Skip to main content.
Advanced search >
Print

Fall 2018

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Honoring Goddesses in a Family of Ancient Egyptian Tomb Workers: the case for Anuket and Hathor

Lecture | October 18 | 12-1 p.m. | 254 Barrows Hall


Deanna Kiser-Go, Graduate Student Affairs Officer, Dept. of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley

Near Eastern Studies


The Foreman Neferhotep and his immediate descendants held positions of influence in the Deir el-Medina workman’s community during the 19th Dynasty (c. 1307-1196 BCE). During their careers they oversaw the process of cutting and decorating the nearby royal tombs in the Valley of the Kings, but when it came time to design their own tombs their personal choices are apparent. This paper addresses how...   More >

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

What is Adabiyāt?: Forging Persian Literature and Its Domain (1860-1920)

Lecture | November 15 | 12-1 p.m. | 254 Barrows Hall


Aria Fani, PhD Candidate, Dept. of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley

Near Eastern Studies


What is literature? Posing this fundamental question allows me to critically delve into the conceptual history of literature in Persian in the mid-nineteenth and the early-twentieth centuries. In a way, this is a story of how a literary discourse was formed and later became an institution, casting its epistemic shadow over all modes of literary and cultural production in the Persian-speaking...   More >

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

The Concept of Translation in American Religious Studies

Lecture | March 21 | 12-1 p.m. | 254 Barrows Hall


Daniel Boyarin, Taubman Professor of Talmudic Culture, Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley

Near Eastern Studies


This paper will address the problem of using modern categories, especially "religion" in the study of non-modern cultures, focusing especially on Jewish materials. A strong theoretical component will be included in the discussion, as well.

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Telling Time by the Stars in Mesopotamia: Between Observational and Schematic Astronomy

Lecture | April 11 | 12-1 p.m. | 254 Barrows Hall


Gil Breger, PhD Candidate (Cuneiform Studies), Department of Near Eastern Studies, UCB

Near Eastern Studies


Astronomers in Mesopotamia used a group of stars, called ziqpu, in order to indicate and measure time at night. How exactly this was accomplished is unknown. Were they directly observed in the night sky as part of this time-telling practice, or did they belong to some kind of theoretical scheme that allowed astronomers to describe time? The talk will explore the evidence for both these...   More >