Skip to main content.
Advanced search >
Print

<< October 2012 >>

Friday, October 5, 2012

Physics Graduate Student Social Hour

Social Event | August 28, 2009 – December 28, 2012 every Friday | 5-7 p.m. | LeConte Hall, 375 - Helmholz Room


Graduate Assembly


Graduate students, staff, and faculty from any department are invited to this weekly event held by the Physics Graduate Student Association as a forum for informal networking and communication between scientists and science enthusiasts from all career levels. Come by for a relaxing atmosphere with delicious refreshments usually sponsored by the GA.

Monday, October 8, 2012

Training Spin for Substance Detection

Colloquium | October 8 | 4:15-5:30 p.m. | LeConte Hall, Room #1


Karen Sauer, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University

Department of Physics


I will discuss how to manipulate the nuclear spin in the sample to extend the signal’s duration and the atomic spin in the magnetometer to quicken the magnetometer’s response time.


Faculty, Students - Graduate

All Audiences

Friday, October 12, 2012

Physics Graduate Student Social Hour

Social Event | August 28, 2009 – December 28, 2012 every Friday | 5-7 p.m. | LeConte Hall, 375 - Helmholz Room


Graduate Assembly


Graduate students, staff, and faculty from any department are invited to this weekly event held by the Physics Graduate Student Association as a forum for informal networking and communication between scientists and science enthusiasts from all career levels. Come by for a relaxing atmosphere with delicious refreshments usually sponsored by the GA.

Monday, October 15, 2012

Neutrino Quantum Spookiness: Collapsing Stars, Supernovae, and the Cosmos

Colloquium | October 15 | 4:15-5:30 p.m. | LeConte Hall, Room #1


George Fuller, Professor of Astrophysics, Director, Center for Astrophysics & Space Sciences, UC San Diego

Department of Physics


Collapsing stellar cores and the early universe are fantastic engines for generating neutrinos, ghostlike particles which interact with matter only through the aptly named weak interaction and gravitation. However, neutrinos can more than make up for these feeble interactions with huge numbers


Students - Graduate, Students - Undergraduate

Friday, October 19, 2012

Physics Graduate Student Social Hour

Social Event | August 28, 2009 – December 28, 2012 every Friday | 5-7 p.m. | LeConte Hall, 375 - Helmholz Room


Graduate Assembly


Graduate students, staff, and faculty from any department are invited to this weekly event held by the Physics Graduate Student Association as a forum for informal networking and communication between scientists and science enthusiasts from all career levels. Come by for a relaxing atmosphere with delicious refreshments usually sponsored by the GA.

Monday, October 22, 2012

Nonlinear Stochastic Dynamics Of Biochemical Systems: Phase Transition, Thermodynamics And Analytical Mechanics

Colloquium | October 22 | 4:15-5:30 p.m. | LeConte Hall, Room #1


Hong Qian, Professor of Applied Mathematics Adjunct in Bioengineering, University of Washington

Department of Physics


Using chemical species inside a small aqueous volume (a cell) as an example, we introduce Delbruck-Gillespie birth-and-death process for chemical reactions dynamics.


Faculty, Students - Graduate, Students - Undergraduate

All Audiences

Friday, October 26, 2012

Physics Graduate Student Social Hour

Social Event | August 28, 2009 – December 28, 2012 every Friday | 5-7 p.m. | LeConte Hall, 375 - Helmholz Room


Graduate Assembly


Graduate students, staff, and faculty from any department are invited to this weekly event held by the Physics Graduate Student Association as a forum for informal networking and communication between scientists and science enthusiasts from all career levels. Come by for a relaxing atmosphere with delicious refreshments usually sponsored by the GA.

Monday, October 29, 2012

Quantum dots in optical nanocavities: from cavity QED to applications

Colloquium | October 29 | 4:15-5:30 p.m. | LeConte Hall, Room #1


Jelena Vukovic, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University

Department of Physics


Quantum dots in optical nanocavities are interesting both as a test-bed for fundamental studies of light-matter interaction (cavity quantum electrodynamics - QED), as well as an integrated platform for information processing.


Faculty, Students - Graduate, Students - Undergraduate

All Audiences