All events

<< November 2017 >>

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Climate change advocacy and ad hominem attacks

Colloquium | November 1 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Shahzeen Attari, Assistant Professor, Indiana University Bloomington

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Debates about climate change often involve ad hominem attacks. Each side is accused of insincerity, of merely serving special interests. In particular, those who advocate policies to promote energy conservation or otherwise reduce CO2 emissions can be challenged if their personal energy use appears to be high. Our studies indicate that an attack based on high personal carbon footprint can be...   More >

Thursday, November 2, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium: Data Slam 2

Colloquium | November 2 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Department of Psychology

Data slam number 2 from grads in Cognitive Neuroscience/Neuroscience. Grad lounge afterwards for drinks and socializing.

Monday, November 6, 2017

Longitudinal Dynamic Models for Examining the Development of Fluid Reasoning

Colloquium | November 6 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Emilio Ferrer, Department of Psychology, UC Davis

 Department of Psychology

In this presentation I discuss structural equation modeling as a framework for examining developmental processes. First, I present some principles of longitudinal research that underlie both study designs and statistical models for longitudinal data. I then describe models that focus on mechanisms of within-person change, and demonstrate their use for examining developmental processes. I...   More >

What kinds of models are most powerful for supporting science learning?: Models that integrate mechanism

Colloquium | November 6 | 4-5:30 p.m. | 2515 Tolman Hall

 Christian Schunn, University of Pittsburgh

 Graduate School of Education

In science, models often serve as the bridge between empirical and theoretical, what was found and what is thought to be. Mathematical and computational transformations often play a central, but perhaps partially hidden, role in this bridge. These mathematical transformations can be approached in very transactional terms, necessary evils of little theoretical value to conceptual reasoning. Or the...   More >

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

The Gardener and the Carpenter: What the New Science of Child Development Tells Us About the Relationship Between Parents and Children: Townsend Book Chat with Alison Gopnik

Lecture | November 8 | 12-1 p.m. | Stephens Hall, Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

 Townsend Center for the Humanities

Alison Gopnik argues that the familiar 21st century picture of parents and children is profoundly wrong—it's not just based on bad science, it's bad for kids and parents, too.

Experience Effects: How Personal Lifetime Experiences Affect Financial Investment and Risk Attitudes

Colloquium | November 8 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Ulrike Malmendier, Professor, Haas School of Business

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

Malmendier’s area of focus is the intersection of economics and finance, and why and how individuals make decisions—specifically how individuals make mistakes and systematically biased decisions. Some of her work includes research on CEO overconfidence, the long-term frugality of Depression “babies” and the decision-making behind gym membership.

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Developing Outreach Activities to Highlight Your Research: Why should science outreach be an essential component of research labs and scientist training?

Workshop | November 9 | 12-1:30 p.m. | 375 LeConte Hall

 

Kate Spohr, Professor, Dept. of Psychology, Coalition for Education and Outreach

 David Whitney, Professor, Dept. of Psychology; Brian Wang, PhD student, Sarpong Lab, Dept. of Chemistry

 Traci Grzymala, Community Resources for Science

 Coalition for Education and Outreach (CEO)

Why should science outreach be an essential component of research labs and scientist training? In this session, we focus on how to develop an effective and engaging outreach activity that incorporates the focal research of your lab group or program.

Monday, November 13, 2017

Preschoolers rationally use evidence to select causally relevant variables

Colloquium | November 13 | 12:10-1:10 p.m. | 3105 Tolman Hall

 Mariel Goddu, Department of Psychology

 Department of Psychology

Young children are powerful causal learners: they readily track statistical contingencies between causes and effects, and they can use this evidence to infer general rules for a system (e.g., red blocks, but not blue blocks, will cause this machine to play music). However, little is known about the ways in which children 1.) transfer the causal rules they form in one context to produce new...   More >

Beyond the First: Healing and Harmful Speech

Panel Discussion | November 13 | 4-6 p.m. | Boalt Hall, School of Law, Booth Auditorium

 Robert Levenson, Professor, Psychology; Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton, Associate Professor, Psychology and Associate Dean for Diversity, Letters & Science; Geoffrey Nunberg, Adjunct Professor, School of Information; Victoria Plaut, Professor, Law and Social Science

 Eva Paterson, President and Co-Founder, Equal Justice Society and Berkeley Law Class of 1975

 Office of the Chancellor

The next faculty forum in the free speech series will explore the impacts of speech on the mind, body, and soul. Hosted by Chancellor Carol T. Christ.

 Please bring campus or other picture ID to verify your affiliation. Doors will open at 3:30. Seating is limited.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

From Egosystem to Ecosystem: Motivations of the Self in Social Relationships

Colloquium | November 15 | 12:10-1:15 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Jennifer Crocker, Professor, Ohio State University

 Institute of Personality and Social Research

I propose that in their social interactions, people may be energized by egosystem motivation in which they are preoccupied with proving their own worth and value to themselves and others, or by ecosystem motivation in which they strive to be constructive and supportive of people and things they care about beyond themselves. These two motivational systems, I suggest, are scaffolded onto evolved...   More >

Monday, November 27, 2017

The Acquisition and the Consequences of Gender Stereotypes about Intellectual Ability

Lecture | November 27 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Lin Bian, Stanford University

 Department of Psychology

Intellectual giftedness is culturally associated with men rather than women. I will describe a line of research that investigates the acquisition and the consequences of this “brilliance = men” stereotype. With respect to acquisition, I will present evidence that, by the age of 6, girls are already less likely than boys to believe that members of their gender are “really, really smart.” Next, I...   More >

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Grappling with goodness in infancy and childhood

Lecture | November 29 | 3-4:30 p.m. | 5101 Tolman Hall

 Arber Tasimi, Stanford University

 Department of Psychology

A fundamental question in cognitive science is how people weight and integrate competing considerations when deciding how to act. One of the most important everyday arenas of such conflict is the clash between moral considerations and self-interest––the familiar tension between wanting to do good and wanting to do well. In this talk, I will explore how children's judgments and memories reflect an...   More >

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Cognitive Neuroscience/Neurobiology Colloquium: Information Seeking and Randomization in Human Exploration and Exploitation

Colloquium | November 30 | 3:30-5 p.m. | 101 Life Sciences Addition

 Bob Wilson, University of Arizona

 Department of Psychology

Book Talk Series: Another Kind of Madness: A Journey Through the Stigma and Hope of Mental Illness

Reading - Nonfiction | November 30 | 4:10-5:30 p.m. | 227 Haviland Hall

 Stephen Hinshaw

 Library

Stephen Hinshaw, professor of Psychology (UC Berkeley) and Psychiatry (UC San Francisco) will discuss his newest book, "Another Kind of Madness", chronicling his father’s recurring mental illness and the doctor-enforced silence surrounding it, plus the crucial need to combat stigma. Books will be for sale, courtesy of Mrs. Dalloway's.

*The Library attempts to offer programs in accessible,...   More >