate, Institute of Personality and Social Research

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Drs. Maria Arboleda (Scaled Assessments Manager - Hiring Innovation) and Dana Landis (Head of Leadership Assessment and Effectiveness) will address a series of applied methods, training, and career focused questions crowd-sourced from Social-Personality Area graduate students.

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

The Harm in Harmony: Covert Competition and Ingroup Suspicion in East Asian Cultures

Colloquium | October 18 | 11:10 a.m.-12 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Michael Morris, Professor, Columbia University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

A prominent theme in East-West cultural comparisons is that East Asian social interactions are characterized by harmony. But is this merely the surface? We propose that Easterners compete with ingroup members but tend to do so covertly to avoid risking relationships. Further we propose that, under many conditions, they suspect their peers are up to the same. We investigated this underside of...   More >

Self-Interest versus Other-Focus: Navigating the Self-Other Tradeoff in Interpersonal Relationships

Colloquium | October 18 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Amie Gordon Mullins, Postdoctoral Fellow, UC San Francisco

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Relationships underscore every aspect of our lives, influencing the health and well-being of individuals, groups and organizations. One of the fundamental challenges in interpersonal relationships is balancing self-interest with the needs of another person. In this talk, I draw upon social, personality, and health psychology to investigate the factors that shape this self-other tradeoff with the...   More >

Faculty Research Lecture: Employing an Idiographic Lens: Motivations, Insights, and Early Returns

Lecture | October 18 | 3 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Aaron J. Fisher, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology, UC Berkeley

 Department of Psychology

Abstract: My talk will begin with an important but potentially unpleasant comment on correlational research: That decades of work generalizing analyses to the experience or behavior of individuals may be fundamentally flawed. I will support this assertion with data taken from several studies from the U.S. and the Netherlands that demonstrate...   More >

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium: Genetic Approaches to Brain Circuit Mapping and Cell Type Characterization

Colloquium | October 19 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Hongkui Zeng, Allen Institute

 Department of Psychology

Monday, October 23, 2017

Inflammation is a hot mess: Linking early environments with physical and mental health

Colloquium | October 23 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Michelle Byrne, Department of Psychology, University of Oregon

 Department of Psychology

Global disease burden in recent years has shifted from premature death to years lived with disability. Non-communicable, chronic diseases are more responsible for these years lost and cost of health care treatment than any other type of illness or disease. Many of these chronic diseases, such as heart disease, obesity, and depression, have links with chronic inflammation. However, the...   More >

BPG Psych Professor Panel: Decision-making of young adults

Panel Discussion | October 23 | 6 p.m. | 2040 Valley Life Sciences Building

 Serena Chen; Aaron Fisher; Stephen Hinshaw; Ozlem Ayduk

 ASUC (Associated Students of the University of California)

Free food will be provided as well.

Monday, October 30, 2017

Developing a Life History Theory of Mind: Awareness that the Mind Learns from the Past to Imagine the Future

Colloquium | October 30 | 12:10-1:20 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Kristin H. Lagattuta, Department of Psychology and the Center for Mind and Brain at the University of California, Davis

 Department of Psychology

Professor Lagattuta will provide an overview of her research on 4- to 10-year-olds' and adults’ beliefs about whether people generalize from their past social interactions when engaging in episodic future thinking; that is, their awareness that people’s minds draw from prior experiences when imagining what will happen next. Across multiple studies, results reveal significant age-related increases...   More >

The Art of Emotions/Emotions in Art: From the Pixar Film to the Empathetic Museum: Arts + Design Mondays at BAMPFA

Lecture | October 30 | 6:30-8 p.m. |  Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

 Dacher Keltner, Co-Director of the Greater Good Science Center, Professor, Psychology, UC Berkeley

 Arts + Design

In this talk I will chart the journey that the science of emotion has led me on in collaborations on Pixar's film Inside/Out, Emoji at Facebook, and building emotion into museums on our on line life.

This talk coincides with the Science at Cal weekend, including the Vision + LIght exhibition (Oct 27 & 28), and the 2017 World Conference of Science Journalists taking place in the Bay Area and...   More >

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Climate change advocacy and ad hominem attacks

Colloquium | November 1 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Shahzeen Attari, Assistant Professor, Indiana University Bloomington

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Debates about climate change often involve ad hominem attacks. Each side is accused of insincerity, of merely serving special interests. In particular, those who advocate policies to promote energy conservation or otherwise reduce CO2 emissions can be challenged if their personal energy use appears to be high. Our studies indicate that an attack based on high personal carbon footprint can be...   More >

Thursday, November 2, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium: Data Slam 2

Colloquium | November 2 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Department of Psychology

Data slam number 2 from grads in Cognitive Neuroscience/Neuroscience. Grad lounge afterwards for drinks and socializing.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

The Gardener and the Carpenter: What the New Science of Child Development Tells Us About the Relationship Between Parents and Children: Townsend Book Chat with Alison Gopnik

Lecture | November 8 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Alison Gopnik argues that the familiar 21st century picture of parents and children is profoundly wrong—it's not just based on bad science, it's bad for kids and parents, too.

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Developing Outreach Activities to Highlight Your Research: Why should science outreach be an essential component of research labs and scientist training?

Workshop | November 9 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 375 LeConte Hall

 

Kate Spohr, Professor, Dept. of Psychology, Coalition for Education and Outreach

 David Whitney, Professor, Dept. of Psychology; Brian Wang, PhD student, Sarpong Lab, Dept. of Chemistry

 Traci Grzymala, Community Resources for Science

 Coalition for Education and Outreach (CEO)

Why should science outreach be an essential component of research labs and scientist training? In this session, we focus on how to develop an effective and engaging outreach activity that incorporates the focal research of your lab group or program.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

From Egosystem to Ecosystem: Motivations of the Self in Social Relationships

Colloquium | November 15 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Jennifer Crocker, Professor, Ohio State University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

I propose that in their social interactions, people may be energized by egosystem motivation in which they are preoccupied with proving their own worth and value to themselves and others, or by ecosystem motivation in which they strive to be constructive and supportive of people and things they care about beyond themselves. These two motivational systems, I suggest, are scaffolded onto evolved...   More >

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Book Talk Series: Another Kind of Madness: A Journey Through the Stigma and Hope of Mental Illness

Reading - Nonfiction | November 30 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 227 Haviland Hall

 Stephen Hinshaw

 Library

Stephen Hinshaw, professor of Psychology (UC Berkeley) and Psychiatry (UC San Francisco) will discuss his newest book, "Another Kind of Madness", chronicling his father’s recurring mental illness and the doctor-enforced silence surrounding it, plus the crucial need to combat stigma. Books will be for sale, courtesy of Mrs. Dalloway's.

*The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible,...   More >