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<< December 2017 >>

Monday, December 4, 2017

The ontogeny of human ultra-sociality: Concern for social evaluation and social comparison

Lecture | December 4 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Jan Engelmann, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany

 Department of Psychology

Humans’ ultra-social lifeways are based on some species-unique social skills and motivations that develop mostly in early childhood. In this talk, I explore two of these: concern for social evaluation and social comparison. First is the way that young children come to self-regulate their actions not just individually, as do many species, but also socially, as they become concerned for how others...   More >

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Research on Policing: Bias, Discretion, and Policy

Colloquium | December 6 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Jack Glaser, Professor, Goldman School of Public Policy

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Jack Glaser will describe the research he and his colleagues are conducting on racial bias in policing. This will include discussion of the relevant psychological research that helps to explain how racial discrimination occurs and analysis of policing data elucidating racial disparities. Glaser will discuss his efforts with the Center for Policing Equity to build the National Justice Database,...   More >

Infants' Understanding and Evaluation of Shared Social Behavior

Lecture | December 6 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Lindsey Powell, MIT

 Department of Psychology

Shared behaviors are woven throughout human social life. In the course of interaction, social partners mimic one another and align their actions to help or cooperate with one another. Over longer timescales, group members share social and communicative conventions and learn cultural skills from one another. What is the developmental pathway through which infants come to understand and engage in...   More >

Monday, December 11, 2017

Residential Segregation and its Effects on Intergroup Cognition

Lecture | December 11 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Arianne Eason, University of Washington

 Department of Psychology

In the U.S. today, racial segregation remains rampant in neighborhoods, schools, and even the workplace. Given the persistent inequity in terms of both race and social class in the U.S., my research utilizes perspectives from developmental, social, and cultural psychology to examine how features of our social and cultural contexts (e.g., racially segregated neighborhoods and classrooms) influence...   More >